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Lots of Cloud on Tap at #CLUS

May 16, 2014 at 11:45 am PST

Are you ready to rumble?   Do you want to learn more about how to prepare for growing cloud workloads, how to evolve your IT department to harness the true potential of the cloud, and how to develop a more strategic approach to IT operations and service management? Be sure to check out what’s happening at CiscoLive in San Francisco and on line!

Can’t make it in person – not a problem, you can tune in online as well as access on demand sessions at your convenience.

From this page, you can find all the sessions and have the ability to register, add to your calendar, and view online.

We have 9 exciting keynotes that you won’t want to miss.  Some of the main keynotes and cloud specific sessions include:

Read Robert Lloyd bio.

Read Robert Lloyd bio.

Technology Business Vision  keynote by Rob Lloyd on Tuesday, May 20 at 10:00 a.m. PDT.

Join Cisco’s technology and business leadership for a deeper dive into what is happening both at Cisco and with our customers as the Internet of Everything becomes a reality. Find out what Cisco is doing today, what we’re planning in the future, and what others are doing to tap into the power of the Internet of Everything.

 

You won’t want to miss out on the Cloud Technology Trend Keynote – Aligning Your Strategy and Business for Cloud Success by Dr. Gee Rittenhouse and Faiyaz Shahpurwala on Tuesday, May 20 – 1:30 p.m. PDT.

Dr. Gee Rittenhouse and Faiyaz Shahpurwala

Dr. Gee Rittenhouse and Faiyaz Shahpurwala

This session will provide use cases and insights to answer the following questions:

      • How do you evolve your strategy at the right time with the right model?
      • Which cloud is right for which workload?
      • What is “fact or fiction” amid all of the cloud discussions and options?
      • Is your strategy aligning you for success?
      • Are your investments today setting you up for future success?

It will also highlight the latest products and solutions you need to maximize your company’s cloud experience. Cisco executives Dr. Gee Rittenhouse –CDO and Faiyaz Shahpurwala -- Senior Vice President, Cloud Infrastructure and Managed Services will share our hybrid cloud strategy with you, including solutions such as Cisco InterCloud and Intelligent Automation for Cloud. They’ll also discuss the role of applications and our partner ecosystem.

Cloud is such an important focus for Cisco and partners that we have a dedicated day on Monday 19 , called  Cisco Powered Cloud Day at Cisco Live.

The insightful day will focus on opportunities and challenges that can be addressed with cloud.

If you area partner , you may want to reserve your seat .  The all-day program is a comprehensive track for organizations adopting cloud and providing cloud services. You’ll not only learn from Cisco cloud leaders, but you’ll also hear from other industry leaders who are successfully taking advantage of the cloud with Cisco solutions.  The “Cisco Powered Cloud Day: The Rise of the Intercloud” full agenda can be found here.

Be sure to check in often to see the latest daily highlights of CiscoLive.

Watch #CLUS online, add specific sessions to your calendar, access the on-demand archive. #CL365

Follow the conversation online via #CLUS and #CiscoCloud.

 

Evelyn de Souza named to CloudNOW Top Women in Cloud Innovation Awards, 2014

Evelyn de Souza named to CloudNOW Top Women in Cloud Innovation Awards, 2014

Additional Cloud Information:

 

Pace of Change from Cisco Business Insights

 

Cisco Live is Cisco’s premier education and training destination for IT professionals worldwide. You’ll want to be a part of the largest gathering of Cisco customers, experts, and partners anywhere in the world, May 18-22 in San Francisco.  Join us for more than 600 sessions, 9 amazing keynotes, more than 200 of Cisco’s top partners, and a customer appreciation event you’ll never forget!

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Announcing Cisco UCS Director 5.0 – with Support for Application Centric Infrastructure

May 16, 2014 at 6:40 am PST

It’s that time of year again. Next week in San Francisco, an estimated 22,000 customers and partners will convene for our annual Cisco Live user conference in the U.S. It’s also when we make big announcements … and this year is no different. The event hasn’t even started and we just made our first major announcement this morning.

In today’s press release, we announced that Cisco is delivering on our vision for Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) – including the release of the new Cisco Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) later this summer. In that same time frame, we’ll be releasing version 5.0 of Cisco UCS Director – including APIC integration and support for ACI.

Cisco UCS Director is unique in the industry because it offers the ability to automate the provisioning of both virtual and physical data center infrastructure resources – including compute, network, and storage – from a single management console. Building upon other recent releases, this major new release of UCS Director provides richer automation, greater extensibility, and broader device support. Some of the new capabilities in UCS Director version 5.0 include:

  • Support for APIC and the Nexus 9000 Series to provide automated deployment of application-ready infrastructure across both traditional and ACI-based data center networking from a single user interface.
  • Enhancements to the core platform including a new software development kit and open APIs that allow third party hardware and software vendors to integrate directly with UCS Director.
  • Expanded support for Cisco’s complete UCS and Nexus product portfolio; third-party compute, storage, and virtualization vendors’ products; and integrated infrastructure systems including NetApp FlexPod, VCE Vblock Systems, and EMC VSPEX.
  • Rapid customer deployment and even faster time-to-value with over 800 pre-built tasks in the updated UCS Director task library.

You can learn more about what’s new in UCS Director 5.0 in this “at-a-glance” overview:

At-a-Glance: Cisco UCS Director version 5.0 from Cisco Data Center

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The Cisco Live! Green Plan

Cisco Live! 2014 will take place in San Francisco from May 19 to 22. Cisco is no stranger when it comes to finding new and innovative ways to support green initiatives such as energy conservation, sustainability and the smarter use of fiscal and natural resources. In fact, it’s been a part of how we have been doing business for years.

In recent years, organizations such as the Environment Protection Agency (EPA) and Greenpeace have ranked Cisco on top amongst other major IT companies.

Cisco Greenpeace
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Summary – Network Design for Automation

There has been a lot of recent online discussion about automation of the datacenter network, how we all may (or may not) need to learn programming, the value of a CCIE, and similar topics. This blog tries to look beyond all that. Assume network configuration has been automated. How does that affect network design?

Read my full article to find out more..

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Network Design for Automation

20140519-CISCO-spine-and-leafThere has been a lot of recent online discussion about automation of the datacenter network, how we all may (or may not) need to learn programming, the value of a CCIE, and similar topics. This blog tries to look beyond all that. Assume network configuration has been automated. How does that affect network design?

Automation can greatly change the network landscape, or it may change little. It depends on what you’re presently doing for design. Why? The reason is that the programmers probably assumed you’ve built your network in a certain way. As an example, Cisco DFA (Dynamic Fabric Automation) and ACI (Application Centric Infrastructure) are based on a Spine-Leaf CLOS tree topology.

Yes, some OpenFlow vendors have claimed to support arbitrary topologies. Arbitrary topologies are just not a great idea. Supporting them makes the programmers work harder to anticipate all the arbitrary things you might do. I want the programmers to focus on key functionality. Building the network in a well-defined way is a price I’m quite willing to pay. Yes, some backwards or migration compatibility is also desirable.

The programmers probably assumed you bought the right equipment and put it together in some rational way. The automated tool will have to tell you how to cable it up, or it  might check your compliance with the recommended design. Plan on this when you look to automation for sites, a datacenter, or a WAN network.

The good news here is the the Cisco automated tools are likely to align with Cisco Validated Designs. The CVD’s provide a great starting point for any network design, and they have recently been displaying some great graphics. They’re a useful resource if you don’t want to re-invent the wheel — especially a square wheel. While I disagree with a few aspects of some of them, over the years most of them have been great guidelines.

The more problematic part of this is that right now, many of us are (still!) operating in the era of hand-crafted networks. What does the machine era and the assembly line bring with it? We will have to give up one-off designs and some degree of customization. The focus will shift to repeated design elements and components. Namely, the type of design the automated tool can work with.

Some network designers are already operating in such a fashion. Their networks may not be automated, but they follow repeatable standards. Like an early factory working with inter-changeable parts. Such sites have likely created a small number of design templates and then used them repeatedly. Examples: ”small remote office”, “medium remote office”, “MPLS-only office”, or “MPLS with DMVPN backup office”.

However you carve things up, there should only be a few standard models, including “datacenter” and perhaps “HQ” or “campus”. If you know the number of users (or size range) in each such site, you can then pre-size WAN links, approximate number of APs, licenses, whatever. You can also pre-plan your addressing, with, say, a large block of  /25′s for very small offices, /23′s for medium, etc.

On the equipment side, a small office might have one router with both MPLS and DMVPN links, one core switch, and some small number of access switches. A larger office might have one router each for MPLS and one for DMPVN, two core switches, and more access switches. Add APs, WAAS, and other finishing touches as appropriate. Degree of criticality is another dimension you can add to the mix: critical sites would have more redundancy, or be more self-contained. Whatever you do, standardize the equipment models as much as possible, updating every year or two (to keep the spares inventory simple).

It takes some time to think through and document such internal standards. But probably not as much as you think! And then you win when you go to deploy, because everything becomes repeatable.

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