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Cisco Advancing Virtualization with AT&T

Cisco’s secret weapons are our engineers and our commitment to innovation that solves our customers’ business problems.

When we committed ourselves to being the leader in networking virtualization in the service provider industry, our team has been maniacally focused on Network Function Virtualization (NFV) to enable our customers to transform their network architectures and prepare their businesses for the future.

We doubled the number of virtualized functions last year, and have done the same again this year, to reach more than 100 – a number that represents the breadth of our portfolio and the scope of the opportunity this new approach to networking brings to service providers.

Today was an important validation of our commitment to NFV and another strong proof point as to how virtualization is moving beyond “proof of concept” and into the largest networks on the globe. Together, with AT&T, we announced that our two companies are collaborating to enhance the AT&T Network on Demand platform by developing and deploying advanced virtualized technologies, including software-based customer premise equipment (CPE), that will deliver expanded benefits to business customers.


AT&T is utilizing Software Defined Networking (SDN) and NFV technologies to create dynamic, on-demand services. In March, we announced our joint efforts with virtualization to connect cars in Europe, and are pleased that we can work again with our long-standing partner, as they lead the shift to next-generation networking by providing customers more flexible and scalable services and experiences.

AT&T and other trailblazing service providers are in an enviable position, bringing together people, processes, data, and things to make networked connections more relevant and valuable than ever before.

By combining Cisco’s expertise and industry-leading portfolio with AT&T’s vision and industry leadership, together we are working to capture new business opportunities that deliver on the promise of virtualization.

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Making the Last Traffic Jam a Reality

Traffic jams aren’t just stressful—they’re expensive. A recent study by the Centre for Economics and Business Research revealed that in 2013 traffic jams cost the U.S. $124 billion. By 2030, they estimate the annual price of traffic in the U.S. and Europe will soar to $293 billion.

Can we turn this around? I think so. The Last Traffic Jam can happen through the Internet of Everything (IoE) and the increased value that comes from connections between people, process, data, and things. It’s in this highly connected world where we’ll see amazing things happen—including the Last Traffic Jam. Read More »

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Beyond Things: The Internet of Everything Takes Connections to the Power of Four

Over the last year, I (and many of my colleagues) have spent a lot of time talking about the Internet of Everything (IoE) and how it’s transforming our world. I thought, however, it would be good to pause in this blog and clarify what we mean by the “Internet of Everything” in just a little more detail. I’ve mentioned in the past that IoE consists of four “pillars”: people, process, data and things, but let’s take a closer look.

Many people are familiar with the concept of the Internet of Things (IoT). Not only does it have its own Wikipedia article, but last month the Internet of Things was added to the Oxford dictionary, which defines it as “a proposed development of the Internet in which everyday objects have network connectivity, allowing them to send and receive data.” So it’s not surprising that people might be confused when we start talking about the Internet of Everything. What’s the difference? Is IoE simply a rebranding of IoT?

The fact is, the Internet of Things is just one of four dimensions — people, process, data, and things — we talk about in the Internet of Everything. If we take a closer look at each of these dimensions, and how they work together, we’ll begin to see the transformative value of IoE.

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