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Vulnerability Spotlight: Apple Quicktime Corrupt stbl Atom Remote Code Execution

This post was authored by Rich Johnson, William Largent, and Ryan Pentney. Earl Carter contributed to this post.

Cisco Talos, in conjunction with Apple’s security advisory issued on June 30th,  is disclosing the discovery of a remote code execution vulnerability within Apple Quicktime. This vulnerability was initially discovered by the Talos Vulnerability Research & Development Team and reported in accordance with responsible disclosure policies to Apple.

There is a remote code execution vulnerability in Apple Quicktime (TALOS-CAN-0018, CVE-2015-3667). An attacker who can control the data inside an stbl atom in a .MOV file can cause an undersized allocation which can lead to an out-of-bounds read. An attacker can use this to create a use-after-free scenario that could lead to remote code execution.

There is a function within QuickTime (QuickTimeMPEG4!0x147f0) which is responsible for processing the data in an hdlr atom. There is a 16-byte memory region, allocated near the beginning of the function, if the hdlr subtype field in an mdia atom is set to ‘vide’, this reference is passed to a set of two functions.

apple-qt-stbl-0

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Cisco Announces Intent to Acquire OpenDNS

Every day, more people, processes, data and things become connected. As this trend continues to grow exponentially, so too, do opportunities for security breaches and malicious threats. With an estimated 50 billion devices being connected by 2020, enterprise customers will face greater challenges in protecting their ever-expanding networks. To address these risks Cisco is focused on providing solutions across the extended network for its customers, what we call Security Everywhere. We are embedding threat protection capabilities from the enterprise infrastructure to the data center, from mobile to the cloud, and on the endpoints within their environment.

To enhance our strategy, I am pleased to announce our intent to acquire OpenDNS, a leading provider of advanced threat protection for any device, anywhere, anytime, delivered in a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) model. The acquisition will extend our ability to provide customers enhanced visibility and threat protection for unmonitored and potentially unsecure entry points into the network, and to quickly and efficiently deploy and integrate these capabilities as part of their defense architecture. This acquisition builds on Cisco’s security strategy, adding broad visibility and predictive threat intelligence from OpenDNS’ cloud platform, accessed by more than 65 million users daily.

To build on Cisco’s advanced threat protection capabilities, we plan to continue to innovate a cloud delivered Security platform integrating OpenDNS’ key capabilities to accelerate that work. Over time, we will look to unite our cloud-delivered solutions, enhancing Cisco’s advanced threat protection capabilities across the full attack continuum—before, during and after an attack.

The OpenDNS team will join the Cisco Security Business Group under the leadership of Senior Vice President and General Manager David Goeckeler. Their deep security expertise and key technologies will be a natural fit to Cisco’s security vision and the Security Business Group. The acquisition is expected to close in the first quarter of fiscal 2016.

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AMP Threat Grid integrates with Tripwire Enterprise

Today’s threat landscape is completely different than last year; and next years will be, not surprisingly, even worse. The Industrialization of Hacking has spawned a new era of professional, entrepreneurial, and resourceful cyber criminals. In recent year’s dynamic malware analysis (aka sandboxing) has become the shiny new technology that we all want, no, need to have. At one time anti-virus held this position as well, and the same will eventually be said of sandbox technology used to fight advanced malware.

You may have purchased a sandbox a few years ago but it’s likely that your malware analysis needs have gone beyond the traditional sandboxing technologies that simply extract suspicious samples, analyze in a local virtual machine, and quarantine. You need a more robust malware analysis tool that fits into your infrastructure and can continuously detect even the most advanced threats that are environmentally aware and can evade detection.

Tripwire recently partnered with Cisco and integrated the AMP Threat Grid dynamic malware analysis solutions into Tripwire Enterprise. But why choose this dynamic malware analysis tool? After careful evaluation there were a few key reasons to integrate this tool versus others:

  1. It’s not just dynamic malware analysis

    AMP Threat Grid provides both static and dynamic malware analysis, and a full subscription provides an API that is used to seamlessly deliver context rich threat intelligence into existing security technologies.

  2. Not everyone out there is a security expert

    Heck, very few are. AMP Threat Grid was designed to empower junior security analysts by providing a Threat Score so they can easily determine how malicious a sample is. The behavioral indicators are written in plain English so they can understand what the file is doing, and why its behavior is malicious, suspicious, or benign.

    Tripwire Sandboxing 1

  3. Lack of instrumentation

    AMP Threat Grid was designed without any instrumentation inside the virtual machine. Most experts agree that around 40% of today’s malware is environment aware, checking to see if it is running in a sandbox or the age of the operating system before detonating.

There are 3 ways that most people deploy a malware analysis tool:

  1. A stand-alone solution designed to feed itself samples for analysis without dependency on other security products. This has the most flexibility in deployment but adds significant hardware costs and complexity to management and analysis, especially for distributed enterprises.
  2. A distributed feeding sensor approach, such as firewalls, IPS, or UTMs with built-in sandboxing capabilities. These solutions are usually cost effective and easy to deploy but are less effective in detecting a broad range of suspicious files including web files. They can also introduce bandwidth limitations that can hamper network performance and privacy concerns when a cloud-based solution is the only option.
  3. Built into secure content gateways, such as web or email gateways. This approach is also cost effective but focuses on web and email channels only and also introduces performance limitations and privacy concerns.

Since Tripwire is already monitoring and collecting the data on your mission critical systems, these approaches don’t seem to work. But there’s a fourth way that actually takes the best of what these approaches offer and raises the bar to help you fight well-funded attackers that get better at what they do every day: Cisco AMP Threat Grid. Through AMP Threat Grid, Cisco offers advanced malware analysis and intelligence that delivers integration directly with Tripwire Enterprise providing you with a better ROI and more visibility into what is happening in your environment. Tripwire has integrated AMP Threat Grid into their Tripwire Enterprise, providing both static and dynamic analysis so you can better understand the malware targeting your organization, as well as the ability to automate the consumption of threat intelligence into your existing security infrastructure.

How does the Integration actually work?

AMP Threat Grid’s content driven security analytics dynamically and statically analyzes all submitted files, executing the sample in a safe environment, examining the behavior of the samples, and correlating the results with hundreds of millions of other analyzed malware artifacts. In less than 10 minutes AMP Threat Grid reports back and Tripwire Enterprise tags the file with the result. This enables Tripwire Enterprise customers to prioritize actions for changes on systems with threats identified by AMP Threat Grid and initiate workflow actions for quick remediation.

Tripwire Sandboxing 2

Not only does AMP Threat Grid analyze a broad range of objects, but those interested in an AMP Threat Grid subscription will also be provided with deep analytics capabilities wrapped with robust context. With over 350 behavioral indicators and a malware knowledge base sourced from around the globe, AMP Threat Grid provides more accurate, context rich analytics into malware than ever before. Tripwire customers can register for their free demo here.

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Remembering the small things: IT Security

There are many tasks and responsibilities of the (lone) IT sysadmin, they are sometimes varied, sometimes monotonous.  We know what they are without thinking about them, as if they are unwritten commandments, specific to the IT world.

Security has featured greatly in the world news over the past few years, and even more so within the IT circles. We have the aspects of social responsibility, who is watching the watchers, how should they be held to account (NSA, GCHQ). We have the more particular stories, such as Heartbleed, and the “simplicity” of gaining information from a system.

Sitting down and reading about the recently highlighted issue surrounding a fake Trojan copy of the popular terminal tool, PuTTY, I realized that over all, we spend a great deal thinking about security within IT systems. But sometimes we don’t think about security in the actions we take, or we forget to think about them. Read More »

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Responding to Third Party Vulnerabilities

We are now more than one year on from the release of HeartBleed, the first major vulnerability disclosed in widely used third-party code. This is an excellent point in time to look back at what Cisco and our customers have achieved since, including how the Cisco Product Security Incident Response Team (PSIRT) has evolved to meet this new type of threat. It’s also a key time for us to confirm and clarify our commitment to transparency in the vulnerability disclosure process.

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