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Ask The #IoE Futurist: “Will the future of battery technology prohibit the advancement of computers or technology in general?”

In my role as Cisco’s Chief Futurist, I get many questions about what the future holds and how new technology and emerging solutions will change our lives. Given the positive feedback and the volume of questions being submitted from the community around the first series, I’ve decided to do another series to answer questions from the education and tech community around the Internet of Everything (IoE). Whether the questions are global in scope, such as how the Internet of Everything will shape our world, or small in nature, like today’s Ask the #IoE Futurist question about batteries, I enjoy the challenge of answering them all.

It’s true what most school teachers say, “There is no such thing as a bad question.”

In fact, when it comes to questioning what the future of technology looks like, the ideas from Malcolm Gladwell’s famous book, The Tipping Point, come to life.

Gladwell states that a tipping point is when a small idea, technology or trend crosses a threshold and “spreads like wildfire.” Today, we are witnessing a tipping point in technology innovation that is representative of small innovations that have a compounding effect on society. Microscopic sensors, tiny wearable mobile devices, miniscule packets of energy, and even an AA battery have the potential to impact future innovation and what it means to be connected.

In this post, I’ll answer a question from Chad, a student of Cisco Champion Karen Woodard, about how specifically new developments in battery technology could impact new solutions.  Here is Chad’s question:

Question: “Will the future of battery technology prohibit the advancement of computers or technology in general?”

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Open Source is just the other side, the wild side!

March is a rather event-laden month for Open Source and Open Standards in networking: the 89th IETF, EclipseCon 2014, RSA 2014, the Open Networking Summit, the IEEE International Conference on Cloud (where I’ll be talking about the role of Open Source as we morph the Cloud down to Fog computing) and my favorite, the one and only Open Source Think Tank where this year we dive into the not-so-small world (there is plenty of room at the bottom!) of machine-to-machine (m2m) and Open Source, that some call the Internet of Everything.

There is a lot more to March Madness, of course, in the case of Open Source, a good time to celebrate the 1st anniversary of “Meet Me on the Equinox“, the fleeting moment where daylight conquered the night the day that project Daylight became Open Daylight. As I reflect on how quickly it started and grew from the hearts and minds of folks more interested in writing code than talking about standards, I think about how much the Network, previously dominated, as it should, by Open Standards, is now beginning to run with Open Source, as it should. We captured that dialog with our partners and friends at the Linux Foundation in this webcast I hope you’ll enjoy. I hope you’ll join us in this month in one of these neat places.

As Open Source has become dominant in just about everything, Virtualization, Cloud, Mobility, Security, Social Networking, Big Data, the Internet of Things, the Internet of Everything, you name it, we get asked how do we get the balance right? How does one work with the rigidity of Open Standards and the fluidity of Open Source, particularly in the Network? There is only one answer, think of it as the Yang of Open Standards, the Yin of Open Source, they need each other, they can not function without the other, particularly in the Network.  Open Source is just the other side, the wild side!

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Data Security Through the Cloud [summary]

Is the combination of cloud computing and mobility a perfect storm of security threats?

Actually, yes. And you should prepare for them as if there is a storm coming.

As businesses become increasingly mobile, so does sensitive data. In fact, in a recent survey conducted by ESG,

31% of security professionals say that the biggest risk associated with cloud infrastructure services is, “privacy concerns associated with sensitive and/or regulated data stored and/or processed by a cloud infrastructure provider.”

Data Security Through the Cloud

 

With cloud-based services, it is key to have visibility into applications and provide consistent experience across devices accessing the web and cloud applications. More users are leaving the standard PC behind and engaging cloud applications through a mobile device, making application-layer security and user access security critical. Smartphones and tablets are able to connect to applications running anywhere, including public, private and hybrid cloud applications, opening your data to potential attacks. Security professionals need assurances that their cloud security provider will appropriately secure customer data while ensuring availability and uptime.

 

The conversation is no longer if you’ll be attacked, but when. And will you be prepared?

Read the full article: Data Security Through the Cloud

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Data Security Through the Cloud

Is the combination of cloud computing and mobility a perfect storm of security threats?

Actually, yes. And you should prepare for them as if there is a storm coming. As businesses become increasingly mobile, so does sensitive data. In fact, in a recent survey conducted by ESG,

31% of security professionals say that the biggest risk associated with cloud infrastructure services is, “privacy concerns associated with sensitive and/or regulated data stored and/or processed by a cloud infrastructure provider.”

Data Security Through the CloudDid you know:

16 billion web requests are inspected every day through Cisco Cloud Web Security

93 billion emails are inspected every day by Cisco’s hosted email solution

 200,000 IP addresses are evaluated daily

400,000 malware samples are evaluated daily

33 million endpoint files are evaluated every day by FireAMP

28 million network connects are evaluated every day by FireAMP

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IoE’s Promise for the Public Sector

Internet of Everything (IoE) is touted as the next big thing in 2014. Tech pundits, Silicon Valley executives, entrepreneurs and government officials predict that Internet of Everything will be a “multi-trillion dollar business,” which has the potential to transform our physical world with a variety of remotely operated objects. Cisco predicts some 25 billion devices will be connected by 2015, and 50 billion by 2020.

Within the public sector, IoE has the capacity to reveal new ways to manage infrastructure, reduce operational costs and improve the lives of citizens with innovative service offerings. This includes public safety initiatives involving first responders, physical  security and fleet management in municipalities. For example, IoE helps keep first responders in constant communication with dispatchers, traffic management systems, and other agencies.  It can also provide  greater situational awareness with onsite video surveillance access and other environmental sensors.   Similarly, IoE also provides greater safety and convenience for passengers and drivers with real-time monitoring of vehicles, GPS data mapped to schedules and interactive onboard services. Read More »

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