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Cisco Provides Leadership in Newly Formed OpenFog Consortium

The OpenFog Consortium has made its debut as an ecosystem of industry and academic leaders to foster an open architecture for fog computing in the Internet of Things (IoT). This is an important milestone that will accelerate IoT deployments and maximize their value across a wide range of industries.

AP46072_small_croppedMy friend and colleague, Helter Antunes, has been a pivotal force in forming the OpenFog Consortium and has worked tirelessly with other founding members to iron out the myriad of details involved in creating this sort of multi-party organization. He has also been instrumental in developing Cisco’s own fog computing strategy. That is why I am particularly pleased to congratulate him on being named the OpenFog Consortium’s first chairman, who will guide the group through its formative stages. Read More »

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OpenFog Consortium: An Ecosystem to Accelerate End-to-End IoT Solutions

Over the past several months,OpenFog Logo V1.01 I have been privileged to represent Cisco in working with other industry and academic partners to form the OpenFog Consortium, which was announced earlier today. You can learn more in the press release about what this new organization is, but I want to focus on why such an organization is so important at this stage of development of the Internet of Things (IoT).

Earlier this week, my colleague Maciej Kranz discussed the city of Barcelona’s fog computing proof of concept, which was showcased at the Smart City World Expo Congress. The proof of concept demonstrated that fog technology can bring intelligence to a range of urban services, including transportation, parking, lighting, traffic and waste management, public safety, and law enforcement.

But smart city services are only the beginning. Fog computing can provide immense value across all industries. For example, it might take 12 days via satellite to transmit one day’s worth of data to the cloud from a remote oil rig. With fog computing the data is processed locally, and safety or equipment alerts can be acted upon immediately. In manufacturing and transportation, preventive maintenance applications can process a huge amount of sensor data to trigger needed maintenance before there is an equipment failure. In retail, data from parking lot video cameras can not only provide security surveillance, but can also work with fog analytics capabilities to predict store traffic flow and optimize checkout staffing.

OpenFog Chart

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Building Scalable, Sustainable, Smart+Connected Communities with Fog Computing

This week, Cisco is showcasing innovations across our Smart+Connected Communities portfolio at the Smart City World Expo Congress in Barcelona.

We’ve entered the digital age and smart cities worldwide are embracing technologies to streamline their operations and meet the growing expectations of their citizens. Today, citizens in the most vibrant cities are already seeing many initiatives designed to make urban services smarter, whether for transportation, parking, lighting, traffic and waste management, safety or law enforcement.

Urban services powered by the Internet will certainly enhance citizen quality of life, but developing this new generation of services requires integrating together many disparate technologies and billions of “things,” or devices. Today, it’s estimated that some 15 billion devices are connected, and this number is set to explode to 50 billion by 2020, particularly in and around urban centers. This complex assemblage will generate and transmit unimaginable amounts of data from all kinds of sensors, mobile devices and smart “things” to and through the Internet.

As the network of connected things grows, an increasingly significant volume of the data will be produced at its edge, where the data will also need to be processed, analyzed, and secured. As a result, new computer processing technologies must also be placed at the network edge to manage this new deluge in a distributed way across a citywide network to intelligently connect and inform people, processes, data and things. These technologies must deliver computing power at an unprecedented scale and help cities ensure economic, social and environmental sustainability.

What does that mean in practical terms?

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Not Just for Holidays: My Recipe for IoT Success

MaciejReceipePic1Sharing recipes among family and friends is a long-standing holiday tradition. I have my own favorite recipe, but it’s not part of an extravagant holiday dinner. It’s my recipe for success in the Internet of Things (IoT).

Over the past six months or so, I’ve discussed in this series of blogs the various elements to consider in an IoT deployment. We have seen that IoT is an essential next step for companies in the 21st century, but it’s also a complex, multidimensional transformation, demanding new skill sets, technologies, and business models. So you may be asking, how do I get started? Here is my recipe for a successful IoT transition. Read More »

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Analytics for Oil and Gas – real-time data enabling real-time intelligence and response

Andrew Miller, Sr. Sales Engineer from Bit Stew Systems, showed me an oil and gas use case a short while ago. He was using real-time analytics to demonstrate how an energy company could monitor and respond to a natural disaster that might effect an oil and gas pipeline infrastructure. I was impressed by the visualizations he showed me and how he could interact with a map on the screen that was showing real-time analytical data fed in from a number of sources.

The demo shows some critical assets in the service territory in the north west of North America. That includes pipelines, block valves stations, initial injection stations, pumps, regulators and the like. We were able to see lots of details on the assets, and real-time status. Andrew simulated a natural disaster event (a fire), and that info would generally come from a live data feed and be overlaid on the map. We then looked at the affected assets and which ones were at risk. The really cool thing was the modeling of where the fire might spread to (based on weather). Response teams could be dispatched in real time to tackle the situation, and the situation monitored so that crews could be sent to where the fire was likely to spread to. Crew locations could be seen, again in real time.

Bit Stew Blog #1Bit Stew’s MIx Director™ (formerly Grid Director™) works with Cisco IOx and enables industrial companies to discover actionable insights that optimize operational performance. Andrew talks about how it leverages Cisco IOx and therefore hardened infrastructure that might include Cisco CGR or ISR solutions can be implemented enabling ‘fog computing’ or edge computing as it’s sometimes called.

IOx enables the analytics to be closer to the edge of the network. Closer to the sensors and devices that energy companies want to monitor. That relieves the pressure on the central IT sites and allows faster analysis at the source. Read More »

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