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The #InternetOfEverything Machine and What it Means to the World

Typically art and technology make strange bedfellows. But the Internet of Everything Machine at Cisco Live San Francisco in June was undeniably one of the coolest interactive installations I’ve seen at a conference. The exhibit simulated an attendee’s journey through a city connected by real-time data, so each visitor got a unique and personalized digital city experience. More importantly, it demonstrated how the Internet of Everything will help a city run more efficiently and the positive impact that can have on citizens.

From streetlights that turn themselves off to save energy and recycling bins that communicate when they’re full, to self-adjusting traffic lights that prevent traffic jams and smart luggage that tracks itself – the possibilities are endless.

The Internet of Everything Machine was a temporary exhibit at Cisco Live, but the Internet of Everything is becoming our reality. While it is certain to shape our future, it’s also in action today. The Internet of Everything (IoE) is not a tangible item. Rather, it is the connections between people, process, data and things that create more valuable and relevant experiences than any of us could have ever imagined before.

Ioe Machine Erica Schroeder 8.7.14

Many elements that make up the Internet of Everything are not new and each can function independently. But, the true power of the Internet of Everything lies in all of them working together to create richer experiences and economic opportunities for everyone – businesses, individuals and even countries.

For example, a recent economic analysis estimates the Internet of Everything represents a $19 trillion opportunity for public and private sector organizations over the next decade. This occurs from cost savings, productivity gains, new revenue and improved citizen, worker and consumer experiences.

The Internet of Everything makes our everyday lives more convenient. Our ability to make payments from our smart devices, a store associate using a hand-held device to expedite checkouts and even one day riding in a self-driving car are all innovations made possible by the Internet of Everything.

The Internet of Everything Machine gave Cisco Live attendees a glimpse into a concept city that could run seamlessly with the Internet of Everything. And all over the world, corporations, municipal agencies and individuals have used it to improve their operations and even their health:

  • In Dubai, one of the world’s fastest-growing and cosmopolitan cities, cranes that swing too close to one another are halted by an Internet-connected system, safeguarding a network of 37 cranes and 5,000 workers near the world’s tallest buildings.
  • Though many of its operations take place deep inside mountains, Dundee Precious Metals utilizes WiFi-enabled vehicles, haulers and crushers and above-ground command centers to capture real-time data, resulting in a cost-savings of $2.5 million and production increase of 400%.
  • Wearables have made great strides in improving healthcare and have the potential to save lives when seconds count. Already, 21% of Americans use wearable devices to help track health data. What’s even more exciting for the medical field and patient care is that wearables can be outfitted with technology that allows them to communicate with doctors and other healthcare professionals directly. A Band-Aid that indicates if a wound is healed, skin patch wireless blood glucose monitors and systems that sound an alert when it’s time to refill a prescription are all possible through the Internet of Everything.
  • New York, a burgeoning “Smart City” has partnered with City 24x7 to make public communications available to anyone, anytime, anywhere with their Smart Screens. These screens are interactive and highly-visible in area train stations, malls and sport facilities and transmit offers, services and area information in real-time. And, they can be accessed via smartphones, tablets and laptops!

Through these few examples it’s easy to see that the Internet of Everything’s societal and enterprise advances are making a real impact. The Internet of Everything is changing everything about the way we live and the ways we can live. There will be challenges, but as John Chambers noted, overcoming them will take precedence, because the benefits are far too great to ignore.

Dream big – what are some of the innovations you’d like to see the Internet of Everything make possible? What does your City of Tomorrow look like? We want to know what examples of the Internet of Everything you see in your own City of Tomorrow – your neighborhood! Join the conversation online by tagging your photo and video examples with #InternetOfEverything and #CityOfTomorrow.

Be sure to follow @CiscoIoE on Twitter and join the conversation, #InternetOfEverything and #CityOfTomorrow.

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Building Professional Skills for the Internet of Things

August 7, 2014 at 7:30 am PST

In my conversations with our customers and partners, one of most frequent topics is the need of aligning the skills of the Operational Technology (OT) and Information Technology (IT) professionals to the new capabilities offered by Internet of Things (IoT) related technologies and solutions, and the changing conditions and demands of the business.

There is plenty of training in the market about configuring and maintaining all the new smart objects that are coming to the market. But the specific nature of these devices radically changes the way the essential infrastructure that is needed to interconnect them should be planned, designed, deployed and maintained. These are not traditional networks.

The IoT network infrastructure for all these new “things” has to deal with several new challenges. For one, IoT devices are not traditional computing devices. There are literally hundreds of different protocols used by these devices.  They may have very specific needs in terms of speed and frequency of connectivity.  Many of them are super susceptible to changes in delay and latency, some of them connect intermittently, while some others just come in range from time to time.  Many operate 24x7 under the harshest conditions, and a lot of them where designed to operate in hierarchical and closed loop networks.

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Manufacturing, IoT and Innovation – What’s the Missing LInk?

My colleague Chet Namboodri recently discussed, “The Internet of Things and the Future of Manufacturing” with Manufacturing Revival Radio.  In the interview, Chet discussed how best in class manufacturers like GM and Stanley Black and Decker are driving innovation and capturing real business value across their value chain by developing and executing an IoT strategy.

Manufacturers like GM and Stanley Black and Decker are creating this platform for innovation by deploying open standards–based Internet Protocol (IP) technologies that converge their enterprise and plant floor networks. The convergence enables tight integration of operation technology (OT) and information technology (IT), creating a flexible and scalable platform to:2439633

Speaking of security, it is cited by most manufacturers as the key barrier to IoT adoption and innovation.  The prospect of connecting millions, potentially billions of sensors, actuators, motors, gauges, valves, and machines with Manufacturing Operations Management (MOM) applications like MES (Manufacturing Execution Systems) and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) applications can make VP of Supply Chains, Operation Managers and the like want to go back to the old island of automation model that Chet cited in his interview.

As daunting as security may be to innovation and IoT adoption. The skills workforce gap in the industry is the biggest threat and concern for manufacturing executives and managers. ThomasNet conducted a survey of over 1200 line of business manufacturing professionals .  The survey cited that Generation Y (18-32 years old) employees will make up 75 percent of the workforce by 2025, but three-quarters of manufacturers report that 25 percent or less of their workforce are in the Generation Y age group.

Cisco recognizes that new skills and education are the missing link required to drive innovation and realize the value afforded by IoT in the manufacturing industry.

To prepare and attract the next generation manufacturing workforce Cisco has launched the Cisco Industrial Networking Specialist Certification for information technology (IT) and operational technology (OT) professionals in the manufacturing, process control, and oil and gas industries who install, maintain, and troubleshoot industrial network systems. This certification ensures candidates have the foundational skills to manage and administer networked industrial control systems. It provides plant administrators, control system engineers and traditional network engineers with an understanding of the networking technologies needed in today’s connected plants and enterprises.

What are your major barriers to IoT Adoption?  Security, transitional workforce, ….?  In the meantime, be sure to visit the Industrial IP Advantage website for more information around how you can leverage IP technologies to accelerate your path to IoT value.

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Congratulations to the IoT Innovation Grand Challenge Semi-finalists!

IoT Innovation Grand ChallengeIn April 2014, Cisco announced the IoT Innovation Grand Challenge, a global, open competition aimed at recognizing, promoting and accelerating the adoption of breakthrough technologies that will contribute to the growth and evolution of the Internet of Things.  The response was overwhelming with fantastic submissions.

We received over 800 submissions from startups all over the world on a diverse set of topics – from agriculture to Wifi with ble, gps, m2m, rfid and many more things in between.   The top 5 submission categories were: Smart Cities with 166 entries, Healthcare with 123, Retail (98), Education (80) and Transportation (59).

Announcing the Nineteen Semi-Finalists!

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Modernizing Public Safety Communications

Modernizing Public Safety Communications

Your existing radios and voice system do more, with Cisco IPICS 4.8

If your agency uses Cisco Unified Communications as well as PTT radio communications, you can make both more valuable by adding Cisco IP Interoperability and Collaboration System (IPICS).Communicate, Collaborate, Operate 3

Hundreds of public safety agencies around the world already use Cisco IPICS to make radio dispatch operations simpler. IPICS improves incident response because personnel can join PTT talk groups using just about any device. That includes land-mobile radios, smartphones, IP phones, PCs and laptops, and even traditional phones.

The newest release, IPICS 4.8, has new features that improve communications, collaboration, and operations. Read More »

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