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Cisco helps to advance Health IT Collaboration and Communication

This is an exciting week for Cisco and for the Health IT industry at large.  Two big industry events are taking plan this week: Epic’s Users’ Group Meeting and National Health IT Week.

Epic’s 2014 Users’ Group Meeting: Down on the Farm
If you are planning to attend Epic’s 2014 Users’ Group Meeting from September 15-19 in Verona, WI, be sure to visit the Cisco booth (#316) to see solutions that improve the patient experience and facilitate collaboration, including:

  • Epic UGMCisco Virtual Sitter Patient Observation: Video-enabled, centralized approach that allows trained staff to monitor multiple high-risk patients while also delivering two-way communications to alert clinical staff about potential patient situations.
  • Cisco JabberAll-in-one collaboration application that brings together video, voice, and IM on any device.
  • Cisco Extended CareA personal health and wellness collaboration platform, enabling patient engagement and care team interactions at any time and from anywhere.

Also, drop off a business card to register for a chance to win a $250 American Express gift card.

National Health IT Week: One Voice, One Vision
NHIT WeekNational Health IT Week (NHIT Week) is a collaborative forum and virtual awareness week that assembles key healthcare constituents dedicated to working together to elevate the necessity of advancing health through the best use of information technology. Cisco is one of 425 healthcare partners helping to bring this important cause to the forefront of the nation’s attention through events in Washington D.C., at the HIMSS 9th Annual Policy Summit, and other events throughout the week.  Follow tweets at #NHITWeek.

How the Internet of Everything enhances the quality of care
Both of these events highlight how hospitals and healthcare providers are now using the power of the Internet of Everything to expand their outreach within and outside their healthcare organizations.  From connecting patients with chronic medical conditions to using mobile technologies to help remind patients to take their medications on time, hospitals are incorporating new and innovative ways to improve the efficiency of care-delivery.  Cisco is here to help you adapt to these changes in accessing quality care and bringing expert care to your patients.

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Cisco Connected Health Newsletter, Summer 2014

Have you read the latest Cisco Connected Health newsletter?  In an effort to bring you relevant stories about the positive impacts of health IT, this issue features real-world implementations including:

Using video and remote medical  equipment, UVA Center for Telehealth  provides basic medical examinations and services in 40 specialties, including psychiatry, cardiology, pediatric specialties, child neurology, orthopedics, and genetic studies.

By transitioning their data center to Cisco UCS Blade Servers and Cisco Unified Fabric, Southern Illinois Healthcare achieved greater performance and flexibility with integrated management while saving over $200,000 in capital expenditures due to data center efficiencies.

Houston Methodist recently implemented Cisco wireless solutions to handle the exponential proliferation of wireless devices and applications at their 500,000-square-foot research institute in and five hospitals.

Mountain States Health Alliance reduced IT problems by installing an infrastructure capable of handling updates, scaling, and ensuring security while providing visibility into the network.

The latest newsletter also includes an introduction to the new Cisco DX70 and DX80 endpoints and a series of video clips featuring Barbara Casey, Senior Director of Health Care Business Transformation at Cisco, about trends in healthcare innovation.

Be sure to subscribe now to get our quarterly newsletter delivered directly to your inbox!

Cisco Connected Health Newsletter

 

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Indoor Wi-Fi Location and Beacons: Better Together Part 2

wifibeaconLocation-based services have been getting a lot of attention lately and people are increasingly curious about how Wi-Fi and beacons play together in the hot space that is indoor location technology. In my last blog I reviewed how beacons work and how to differentiate when to use Wi-Fi and beacons. There’ve been some great questions about beacon technology and how it complements Cisco’s location-based Connected Mobile Experiences (CMX) solution, so I want to follow up on these topics with everyone.

What types of beacons are there?

Generally, there are two different classes of beacons: transmit only and backhaul enabled.

Transmit only beacons are exactly as they sound -- they simply transmit information to anyone that is capable of hearing (bluetooth enabled smartphones). They do not receive or pass any data or information upstream.

Apple’s iBeacon is the best example of this type of BLE beacon. You can think of them like the navigational beacons used by airplanes when on approach to major airports. The beacon doesn’t even know the plane is there, but the plane is aware of the beacon and knows where the beacon is allowing it to take the correct action. Same is true for smartphones and transmit only beacons like iBeacon -- the intelligence is located in the mobile application which must recognize the beacon and take appropriate action.

Backhaul enabled beacons generally include a Wi-Fi chipset for either management or data capabilities. Some backhaul enabled beacons are USB enabled and take advantage of whatever connectivity exists within the PC they are connected. Read More »

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Mobile Technology Spotlight: Mobile Phone Microscopes for the Developing World

Aydogan Ozcan_IMAGEThis is a guest blog contributed by Dr. Aydogan Ozcan, Chancellor’s Professor at UCLA. **

In many developing regions today, cellphones and other mobile devices have begun to play a significant role in healthcare distribution. Local networks operated by service providers allow medical staff to utilize mobile technology to treat, educate, and set follow-up appointment dates with patients. Not only can patients access information about their health, but they can meet with physicians via video over the mobile network. For regions where people may be hundreds or even thousands of miles from a local doctor or hospital, these mobile devices can become lifesaving tools.

While cell phones and other mobile devices such as PCs and tablets can serve as a source of medical information or as a virtual meeting place between a doctor and patient, the technology itself can play a more important role of improving health care in developing regions as an actual medical device. Take for example, the work of University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Chancellor’s Professor, Dr. Aydogan Ozcan. Ozcan is creating portable and lightweight microscopes that affix to the mobile phones, thus transforming them into a platform for conducting microanalysis of blood, bodily fluids and water samples. With Dr. Ozcan’s vision and technology research, cellphones can become a mobile medical lab that can diagnose life-threatening diseases. Read More »

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Three Steps for IT to Deliver Better Business Results

The situation that many IT people find themselves in today is dripping with irony. They’ve deployed so many innovations over the years to address so many business challenges, that now most of their time is dedicated to simply keeping their systems running. Without incremental resources during these lean budget times, their new innovation cycles decline in direct proportion to their past innovations.

Given the current budget realities, how can IT break out of this innovation trap?

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