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Security and Insecurity in the Internet of Everything

October 9, 2013 at 1:22 pm PST

The Internet of Everything is a big thing, and it’s going to get bigger. As more devices, sensors, gadgets, and people get interconnected, you’ll hear more and more about it. But there’s one aspect of the Internet of Everything that I don’t hear a lot about.

That aspect is security, both in the form of actual security and the sense of security.

Let’s go back to the mid-1980s, when I got my start with computers. You could finally buy one and make it useful at home without being a programmer or a soldering wiz. Pre-packaged software was available to do all sorts of useful things, but the thing that stood out for me was financial software. You know, Sylvia Porter, Multiplan, or whatever worked with your brand of computer. (I was a weird kid; I even did mock tax returns in middle school civics class for extra credit.)

But there were a lot of people who would not think of doing their finances on their home computer, for fear of being hacked or having their identity and their money stolen electronically.

Now anyone who’s had a credit card replaced because their account information was compromised will know this is a valid concern, at times. But some of these folks using Quicken on their monochrome Macintosh 512 without any connection to the outside world were convinced that hackers would get in, perhaps through the power line (way before powerline Ethernet adapters).

It took the personal financial software industry (and the PC industry as a whole) a while to overcome the fear, uncertainty, and doubt (FUD) surrounding their products, to the point where people were comfortable storing their personal/sensitive information on a personal computer, connected or not. Fast forward to today when, according to Pew Research, over half of us bank online and about a third bank on our mobile phones.

mobile phone

As more people start to see what the Internet of Everything is about, they’re going to be excited, and eager to get involved. But they’re also going to have concerns and fears about all of this interconnectedness, and what it means for their privacy and security.

You’re not going to want hackers to make your fridge shut down, for example. But we shouldn’t cry over spoilt milk that isn’t necessarily going to happen.

There will be some genuine security issues, at least as long as humans are writing the code (and the documentation), but I expect there will be more fears of issues than actual issues. It’s like wars and rumors of wars. They can both be dangerous, but we can each take an active role in dealing with the latter.

As for me, I’m watching for where interconnectedness is growing fastest, and getting an elevator pitch ready to calm the nerves of my less-technical friends, coworkers, neighbors, the woman behind the counter at Five Guys, my landlord, etc.

Now I’m off to recharge my Pebble and Fitbit for the week, and make sure my unconnected fridge hasn’t turned itself off yet. But before I go…

What are you doing to prepare for the Internet of Everything? And where do you think the most FUD will come from? I’d love to hear your thoughts and predictions in the comments below

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Challenges of the Evolving Home Network [INFOGRAPHIC]

SteveGBlogBy Steve Gorretta, Product Manager, NMTG

Do you know how fast the Internet connection is coming in and out of your house?  If you are like most broadband subscribers in the US, the answer is “no.”  You probably also share the sentiment (and pain!) that regardless of how much you are paying, your ISP isn’t delivering the promised broadband speed.

These are just examples of what you’ll learn in our Bandwidth Consumption and Broadband Reliability whitepaper, published last year but now brought to life in this creative Cisco infographic which provides a visual snapshot of the challenges subscribers face with respect to the evolving connected home network.

When we conducted this research we gained insights into three main areas:   Read More »

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Cisco, Service Providers Aim to Reinvent the TV Experience With “Videoscape”

Coming soon, to you – The next-generation TV experience.

It’s called Videoscape.    

It’s a comprehensive TV platform for service providers.  It combines digital TV and online content with social media and communications applications to create a new, immersive home and mobile video entertainment experience.

And it’s from Cisco.

Announced today, Videoscape is an open platform that utilizes the cloud, the network and client devices to deliver new video experiences on the next-generation Internet.  Cisco introduced five product families that work in conjunction with its portfolio of network products and technologies.

  • The Videoscape media gateway for the integration of voice, linear and online video, high-speed data, Wi-Fi and network traffic routing.
  • The Videoscape IP set-top box, engineered to support all forms of video – pay TV, broadcast, premium channels, VoD and online — to new Web 2.0 applications.
  • Videoscape software clients that extend the Videoscape experiences to a wide variety of home and mobile devices, from connected TVs to tablets, smartphones and more.
  • The Videoscape Media Suite which offers full life-cycle content management offering service providers the ability to efficiently and cost-effectively manage and publish content across multiple screens.

For consumers, Videoscape offers:

  • Access to vast entertainment content sources, including broadcast, pay TV and online, that integrates the Internet, social media, communications and mobility. 
  • Ease of use
  • More sources of video to your screen
  • More social and interactive features
  • More choices for content on the go
  • Cisco quality of experience

Check it out!

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