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New Nexus 9300 Switches join the Nexus 9000 Series

It’s an exciting time in to be in our industry, especially as we witness how technology continues to reshape how we connect and communicate through a myriad of applications and devices not only within our own companies, but also with our customers and partners.

At the epicenter of this technological transformation, we continue to find that the network is what ultimately enables these applications and their users to connect. We also quickly find that if this same network is not ready to deal with the ever increasing influx of devices, new applications with varying traffic patterns, and 24  x 7 access from pretty much anywhere, it can quickly turn into an IT departments nightmare.

It is exactly to deal with these new types of requirements that the award-winning Nexus 9000 Series (made up of both the Nexus 9500 and Nexus 9300 portfolios) was introduced into the market almost 11 months ago. Now, over 600 customers have purchased this new switching family and are experiencing the positive impact that having a high performing, scalable, programmable, and resilient data center network has on application performance and overall user quality of experience in both traditional and Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) architectures.

Today we are happy to announce the addition of three new switches into the Nexus 9300 Series as well as a 6-port 40Gbps module to deliver more flexibility and form factor options to meet different architectural needs.  The new products are:

  • Cisco Nexus 9372TX: 1-rack-unit switch supporting 1.44 Tbps of bandwidth across 48 fixed 1/10-Gbps BASE-T ports and 6 fixed 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports
  • Cisco Nexus 9372PX: 1-rack-unit switch supporting 1.44 Tbps of bandwidth across 48 fixed 1/10-Gbps SFP+ ports and 6 fixed 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports
  • Cisco Nexus 9332PQ: 1-rack-unit switch supporting 2.56 Tbps of bandwidth across 32 x 40Gbps QSFP+ ports
  • 6-port 40 Gigabit Ethernet Module for the Nexus 93128TX, 9396TX , and 9396PX for connectivity options to meet your needs

These new switches deliver high performance, additional buffers, as well as support for VXLAN routing in a compact form factor. In addition to this, support for the Cisco Nexus 2000 Fabric Extenders has also been added to the Nexus 9300 portfolio. So if you already had Fabric Extenders in your data center or are looking for a scalable and operationally simplified architecture – you can now have the best of both worlds.

But it doesn’t end there – in case you missed it, Cisco recently announced the availability of the Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) making the creation of a more simplified, robust, application-centric infrastructure  a reality with the Nexus 9000 Series as the network foundation. You can read more about it here – in Craig Huitema’s blog, which outlines not only new products on the nexus 9000 series including 100Gbps on the Nexus 9500, but also how we have simplified the introduction of the Nexus 9000 and ACI into data centers through different ACI starter kits and bundles. In addition, for those of you that want to deploy the Nexus 7000 in combination with the Nexus 9300s, new bundles that bring together the Nexus 7000 and Nexus 9300 are also available.

As you can see, we continue to deliver the products and architectural options that will allow data centers of all sizes to address increasing and changing application requirements.  Between the Nexus 9300 and Nexus 9500 portfolios and their ability to be deployed into 3-tier, spine/leaf, or ACI architectures, customers can benefit from more connectivity options and a diverse set of form factors to meet varying data center needs. I invite you to learn more about the Nexus 9000 Series at www.cisco.com/go/nexus9000.

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UCS M-Series Design Principles – Why bigger is not necessarily better!

Cisco UCS M-Series servers have been purpose built to fit specific need in the data center. The core design principles are around sizing the compute node to meet the needs of cloud scale applications.

When I was growing up I used to watch a program on PBS called 3-2-1 Contact, most afternoons, when I came home from school (Yes, I’ve pretty much always been a nerd). There was an episode about size and efficiency, that for some reason I have always remembered. This episode included a short film to demonstrate the relationship between size and efficiency.

The plot goes something like this. Kid #1 says that his uncle’s economy car, that gets a whopping 15 miles to the gallon (this was the 1980s), is more efficient than a school bus that gets 6 miles to the gallon. Kid #2 disagrees and challenges Kid #1 to a contest. But here’s the rub, the challenge is to transport 24 children from the bus stop to school, about 3 miles a way, on a single gallon of fuel. Long story short, the school bus completes the task with one trip, but the car has to make 8 trips and runs out of fuel before it completes the task. So kid #2 proves the school bus is more efficient.

The only problem with this logic is that we know that the school bus is not more efficient in all cases.

For transporting 50 people a bus is very efficient, but if you need to transport 2 people 100 miles to a concert the bus would be a bad choice. Efficiency depends on the task at hand. In the compute world, a task equates to the workload. Using a 1RU 2-socket E5 server for the distributed cloud scale workloads that Arnab Basu has been describing would be equivalent to using a school bus to transport a single student. This is not cost effective.

Thanks to hypervisors, we can have multiple workloads on a single server so that we achieve the economies of scale. However there is a penalty to building that type of infrastructure. You add licensing costs, administrative overhead, and performance penalties.

Customers deploying cloud scale applications are looking for ways to increase the compute capacity without increasing the cost and complexity. They need all terrain vehicles, not school buses. Small, cost effective, and easy to maintain resources that serve a specific purpose.

Many vendors entering this space are just making the servers smaller. Per the analogy above smaller helps. But one thing we have learned from server virtualization is that there is real value in the ability to share the infrastructure. With a physical server the challenge becomes how do you share components in compute infrastructure without a hypervisor? Power and cooling are easy, but what about network, storage and management. This is where M-Series expands on the core foundations of unified compute to provide a compute platform that meets the needs of these applications.

There are 2 key design principles in Unified Compute:

1.) Unified Fabric
2.) Unified Management

Over the next couple of weeks Mahesh Natarajan and I will be describing how and why these 2 design principles became the corner stone for building the M-Series modular servers.

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Your Guide to Cisco at Oracle Open World 2014

OOW Banner

In the world of IT, Oracle OpenWorld (OOW 2014) stands out. If you’re one of the 60K IT professionals attending OOW 2014 next week, we invite you to join us in booth 721 where we’ll be showcasing Cisco’s Unified Computing System (UCS) and data center solutions that provide a superior platform for Oracle data bases and workloads. The Cisco booth will be jumping with theater sessions, demos and a video studio from which we’ll be streaming live interviews with Oracle ecosystem experts and luminaries.

Oracle VM Test Drive Workshop on Cisco UCS

We couldn’t wait to get started. We’re kicking off on Sunday, September 28th, with a free deep-dive session on Oracle VM on UCS. Attend to learn how Oracle Virtualization on UCS saves money and improves operationsCisco UCS was designed from the ground up for virtualized workloads, making it an ideal platform for Oracle VM and offering unique advantages for Oracle customers.

  • When: 10:00 am – 3:00 pm (lunch included)
  • Where:  Courtyard Marriott San Francisco Downtown (299 2nd Street, San Francisco, CA
  • Click here to register. 

theCUBE/Silicon Angle

theCUBE is the IT industry’s premier online video show. Hosts John Furrier, Dave Vallante and theCUBE analyst team will be broadcasting live from the Cisco booth. We kick off on Monday, September 29th at 10:15 am, U.S. Pacific Time, with Kim Stevenson, CIO of Intel, who will be interviewed following her keynote session with Mark Hurd. Other notable interviews will include:

  • Jim McHugh, Cisco VP of UCS Marketing with Intel’s Shannon Poulin, VP and GM, Data Center Group, on UCS innovation with Intel Xeon processors for Oracle solutions
  • Raghunath Nambiar, Cisco Distinguished Engineer will discuss the latest UCS benchmarks for Oracle workloads.
  • Key customers and partners including Oracle and NetApp

For more info, please visit full schedule.

Read More »

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ITD: Intelligent Traffic Director

Data traffic has grown dramatically in the recent years, leading to increased deployment of network service appliances and servers in enterprise, data center, and cloud environments. To address the corresponding business needs, network switch and router architecture has evolved to support multi-terabit capacity. However, service appliance and server capacity remained limited to a few gigabits, far below switch capacity.

ITD (Intelligent Traffic Director) is a hardware based multi-Tbps Layer 4 load-balancing, traffic steering and clustering solution on Nexus 7xxx series of switches. It supports IP-stickiness, resiliency, NAT (EFT), VIP, health monitoring, sophisticated failure handling policies, N+M redundancy, IPv4, IPv6, VRF, weighted load-balancing, bi-directional flow-coherency, and IPSLA probes including DNS. There is no service module or external appliance needed. ITD provides order of magnitude CAPEX and OPEX savings for the customers. ITD is available on Nexus 7000/7700 series in NX-OS 6.2(8) or later. It is available for demo on Nexus 5k/6k. ITD is much superior than legacy solutions like PBR, WCCP, ECMP, port-channel, layer-4 load-balancer appliances.

Example use-cases: Read More »

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Business Continuity and Workload Mobility for Private Cloud (Cisco Validated Design-Part1)

As a Cloud Architect, I’ve had the privilege to work with CTOs and CIOs across the globe to uncover the key factors driving Business Continuity and Workload Mobility across their cloud infrastructures. We’ve worked with enterprises, large and small, and service providers to answer their top five concerns in our new Business Continuity and Workload Mobility solution for the Private Cloud.

1) Can you provide business continuity, workload mobility, and disaster recovery for my unique mix of applications, with lower infrastructure costs and less complexity for my operations teams?  Yes.

2) Can you provide a multi-site design that reduces business outages and costly downtime, allowing my critical applications to be more secure and available? Yes.

3) Can my operations teams perform live migrations of applications across sites while maintaining user connections, security, and stateful services?  Yes.

4) Does your multi-site solution allow me to utilize idle standby capacity during “normal” operations, and reclaim that capacity as needed during an outage event?  Yes.

5)  Can your Cisco Validated Design greatly reduce my deployment risks and simplify my design process, saving my business significant time, money, and resources?  Yes.

 

A Proven Multi-site Design, Built on the Most Widely Deployed Cloud Infrastructure    

We addressed each of these pain points as we designed, built, and validated our new multi-site business continuity and workload mobility solution. Our multi-site solution is built upon Cisco’s cloud foundation, the Virtual Multi-service Data Center (VMDC) that’s been deployed at hundreds of the world’s top enterprises and service providers. In our latest VMDC release, we’ve extended our cloud design to support multi-site topologies and critical use cases for private cloud customers. This validated design simply connects regional and long-distance data centers within your private cloud to address some critical IT functions, including:

  • application business continuity across data center sites;
  • stateful workload mobility across data center sites, will maintaining user connections and security;
  • application disaster recovery and avoidance across data center sites; and
  • application geo-clustering and load balancing across data center sites.
Cisco business continuity and workload mobility for the private cloud -Cisco Validated Design

Choose the Cloud Infrastructure that Fits Your Unique Business Needs

The  VMDC Business Continuity and Workload Mobility solution (CVD Design Guide) is grounded in the reality of today’s cloud environment, providing different design choices that match your applications needs. We realize there is no “one size fits all” cloud design, that’s why we support both physical and virtual resources, multiple hypervisors and storage choices, and security compliant designs with industry certifications like FISMA, PCI, and HIPPA.

Key Factors Driving Business Continuity and Workload Mobility in the Private Cloud
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