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Engineers Unplugged (Episode 7): Halloween Edition Featuring Scary Architecture

October 31, 2012 at 1:56 pm PST

This week on Engineers Unplugged, we’re joined by EMC’s Caroline Yap Orloff (@cloudofcaroline) and VMware’s Massimo Re Ferre (@mreferre) as they take on the mythical single pane of glass. Can one architecture solve all of your problems? Watch and see.

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Top 4 Ways I Know My First Private Cloud is Successful

My users are happy:  Having clearly identified and targeted my end users (did I focus on  business application owners, trusted business IT folks, IT solutions team, or my administrators?), I can see that the adoption of the cloud automation is growing.  This does not mean they are able to do everything they want in my first cloud deployment, but it means they are getting value out of it and I can see the anticipated number of physical and virtual servers provisioned.  I also see deprovisioning occurring.  After a few months I might still see three times to the provisioning going on as deprovisioning. I also have other teams beyond the first deployment angling for their turn.

IT Operations / the Cloud Command Center are cautiously monitoring the people, processes and technology:  Let’s face it, getting into production was intense and we had to make tradeoffs.  We did not get everything we wanted in the first deployment.  We cut the tape and users jumped in the cloud pool.  We got lots of feedback.  We tweaked one or two things; we got even more feedback.  We breathed a sigh of relief.  We looked forward to chapter two and built long lists of what we wanted.  We adjusted our roadmap.  We reviewed the success, learnings and failures with our management.  We identified and quantified the ROI.  We realized that we had lots of work to do.  Our Data Center operational processes were so spread out among our staff.  We had to think very clearly about managing the change from routine to strategic and how our workforce needed to transition to new roles.

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How Much is This Gonna Cost? Price Models for IT Infrastructure

October 19, 2012 at 9:59 am PST

Steve Watkins, Guest Blogger

Steve Watkins is a Consulting Systems Engineer for Cisco Intelligent Automation for Cloud.  He came to Cisco as part of the newScale acquisition in 2011.  He has been helping customers manage the migration to IT as a Service (ITaaS) since 2004.

 

Showback and Chargeback have become increasingly hot topics for IT, especially infrastructure teams.  This is fuelled at least in part by the general acceptance of cloud computing, including private clouds and SaaS applications.   Chargeback (and even Showback) are great ways of affecting behavior of the consumers of IT.   It keeps consumers from demanding an unreasonable amount of services, and encourages them to use of what has already been invested in.  There is also a growing mandate from Finance to make IT accountable for its spend, or at the very least to justify any requests for further investment. So infrastructure teams find themselves in the unexpected position of defining prices for the services traditionally offered.   Most have no idea where to start.

Several vendors have produced offerings to help manage the showback/chargeback business case.  This post will not discuss any vendor in detail.  Instead, I want to talk about philosophy.

Broadly speaking, there are two major approaches to creating a price model for IT.  There is the Utility-based model, in which pricing derived from actual consumption of CPU cycles, RAM, bandwidth, storage, etc.  In this model, if you stood up a virtual machine for one week you would only pay for the actual amount CPU cycles and storage you consumed.

Alternately, there is Service-based pricing, which advocates a fixed price based on either the service itself or some other unit of measure such as hours, etc.  In this model, if you stood up a virtual machine for one week you would pay for how many hours the VM was active, whether you used it or not.

I always council my customers to adopt service-based pricing.  I think utility-based pricing is the wrong approach for IT departments, especially infrastructure teams.  Here are my reasons:

1.INFLEXIBLE – Utility pricing is asset based, and therefore assumes that the assets will remain more-or-less the same.  The model breaks down when you introduce changes, like renting infrastructure from public providers or changing service levels.  What about if I offer VDI next year?  That may mean two different types of pricing models, which gets even more complex.  A service-based pricing scheme works with all services.

2.POOR CAPACITY MANAGEMENT – by only charging for the CPU cycles you actually consume, it encourages users to stand up systems and leave them in place.. which is exactly what we don’t want.  Think of renting a car: you rent a car for 4 days but only drive it for a total of 3 hours, you still have to pay for all for days.  If I just paid when I actually drove it, I would keep it all the time.  We want to encourage users to return unused assets. Which leads to..

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Attend a Cloud Workshop by Cisco

I have previously blogged about the value of a having a Cloud Workshop to drive success for your first Private Cloud.   Well now Cisco’s Cloud & Systems Management Technology Group and Cisco Corporate IT will host a Workshop at the 11th International Cloud Expo.   Register to hear the best “true grit” about the Private Cloud.   I will be presenting with Rodrigo Flores, Joann Starke and Brian Cinque.

See you there.

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Top Five Differences between an Infrastructure Manager and a Cloud Management Solution

I get asked this question a lot.  Cisco has multiple exciting Converged Infrastructure solutions with partners.   There are actually two different software product “categories” covering the Infrastructure (or POD) Manager and the Cloud Management Solution.  Let dig a bit deeper in what the differences are.

OR

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