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Video Calling: The Case for Interoperability – Part 3

January 30, 2013 at 2:00 pm PST

Video calling is changing the world we live in.  Healthcare is using video conferencing to provide services by doctors to patients in rural areas or those too ill to travel.  Schools use video calling to enable their students to interact with experts and professionals across the country without having to leave the classroom.  And courts are increasingly using video communications for specialized skills, such as language interpretation.

All of these rapid advancements will make a greater impact if our technologies work together. In a recent Cisco study, two-thirds of respondents believe that innovation is what keeps companies growing, that innovation is fostered through interoperable devices, and that it’s better if companies agree to common standards without government intervention. As new technologies are formed, these innovations are the fuel for economic growth and community well-being.  It’s important to understand the role that interoperability plays in forming our technological foundation.

Interoperability infographic

 

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Optimize Your Video Adoption with Cisco TelePresence

Today I am pleased to announce Cisco TelePresence Optimized Conferencing, a new cost-effective solution for video conferencing and achieving high quality, standards-based video across the whole organization.  With this, we are addressing the business challenges customers have around managing multiple conferencing options and reducing the TCO for their internal and external communications.

How does it work? Cisco TelePresence Optimized Conferencing:

  • Economically scales-up video adoption by optimizing resource allocation—dynamically orchestrates the use of bridge resources, pools multiparty units, and provides the right level of service for every endpoint
  • Connects natively with Cisco Unified Communications Manager (UCM)
  • Supports everything from mobile clients to fully-immersive telepresence systems, ensuring a consistent video experience across endpoints

The result is an over 70 percent more efficient use of bridge resources in mixed mode (full HD, HD, SD) conferences. Delivered through software-only upgrades, it is available with the latest releases of Cisco TelePresence Conductor, Cisco TelePresence Server and Cisco TelePresence Management Suite (TMS).

As video adoption becomes more pervasive in enterprise organizations, telepresence solutions like this will be increasingly important for a successful video strategy, especially one that addresses the mobile and BYOD trends. We look forward to partnering with our customers to utilize Cisco TelePresence Optimized Conferencing for simple, cost-effective any to any video collaboration for the entire enterprise.

To learn more, visit the Optimized Conferencing webpage on Cisco.com.

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ACE Network: My Calls are now HD Video with the Cisco Jabber Client

It used to be that a video call meant going to a special room for a high-end video conference or putting up with the small webcam image on a laptop. Today, nearly all of the calls I handle at my desk are video calls because of the mid-range but very portable video meeting experience in the Cisco Jabber client.

ACE 5 - Pradeep_Jabber Video blog jpeg

Cisco Jabber Clients use the same video engine from Cisco Jabber Video for TelePresence (Movi). I use Cisco Jabber on our internal ACE network, where Cisco IT has been testing it as a new product before supporting it in production.

Being able to join a high-definition video call instantly, without having to schedule and wait, is more than just a convenience. It is becoming a necessity to conduct business these days and sometimes it’s the only way you can reach some people.

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New Year’s Resolution: Digital Diet

January 11, 2013 at 10:15 am PST

Today’s students are connected. This past holiday break, I was reminded just how much Gen Y (18-30 year olds) requires anytime access to the tools in their life.

I came to the realization that board games and cards may become a thing of the past.    If you don’t have a smartphone and/or tablet, you’re considered old school.  I do have one of the two so I’m only half old school.  Smartphones and technology have come a long way.  I still have a bunch of physical maps in my car from when I first moved to California.  I honestly don’t remember the last time I touched that stack of maps with built in navigation and point to point map applications in my phone that’ll take me where I need to go without having to plan the physical route myself beforehand. Read More »

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Reinventing Wealth Management with Technology-Enabled Video Services

The wealth management industry continues to face many challenges as it recovers from the financial crises of the past few years. And while financial markets have recovered most of their losses since 2008, investor confidence has not yet returned and volatility remains high.

Against this backdrop, investors now have access to a wide variety of investment information online, including analyst research, detailed company and sector financial reports, and data visualization tools previously available only to financial advisers. The combination of poor market performance, availability of information, and low-cost business models that put the investor in control are calling into question the fundamental value proposition of wealth management firms and their financial advisers.

To better understand the mind-set of wealthy investors, we conducted our first wealth management survey in January 2011. An important finding was uncovering a relatively young wealthy investor group we called “Wealthy Under-50s.”

As we shared the findings with our customers, new questions arose including:

  •  Is there a desire for technology-enabled interactions among younger wealthy investors?
  • Given that many clients value face-to-face meetings with their advisers, how often would they use a high-quality video option?
  • Is there a “right way” to deploy technology-enabled services and capabilities?
  • Would video services convince wealthy investors with no adviser to hire one?
  • What are the main barriers to the adoption of technology-enabled services?

To answer these questions and provide additional insights about wealthy investors, we conducted our second survey 18 months later, in April 2012.  The findings show rapidly shifting attitudes about wealth management and technology-enabled services. Specifically, we found:

  • After only 18 months, the behaviors and attitudes of the Under-50s in the first survey now extend up to age 55 (“Wealthy Under-55s”).
  • Although Wealthy Under-55s meet more often with their financial advisers, they are less satisfied with those interactions than older investors.
  • Wealthy Under-55s want more personalized investment recommendations, access to more diverse opinions and expertise, and more frequent access to their financial advisers than they currently receive.
  • Wealthy Under-55s believe that technology-enabled services that feature video-enabled access to financial advisers would provide them with better advice and more satisfying interactions than they receive right now.
  • Wealthy Under-55s are much more willing to change advisers.  Twenty-percent of them indicated they were likely to change their primary adviser in the next year, compared to only 4 percent of investors over the age of 55.

And perhaps most important for financial services firms looking to capture a share of this market, Wealthy Under-55s are willing to move at least some of their assets to firms that provide these services (57 percent in the United States, 54 percent in Germany, and 51 percent in the United Kingdom). Read More »

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