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How Many Internet Connections are in the World? Right. Now.

Right now, in 2013, 80 “things” per second are connecting to the internet.  Next year that number will reach almost 100 per second, and by 2020, more than 250 things will connect each second.

Add all of these numbers up, and we believe that more than 50 billion things  will be connected to the internet by 2020.  Today we’re launching the Cisco Internet of Everything (IoE) Connections Counter so that we can watch in real time as everything comes online.

By the way, what are all of these “things”?  Mobile devices, parking meters, thermostats, cardiac monitors, tires, roads, cars, supermarket shelves, and yes, even cattle.   The list is endless, and it just keeps getting longer and more interesting.  Literally, by the second.

Even more exciting is when all of these things are combined with people, process and data via the network to deliver transformational value to the world by improving the way we make decisions, saving us time and money, and so much more.  That’s the Internet of Everything, and its value increases every time we connect the unconnected.

So we’re paying close attention.  The connections counter will help us keep track of exactly where we are in this journey, starting now and continuing through 2020.

We encourage you to keep track as well.  Cisco invites journalists, analysts and other interested parties to check out the IoE Connections Counter and to feature it in your own content.

Let the countdown to 2020 and 50 billion connections begin!

Our methodology: To estimate the number of connected objects during 2013-20 we first estimated the total number of ‘things’ in the world and then determined the proportion of connected things. For 2012, we had estimated the total number of ‘things’ in the world to be 1.5 trillion and the number of connected objects to be 8.7 billion, implying 0.6% penetration rate of connected objects. We expect the number of things to reach 1.8 trillion in 2020, growing 3% annually. Subsequently, we have assumed that connectivity costs will decline by 25% annually during 2013-20. Conservatively, we assume the price-elasticity of demand to be ~1 and consequently expect annual growth in number of things to be 25% CAGR during 2013-20. Based on these assumptions, we estimate that the number of connected objects to reach ~50 billion in 2020 (or 2.7% of the total things in the world).

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Solving the Network Location Problem with LISP

July 24, 2013 at 11:12 am PST

Your Location Has Changed, Carry On!

Solving the Network Location Problem with LISP (Locator/Identifier Separation Protocol)

The first thing that comes to mind when someone mentions location is our GPS location. Our ability to roam around the earth with our mobile devices is something many of us take for granted. However, at the packet level on the Internet of Everything (IOE), trying to map the network location of a trillion new things may require some new thinking.

Wibbly Wobbly - by Andrew Heath

Wibbly Wobbly -- by Andrew Heath

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Internet of Everything: Connecting your city, one home at a time

“Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how.”

- Edward T. McMahon

Does your housekeeping list look like mine? Turn on the lights. Take out the trash. Clean the living room. The list could go on.

Have you noticed that how we perform these simple, daily tasks is changing? Smart utilities are replacing our old ones. Home automation is on the rise. Smart appliances that make our lives easier are now for sale and coming home with us.

At first glance, this influx of new capabilities has a novel appeal. After all, who doesn’t want a refrigerator to make their grocery list? I know I do. However, a second look reveals deeper potential. Potential that allows us to achieve sustainability across an entire community.

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Increasing the Value and Relevance of Data in Motion

If you’ve been following my past blogs and presentations, you’ve heard me talk about “Data in Motion.” That’s the catch-all term used to describe the swelling flood of data that is at maximum value while still in motion (and often at that fleeting moment in which it is created). Data in Motion requires rapid, real-time response in order to provide actionable insights at the right place and at the right time. Done right, it can be evaluated in meaningful ways that lead to knowledge and wisdom. But even a slight delay in reacting to it can mean the data loses its value.

Data in Motion is a completely different animal than the persistent, static “data at rest” that is the subject of Big Data today. And, so far, Data in Motion has gone largely untapped. Retailers could tap Data in Motion to send targeted alerts and promotions in real time to shoppers. Healthcare providers could use it to remotely monitor patients in their homes. Manufacturers could harness it for process monitoring and control. My friend Rick Smolan and I recently shared some inspiring examples of how Data in Motion and data in general have changed people’s lives. If you haven’t already seen it, you can watch our conversation here.

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Industrial IP Advantage the IT and OT Broker

The IT (Information Technology) and the OT (Operational Technology) “worlds” are requiring convergence to meet the growing complexity of a more informed customer driven market. Not only in the technical sense, but also organizationally. 

I don’t know about you, but trying to keep up with the alphabet soup of acronymous in one world is difficult enough, but when we attempt to combine both “worlds” it can be  nauseating to say the least, and produce a terrible “soup” of acronyms   I mean both organizations speak different languages, right?  OEE, EOL, CNC, MTTR, EtherNet/IP, etc.. for OT, and  SNAP, OSPF,  EOF, NAT, IP etc.. for IT. The IT world is more formal too, right?  For example, IT SIP’s and OT umm ……..CIP’s.

Can you imagine the language and cultural challenges of both worlds trying to understand each others language let alone work jointly to execute programs and projects that drive business value for their company’s and markets?  I’ve heard in some organizations that proposition often times causes a bigger confrontation than the epic Ali vs. Frazier “Thrilla in Manila” battle, but it doesn’t have to be that way.  In fact, the Industrial IP Advantage website is an educational community of both IT and OT professionals. A IT and OT broker if you will.  You will find that the two worlds are not so different.IIPA Logo

 
Paul Brooks, Rockwell Automation; Dan McGrath, Panduit and Kevin Davenport of Cisco discuss how OT and IT professionals can leverage the Industrial IP Advantage community to accelerate the adoption of IP technology to converge both “worlds” and extract tangible value from the IoE opportunity.

Left to right: Philippe Beaulieu, Dan, Peter Brookes, Kevin Davenport

Left to right: Philippe Beaulieu (Librestream), Dan McGrath (Panduit), Paul Brooks (Rockwell Automation), Kevin Davenport (Cisco)

The IT and OT worlds have more commonality than differences.  In fact, one of the common areas of focus for both worlds revolve around “standardization.”  Historically, OT technology projects and deployments have leveraged modified Ethernet implementations to connect machines, sensors and the like on plant floors.  This approached has produced many different flavors of industrial modified ethernet protocols, such as, ProfiNet, EtherCAT, Powerlink, etc.. Although these ethernet implementations allowed manufacturers to move further away from costly, difficult to maintain, and hard to scale proprietary technology the industry recognizes that a more universal standard technology approach is required to take advantage of the Internet of Everything (IoE) revolution and the 3.88 trillion dollar of manufacturing value associated with the IoE opportunity.  That standard technology foundation is Internet Protocol (IP).

By using the power of standard, unmodified Internet Protocol (IP) manufacturers finally have a universal technology platform that improves connectivity between people, partners and processes, devices, departments and systems in industrial applications, and opens up new opportunities for productivity, efficiency and flexibility. Industrial IP Advantage is an idea and resource to bridge the language and cultures barriers of IT and OT together and  drive the business and technical values required to meet the demands of the new consumer.

Please register for the community and join a growing community of your IT and OT peers who are innovating, learning and accelerating the adoption of IP to shorten their design cycles, drive supply chain agility, connect in more meaningful ways with customers and drive increased profit for their company.  In addition, you’ll have fun learning a new language.

 

 

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