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Key to Service Provider Success: Transformation Through Innovation

kelly“We are going through unprecedented change in the service provider industry – and it’s increasingly becoming a mobile and cloud-based world, with competition around every corner,” Kelly Ahuja, senior vice president of Cisco’s service provider business, told 70 international journalists during Cisco’s third annual Global Editors Conference in downtown San Jose earlier this week.

“Change is the lone constant,” he continued, “with several major trends driving dramatic impact on every player in the industry.”

Ahuja then chronicled several trends impacting the industry. The world has gone mobile, forever altering customer expectations and the rise in cloud computing is dramatically transforming telecom infrastructures, he noted. Also, he said machine-to-machine Internet of Everything (IoE) experiences are at the cusp of wide-scale proliferation in many markets and video continues to drive global IP traffic growth at a clip of 23 percent global CAGR.

Three Keys to Success: Increase Revenue, Reduce Opex, Enhance Service Agility

Each service provider faces unique geographic and competitive challenges, but according to Ahuja, they are all looking for three things from their technology solutions. “Operators want to improve their top lines,” he said. “They also need to reduce their spending, particularly Read More »

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GLOBECOM 2014

December 3, 2014 at 12:42 pm PST

Dan Crawfordby Dan Crawford, Marketing Manager, Cisco

It has been nearly 20 years since I last heard the static and ding-guh-donga-dong sounds of dialing up wireline internet, over 14 years since the first digital “2G”phones became available, about eight years since “3G” networks were widely deployed, and five years since 4G LTE rolled out in the U.S.

Following the trend of the past two decades, logic would propose thatwe are due for another major leap forward in networking and communications technology.  One place to learn about the latest advancements Read More »

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Pathway to a Cloud-Ready Wide-Area Network (WAN)

Tighter Planning Cycles for Greater Efficiency with the Evolved Services Platform

In the global geography of telecom, wide-area networks (WAN) are oceans of uncertainty. Resource-constrained and multivendor, WANs produce delays and outages in far-flung and sometimes remote areas, posing a special set of issues that are distinct from those we see in data centers and access networks.

WAN bandwidth is the most expensive bandwidth in the network and failure impacts are large. WANs bear the brunt of traffic growth with a very tricky calculus: underbuild your WAN and jeopardize your brand, but overbuild it and spend your way into oblivion.

Greater Predictability through Ever-Shortening Planning Cycles

To keep pace with these conundrums, you need sophisticated modeling and planning tools, which naturally evolved—in the case of the WAN Automation Engine (WAE)—into an ever-tightening loop of planning, building, and measuring, eventually encompassing SDN.

Longer planning cycles inevitably means over-engineering, over-building and over-hiring. With the Evolved Services Platform’s (ESP) Orchestration Engine, Cisco is shrinking these cycles, and thus reducing the uncertainties that lead to inefficiencies.

Last week I discussed the Orchestration Engine of the ESP in terms of how different components fit in individual domains. Let’s see how to use this framework to plan, engineer, and ultimately automate the WAN to make it cloud-ready.

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As the Process Becomes More Automated, a Shrinking Planning Cycle Brings Huge Efficiencies.

The cycle progressively shortens, from years to months, and eventually (with automated, programmable networking) to continuous changes. As this process moves from manual to automated, the network becomes more predictable.

But Why is this Happening Now? Read More »

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Cisco Continues Market Share Leadership in Mobility – First in Mobile IP Infrastructure, Packet Core, Mobile Backhaul, and Mobile IP Core

Over the summer, we shared with you the results of an ACG Report showing Cisco as the market share leader in Mobility.

Then and today the usage of mobile devices has been on the rise. Unequivocally.

The average smartphone user is accessing 26.8 apps every month for about 30.25 hours, an increase of 65 percent from two years ago. On their first weekend of offering the iPhone 6, Apple sold more than 10 Million units. Global smartphone market is forecasted to rise by around 20% to 1.2 billion units during 2014.

ACG Research came out with a new report recently the highlights of which I want to share with you. In this report Ray Mota notes that the Worldwide Mobile IP Infrastructure Market continues to rebound in Q2, 2014. It actually grew in Q2, increasing to $1.25 billion, a 9.6 percent quarter over quarter. Evolved Packet Core (MME, PGW, SGW, and PCRF) also grew this quarter to $123 million, a 7.2 per cent quarter over quarter.

ACG Research maintains its views that online video continues to fuel mobile data traffic and the industry expects a tenfold increase in five years.  Mobile spending continues and is increasing globally as carriers in developed countries vie for top billing for fastest carrier, fueling LTE spending. 3G remains strong and continues to grow as developing economies upgrade and invest in this technology. Mobile infrastructure will continue to be a highly dynamic market for the next several years as vendors and carriers work through new technologies.

Cisco maintains its position of market share leader. The Read More »

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What’s in the Cisco Evolved Services Platform’s Orchestration Engine?

We created the Evolved Services Platform (ESP) to help our customers increase service revenue while driving down costs. In doing so, we needed to make it expansive to include the breadth of technologies and solutions that would apply to many domains (such as access, Wide Area Network (WAN), and data center) and technologies (such as cloud, security, and video).

And we addressed the fact that a virtualized network function (VNF) is only as good as the automation of orchestration capabilities that are used spin it up and expand it to fit the required job. Given all the VNFs (greater than 40, just counting our own) that we could conceivably be orchestrating, we had to ensure that the Cisco ESP was sufficiently broad and inclusive of multivendor technologies.

The following diagram shows the big picture—the applications and network services made possible by an open, elastic, and application-centric architecture. Read More »

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