Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Perspectives

#CiscoChampion Radio S1|Ep11 Mobility and Connected Mobile Experiences (CMX)

#CiscoChampion Radio is a podcast series by Cisco Champions as technologists, hosted by Cisco’s Amy Lewis (@CommsNinja). This week Bob Friday, VP CTO Mobility at Cisco, joins Cisco Champions Sven Kutzer and Stephen Rodriguez. The topic is Mobility and Connected Mobile Experiences (CMX). This week Cisco’s Lauren Friedman (@Lauren) guest hosts.

Listen to the Podcast

Cisco Subject Matter Expert:
Bob Friday, VP CTO Mobility at Cisco

Cisco Champions:
Stephen Rodriguez, Wireless Engineer (@WiFiJanitor)
Sven Kutzer, Senior Systems Engineer (@SvenKutzer)

Highlights:
Foundation of the Connected Mobile Experience (CMX)
How CMX applies to transportation, retail and hospitality
Where we’re going with indoor location technology, from probe based location to network based and network assisted track
Standardization of location technology
Surprising CMX deployment examples Read More »

Tags: , , , ,

From Cisco Network Academy student to Cisco Champion

I was selected as a Cisco Champion for the year 2014. Becoming a Cisco Champion is a privilege for Cisco enthusiasts and experts who are passionate about sharing, teaching, and discussing (Cisco) network technologies. In this blog post, I want to tell you about the road I took from my first CCNA classes (Cisco Network Academy) to becoming a Cisco Champion.

My networking career started ten years ago with Cisco Network Academy. In those days, Cisco Network Academy was a pretty new learning ‘center’ but it had enough information to help you start your career in the networking field. At my university, we used Network Academy modules during the semester. We had 2 or 3 chapter exams every week! To gain more understanding about the theories, we were required to attend labs. During my university years I needed to study for the Network Academy exams every day. Not just every day, but really every day! That was not a problem though, because network technology is just awesome! Read More »

Tags: , ,

Summary: The Value of Certifications – A Top Five List

I hold Cisco certifications in high regard not only for providing excellent training for supporting Cisco products but for first and foremost providing a firm foundation and platform on which to grow as a network engineer.

Read my full article to find out my top five reasons for certifying.

Tags: , ,

The Value of Certifications – A Top Five List

AQ44451(1)

I’m new to the blog writing world but have been in the networking industry for several years now.  When I got started back in 2007, I was working my first job after graduating college and was recruited into a communications role, fresh out of the help desk, which I had landed the year prior. Cisco’s career certifications program literally picked up where schooling left off and helped me find my career passion and carve a path.  So here following, I’m going to give my top five reasons for certifying and continuing to climb Everest.

  1. As the saying goes, “You don’t know what you don’t know”. When you learn on the job, it’s one thing to get something implemented but it’s another to truly understand how it works. Certification forces you to go back and fill in the knowledge gaps. Read More »

Tags: , ,

Providing the Right Platform is Sometimes All it Takes

Change is the only constant. Except that it isn’t; constant that is. We are seeing changes to IT services, infrastructure, eco-systems, and business models, with consequent demands and expectations that we have not witnessed before. Cisco is responding to all of this with new technologies for the DevOps community, including APIs, development tools, training and more, all of which I discuss below.

The Economist likens this to the Cambrian era that saw the multiplication of life forms that populate our world today: “… this time is … different, in an important way. Today’s entrepreneurial boom is based on more solid foundations than the 1990s internet bubble, which makes it more likely to continue for the foreseeable future.”

What has made this possible, which the Economist illustrates with a variety of examples, is the ubiquity of communications and open source platforms in a “cloud” environment. The Economist lists these elements:

  • …snippets of code that can be copied free from the internet, along with easy-to-learn programming frameworks (such as Ruby on Rails).
  • … services for … sharing code (GitHub) …
  • … “application programming interfaces” (APIs), digital plugs that are multiplying rapidly …
  • … “platforms”—services that can host startups’ offerings (Amazon’s cloud computing), distribute them (Apple’s App Store) and market them (Facebook, Twitter).
  • … the internet, the mother of all platforms, which is now fast, universal and wireless.

What has also changed is that the IT stack is, in effect, collapsing. The “separation of concerns”, that kept the network infrastructure distinct from the applications running over it, is being whittled away. In October 2013 we teamed up Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,