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New Email Security Release Adds Graymail Protection, Web Interaction Tracking, AMP Threat Grid, and More

Each day more than 100 billion corporate email messages are exchanged1. Who doesn’t need to do a little housekeeping and eliminate unwanted emails? But you need to think twice before you click on “unsubscribe.”

As you likely read in the 2015 Cisco Annual Security Report, attackers are using applications users inherently trust or view as benign, like web browser add-ons, to distribute malware. One of the latest phishing techniques is graymail – directing the “unsubscribe” link at the bottom of a seemingly innocuous marketing email to a malware infested website. Many of us click on these links without a second thought. But instead of ridding ourselves of unwanted emails, we’re actually opening ourselves up to an attack.

This is just one example of how attackers continue to innovate, and Cisco does as well. Our new AsyncOS release for Cisco Email Security Appliance (Cisco ESA) demonstrates how Cisco empowers you with a threat-centric approach to security and more comprehensive management control.

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Understanding Logjam and Future-Proofing Your Infrastructure

On May 19th, 2015 a team of researchers (Henninger et. al) published a paper with the title “Imperfect Forward Secrecy: How Diffie-Hellman Fails in Practice”.

The paper can be divided in two sections: 1) discrete logs on a 512-bit Diffie-Hellman (DH) group, and 2) a new attack against the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol. We’ll review both sections. Read More »

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Little Links, Big Headaches

This post was authored by Earl CarterJaeson Schultz.

Talos is always fascinated by the endless creativity of those who send spam. Miscreants who automate sending spam using botnets are of particular interest. Talos has been tracking a spam botnet that over the past several months that has been spamming weight loss products, male erectile dysfunction medication, and dating/casual sex websites.  These are all typical products one would expect to be purveyed through spam. What interests us about this spam are some of the ways the spam is constructed to try and evade detection (a.k.a. spam filters).

Beginning in March, Talos noted an absolute explosion in the usage of link shortening services in spam. After looking into the cause we found botnet ‘unknown2250’, as it is called by the Composite Block List (CBL), to be one of the primary parties responsible for this massive increase.

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Trojanized PuTTY Software

This post was authored by Cisco CSIRT’s Robert Semans, Brandon Enright, James Sheppard, and Matt Healy.

In late 2013­­­–early 2014, a compromised FTP client dubbed “StealZilla,” based off the open source FileZilla FTP client was discovered. The attackers modified a few lines of code, recompiled the program, and disbursed the trojanized version on compromised web servers. This new attack appears to involve the same actors who reused the same techniques to alter the source code of the widely used open source Telnet/SSH client, PuTTY, and used their network of compromised web servers to serve up similar fake Putty download pages. This new campaign is like the StealZilla campaign in almost every way. Read More »

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IoT Security: Keep Calm and Connect On

Secuirty in IOT Experts Panel at LiveWorx 5-5-15

There’s a lot of hype around securing the Internet of Things (IoT). At the end of the day, I suggest that a more reasoned approach is in order. Securing the IoT will not be achieved by frantic worry about the volume of endpoints. Myopic focus on the volume of devices in an IoT ecosystem can lead to an important misstep: forgetting that it’s the Internet of Things. That means that all this data is passing through the network. Therefore, tackling security can only occur with diligent attention to the core of the IoT, namely, the network stack. In that way security can become as pervasive as the IoT itself.

I recently had the privilege of participating in a panel discussion at LiveWorx’s CXO Forum on Securing the IoT. Here are two predictions with respect to the IoT and security that I shared with the audience and my co-panelists at the event:

  1. Access and identity management will be critical in an IoT ecosystem. However, the username and password won’t be part of tomorrow’s approach: the password will die – and soon. It’s not radical to point out that passwords are insufficient on their own for authenticating access to sensitive data. I don’t think that means we’re going to go immediately to 21 levels of authentication, for example. We do need a human factor, and it can be biometric, or it can be at an endpoint. We’re familiar with straightforward biometrics such as the iPhone’s fingerprint scan, but there are also newer methodologies that track the exact way a human swipes a smartphone screen. We can leverage technologies such as this to enhance security in the IoT and its member devices.
  1. Our industry must work together in public-private partnerships to put a stop to the proliferation of regulations – country by country or region by region – that are creating a tangled web of laws, regulations, and guidelines around security. Conflicting guidance, standards, and regulations cause confusion rather than clarity. International standards bodies and government regulators should consider removing territorial blinders and revisiting the real mission: ensuring, to the greatest extent possible, that information and communications technology (ICT) are genuine and free from compromise and will not permit control over the operations for which they are used.

While strong international standards for IoT security and new authentication methods are just two pieces of the larger puzzle that will make IoT more secure, they are essential pieces. We at Cisco are working to make inroads in both these areas. Stay tuned.

IoT Truck

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