Cisco Blogs

Threat Research

  • Threat Roundup for August 31 to September 7


    September 7, 2018 - 0 Comments

    Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between August 31 and September 7. As with previous round-ups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

    As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

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  • Vulnerability Spotlight: CVE-2018-3952 / CVE-2018-4010 – Multi-provider VPN Client Privilege Escalation Vulnerabilities


    September 7, 2018 - 0 Comments

    Discovered by Paul Rascagneres.

    Overview

    Cisco Talos has discovered two similar vulnerabilities in the ProtonVPN and NordVPN VPN clients. The vulnerabilities allow attackers to execute code as an administrator on Microsoft Windows operating systems from a standard user. The vulnerabilities were assigned to the CVE IDs TALOS-2018-0622 / CVE-2018-3952 (NordVPN) and TALOS-2018-0679 / CVE-2018-4010 (ProntonVPN).

    The vulnerabilities are similar to a bug previously discovered by VerSprite in April 2018: CVE-2018-10169. That same month, both clients released similar patches to fix this flaw. However, we identified a way to bypass that patch. Despite the fix, it is still possible to execute code as an administrator on the system. The details section later on in this post will explain the first patch, why it was not successful, and how the editors finally fixed the problem.

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  • Vulnerability Spotlight: TALOS-2018-0560 – ERPNext SQL Injection Vulnerabilities


    September 6, 2018 - 0 Comments

    Overview

    Talos is disclosing multiple SQL injection vulnerabilities in the Frappe ERPNext Version 10.1.6 application. Frappe ERPNext is an open-source enterprise resource planning (ERP) cloud application. These vulnerabilities enable an attacker to bypass authentication and get unauthenticated access to sensitive data. An attacker can use a normal web browser to trigger these vulnerabilities — no special tools are required.

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  • Malicious MDM: Let’s Hide This App


    September 5, 2018 - 2 Comments

    Since our initial discovery of a malicious mobile device management (MDM) platform that was loading fake applications onto smartphones, we have gained greater insight into the attacker’s methods. We now know how the attacker took advantage of a common MDM feature and used an iOS profile to hide and disable the legitimate versions of the fake apps to force the use of the malicious stand-ins.

    Cisco Talos previously published two articles (here and here) on the subject. In the aforementioned campaigns, the attackers enrolled iOS devices into the MDM and used the devices to control the victim’s devices, deploying malicious apps disguised as the messaging services WhatsApp, Telegram and Imo, as well as the web browser Safari.

    After additional research, we now know that the attacker deployed the malicious apps after the actor deployed a profile on the enrolled devices and abused the age rating restriction functionality that exists on iOS devices. The age ratings for WhatsApp and Telegram are 12-plus and 17-plus, respectively. After the age rating limit was set to 9-plus, the installed legitimate applications disappeared from the device

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  • Threat Roundup for August 24-31


    August 31, 2018 - 0 Comments

    Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between August 24 and August 31. As with previous round-ups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

    As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

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  • Rocke: The Champion of Monero Miners


    August 30, 2018 - 0 Comments

    This post was authored by David Liebenberg.

    Summary

    Cryptocurrency miners are becoming an increasingly significant part of the threat landscape. These malicious miners steal CPU cycles from compromised devices to mine cryptocurrencies and bring in income for the threat actor.

    In this post, we look at the activity of one particular threat actor: Rocke. We will examine several of Rocke’s campaigns, malware, and infrastructure while uncovering more information about the actor. After months of research, we believe that Rocke is an actor that must be followed, as they continue to add new features to their malware and are actively exploring new attack vectors.

    Introduction

    Talos has written widely about the issue of cryptomining malware and how organizations should protect systems against this threat. We continue to actively research developments in this threat through research that includes monitoring criminal forums and deploying honeypot systems to attract these threats. It is through these intelligence sources that the Chinese-speaking actor which we refer to as “Rocke” came to our attention.

    Rocke actively engages in distributing and executing cyrptomining malware using a varied toolkit that includes Git repositories, HttpFileServers (HFS), and a myriad of different payloads, including shell scripts, JavaScript backdoors, as well as ELF and PE miners.

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  • Threat Roundup for August 17-24


    August 24, 2018 - 1 Comment

    Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between August 17 and August 24. As with previous round-ups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

    As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

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  • Picking Apart Remcos Botnet-In-A-Box


    August 22, 2018 - 1 Comment

    This blog post was authored by Edmund Brumaghin and Holger Unterbrink with contributions from Eric Kuhla and Lilia Gonzalez Medina.

    Overview

    Cisco Talos has recently observed multiple campaigns using the Remcos remote access tool (RAT) that is offered for sale by a company called Breaking Security. While the company says it will only sell the software for legitimate uses as described in comments in response to the article here and will revoke the licenses for users not following their EULA, the sale of the RAT gives attackers everything they need to establish and run a potentially illegal botnet.

    Remcos’ prices per license range from €58 to €389. Breaking Security also offers customers the ability to pay for the RAT using a variety of digital currencies. This RAT can be used to fully control and monitor any Windows operating system, from Windows XP and all versions thereafter, including server editions.

    In addition to Remcos, Breaking Security is also offering Octopus Protector, a cryptor designed to allow malicious software to bypass detection by anti-malware products by encrypting the software on the disk. A YouTube video available on the Breaking Security channel demonstrates the tool’s ability to facilitate the bypass of several antivirus protections. Additional products offered by this company include a keylogger, which can be used to record and send the keystrokes made on an infected system, a mass mailer that can be used to send large volumes of spam emails, and a DynDNS service that can be leveraged for post-compromise command and control (C2) communications. These tools, when combined with Remcos provide all the tools and infrastructure needed to build and maintain a botnet.

    Within Cisco’s Advanced Malware Protection (AMP) telemetry, we have observed several instances of attempts to install this RAT on various endpoints. As described below, we have also seen multiple malware campaigns distributing Remcos, with many of these campaigns using different methods to avoid detection. To help people who became victims of a harmful use of Remcos, Talos is providing a decoder script that can extract the C2 server addresses and other information from the Remcos binary. Please see the Technical Details section below for more information.

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  • Threat Roundup for August 10-17


    August 17, 2018 - 0 Comments

    Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between August 10 and August 17. As with previous round-ups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

    As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

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  • Microsoft Tuesday August 2018


    August 14, 2018 - 0 Comments

    Microsoft released its monthly set of security advisories today for vulnerabilities that have been identified and addressed in various products. This month’s advisory release addresses 62 new vulnerabilities, 20 of which are rated “critical,” 38 that are rated “important,” one that is rated moderate and one that is rated as low severity. These vulnerabilities impact Windows Operating System, Edge and Internet Explorer, along with several other products.

    In addition to the 60 vulnerabilities referenced above, Microsoft has also released a critical update advisory, ADV180020 which addresses the vulnerabilities described in the Adobe Flash Security Bulletin APSB18-25.

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