Cisco Threat Research Blog

Threat intelligence for Cisco Products

We detect, analyze, and protect customers from both known and unknown emerging threats

Threat Roundup for June 19 to June 26

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between June 19 and June 26. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20200626-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

Threat Roundup for June 5 to June 12

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between June 5 and June 12. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20200612-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

IndigoDrop spreads via military-themed lures to deliver Cobalt Strike

By Asheer Malhotra.

  • Cisco Talos has observed a malware campaign that utilizes military-themed malicious Microsoft Office documents (maldocs) to spread Cobalt Strike beacons containing full-fledged RAT capabilities.
  • These maldocs use malicious macros to deliver a multistage and highly modular infection.
  • This campaign appears to target military and government organizations in South Asia.
  • Network-based detection, although important, should be combined with endpoint protections to combat this threat and provide multiple layers of security.

What’s new?

Cisco Talos has recently discovered a new campaign distributing a multistage attack used to infect target endpoints with customized Cobalt Strike beacons. Due to the theme of the malicious documents (maldocs) employed, it is highly likely that military and government organizations in South Asia were targeted by this attack.

 

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Threat Roundup for May 29 to June 5

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between May 29 and June 5. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20200605-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

Threat Roundup for May 22 to May 29

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between May 22 and May 29. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

 

Reference

20200529-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

Dynamic Data Resolver (DDR) — IDA Plugin 1.0 beta

Executive summary

Static reverse-engineering in IDA can often be problematic. Certain values are calculated at run time, which makes it difficult to understand what a certain basic block is doing. If you try to perform dynamic analysis by debugging a piece of malware, the malware will often detect it and start behaving differently. Today, Cisco Talos is releasing the 1.0 beta version of Dynamic Data Resolver (DDR) — a plugin for IDA that makes reverse-engineering malware easier. DDR is using instrumentation techniques to resolve dynamic values at runtime from the sample. For the 1.0 release, we have fixed a couple of bugs, ported it to the latest IDA version, added multiple new features, plus a new installer script that automatically resolves all dependencies.

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Vulnerability Spotlight: Memory Corruption Vulnerability in GNU Glibc Leaves Smart Vehicles Open to Attack

By Sam Dytrych and Jason Royes.

Executive summary

Modern automobiles are complex machines, merging both mechanical and computer systems under one roof. As automobiles become more advanced, additional sensors and devices are added to help the vehicle understand its internal and external environments. These sensors provide drivers with real-time information, connect the vehicle to the global fleet network and, in some cases, actively use and interpret this telemetry data to drive the vehicle.

 These vehicles also frequently integrate both mobile and cloud components to improve the end-user experience. Functionality such as vehicle monitoring, remote start/stop, over-the-air-updates and roadside assistance are offered to the end-user as additional services and quality of life improvements.

 All these electronic and computer systems introduce a lot of different attack vectors in connected vehicles – Bluetooth, Digital Radio (HD Radio/DAB), USB, CAN bus, Wi-Fi and, in some cases, cellular. However, like any other embedded system, connected vehicles are exposed to cyber attacks and security threats. Some of the threats that connected vehicles face include software vulnerabilities, hardware-based attacks and even remote control of the vehicle. During some recent research, Cisco’s Customer Experience Assessment & Penetration Team (CX APT) discovered a memory corruption vulnerability in GNU libc for ARMv7, which leaves Linux ARMv7 systems open to exploitation. This vulnerability is identified as TALOS-2020-1019/CVE-2020-6096.

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The Wolf Is Back…

Cisco Talos has discovered a new Android malware based on a leak of the DenDroid malware family. We named this malware “WolfRAT” due to strong links between this malware (and the command and control (C2) infrastructure) and Wolf Research, an infamous organization that developed interception and espionage-based malware and was publicly described by CSIS during VirusBulletin 2018. We identified infrastructure overlaps and string references to previous Wolf Research work. The organization appears to be shut down, but the threat actors are still very active.We identified campaigns targeting Thai users and their devices. Some of the C2 servers are located in Thailand. The panels also contain Thai JavaScript comments and the domain names also contain references to Thai food, a tactic commonly employed to entice users to click/visit these C2 panels without much disruption.

We identified a notable lack of sophistication in this investigation such as copy/paste, unstable code, dead code and panels that are freely open.

Read more >>>

Threat Roundup for May 8 to May 15

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between May 8 and May 15. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

 

Reference

20200515-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.