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Threat Research

  • Threat Roundup for September 6 to September 13


    September 13, 2019 - 0 Comments

    Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between Sep. 6. to Sep 13. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

    As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

    Read More

    Reference:

    TRU09132019 – This is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

  • Watchbog and the Importance of Patching


    September 11, 2019 - 0 Comments

    By Luke DuCharme and Paul Lee.

    What Happened?

    Cisco Incident Response (CSIRS) recently responded to an incident involving the Watchbog cryptomining botnet. The attackers were able to exploit CVE-2018-1000861 to gain a foothold and install the Watchbog malware on the affected systems.

    This Linux-based malware relied heavily on Pastebin for command and control (C2) and operated openly. CSIRS gained an accurate understanding of the attacker’s intentions and abilities on a customer’s network by analyzing the various Pastebins. As the investigation progressed, CSIRS identified and de-obfuscated multiple pastes using artifacts left on compromised hosts.

    There were some attempts at obfuscation, such as base64 encoding URLs and Pastebins, but the attack was still relatively simple to uncover – this attacker did not practice particularly strong operational security.

    The attackers behind Watchbog claimed to be providing a service by identifying security vulnerabilities and aiding the organization by exploiting said weaknesses before any “real” hackers could do so. During the investigation, Cisco IR found signs of hosts becoming a part of a separate botnet around the time of the Watchbog activity. This raises serious doubts about the “positive” intentions of this adversary. Below is a message left on a compromised system by the adversary:

    Read more at Talosintelligence.com

  • Threat Roundup for August 30 to September 6


    September 6, 2019 - 0 Comments

    Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between Aug. 30 and Sep. 6. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

    As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

    Read More

    Reference:

    TRU09062019 – This is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

  • GhIDA: Ghidra decompiler for IDA Pro


    September 5, 2019 - 0 Comments

    Cisco Talos is releasing two new tools for IDA Pro: GhIDA and Ghidraaas.

    GhIDA is an IDA Pro plugin that integrates the Ghidra decompiler in the IDA workflow, giving users the ability to rename and highlight symbols and improved navigation and comments. GhIDA assists the reverse-engineering process by decompiling x86 and x64 PE and ELF binary functions, using either a local installation of Ghidra, or Ghidraaas ( Ghidra as a Service) — a simple docker container that exposes the Ghidra decompiler through REST APIs.

    Read more >>

  • The latest on BlueKeep and DejaBlue vulnerabilities — Using Firepower to defend against encrypted DejaBlue


    September 3, 2019 - 0 Comments

    Over the past few months, Microsoft has released several security updates for critical Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP)-related security bugs. These bugs are significant for IT infrastructure because they are classified as “wormable,” meaning future malware that exploits them could spread from system to system without requiring explicit user interaction. These vulnerabilities could be exploited by an attacker sending a specially crafted request to the target system’s Remote Desktop Service via RDP. We have seen how destructive these kinds of attacks can be, most notably WannaCry. We highly recommend organizations immediately apply Microsoft’s patches. Cisco Talos released detection coverage for CVE-2019-0708 and also enhanced guidance to help organizations facilitate inspection of RDP sessions here. Microsoft published additional security updates last month to mitigate two additional remote code execution vulnerabilities, CVE-2019-1181 and CVE-2019-1182, affecting several versions of Microsoft Windows. These bugs are referred to as “DejaBlue” due to their similarities to BlueKeep.

    Once again, Cisco Talos started working immediately to reverse-engineer the RCE vulnerabilities. Exploits and protections for both CVE-2019-1181 and CVE-2019-1182 now exist to keep your systems secure. SID 51369 for SNORT® correctly blocks exploitation of CVE-2019-1181 and CVE-2019-1182. In this post, we’ll run through the details of how to protect against this “DejaBlue” exploit and walk through the steps to protect your environment.

  • Threat Roundup for August 23 to August 30


    August 30, 2019 - 0 Comments

    Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between Aug. 23 and Aug. 30. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

    As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

    Read More

    Reference:

    TRU08302019 – This is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.