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Diving In: A How To Guide to Twitter

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Have you been thinking about becoming more active on Twitter and haven’t gotten around to it yet? Often, it can be difficult to dive in.  I’ve seen this often through planning a department wide social media plan, and I’ve gotten the same questions from both new hires and executives.

Common concerns I’ve heard are:

What do I talk about? Who do I follow? Will I get fired if I tweet the wrong thing?

These questions cause many to push social to the backburner again and again. But don’t quit just yet! The best way to answer these questions is observe and experiment.

These are my personal tips for establishing your profile:

Find social role models.

Look in your organization or industry for someone’s social style that appeals to you. Follow them and see how they set up their tweets. Once you look at a few, you’ll see a simple combination that you can use to model yours after.

Example:

karentweet2

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The Role of Executives in Employee Engagement: Crossing Your T’s and Dotting Your I’s

August 21, 2013 at 11:58 am PST

In our #ciscosmt Twitter chat yesterday, we talked about how to engage employees in social media. On a very high level, I presented the pillars of our program: identify, activate, recognize and measure. And previously, I blogged about a potential framework you can use for your own Social Ambassador program (that’s what we call our employee engagement program at Cisco).

At the end of the session, I offered 3 key takeaways for companies interested in starting or improving their employee engagement programs (these are all Twitter-friendly nuggets): Read More »

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Three Social Media Writing Tips. You Know You Want ‘Em!

1. Define Your Voice
Writing for social media is its own discipline and different from traditional writing: it is more like writing a story, a story that you want people to share with their friends and so on and so on. Defining your voice is the combination of knowing what you want to say and how you want to say it. Your knowledge, interests, and personality will only add value to the story. Plus, telling a story in your own way is what will create a unique and authentic connection with readers. One way to define your voice is to stop writing the way you think you should--you know, the way your English teacher told you to write--and start writing the way you think and speak. The words should fit you and be easy to read aloud.

2. Hook Your Audience from the Start
In addition to easy to read aloud, social media writing should be tighter and simpler than traditional writing: the beginning of your story should hook readers fast and hard, the way a song’s hook does. Whether you love or hate Queen, you know what comes after “we are the champions” (at least if you’re older than 25). That’s right, “no time for losers.” In essence, a hook is a memorable phrase that summarizes what a song is about. Think of a title and an opening line as your story’s hook. And don’t worry that you’re giving away the best part. Knowing what to expect won’t ruin your story for readers. It will prime them for what’s next and introduce your main point.

3. Construct Clear, Compelling Copy
Speaking of your main point, get to it quickly and clearly. While using a string of straightforward, declarative sentences is too abrupt for traditional writing, it is perfect for social media. Because unlike traditional writing, readers won’t go back to re-read or stop to think about difficult sections. Your writing has to be clear and direct the first time around: don’t be coy and promise to get to the interesting stuff later. Think of your story as a first date: put on your fancy pants and put forward your most compelling, date-worthy self. It’ll make your readers want to read your story and get to know you better. At the very least, it won’t make them regret saying yes.

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5 Tips To Make Better Videos

January 14, 2013 at 10:24 am PST

Having trouble keeping your audience engaged in the videos you create?

I know that you may think it’s the audiences fault for not catching onto the content, but maybe there’s something more to it. It can be hard to admit, but often times it is not your audience that has a problem…it’s actually you (or the videos you create rather).

More often than not, we as filmmakers get caught up in the actual production of the video and fail to take a step back to identify the best ways to communicate with our audience. Traditional methods of making videos, coupled with technical information, can spell disaster for most viewers. If you’ve been guilty of this it’s ok, really, because in the following video I’m going to give you a few tips to get you back in the good graces of your audience.

 

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5 Nuggets to Make Sense of the Crazy World of Social Media

November 28, 2012 at 6:00 pm PST

I presented at the BtoB Networking Breakfast (#BtoBNet) today and wanted to share my slides in this blog along with some food for thought based on my presentation:

  1. Not all social media participants will converse, comment or create. The Forrester social technographics ladder outlines 6 active social participation categories that also include people that are spectators (e.g., read your blogs), joiners (e.g., maintain a LinkedIn profile) or collectors (e.g., bookmark your content). Don’t lose sight of these groups when planning your social engagement.
  2. Lead with listening. I have spoken and written about this many times before and the new nugget here is that Read More »

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