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Connected Analytics: Capturing the Value of the Internet of Everything

Ten large oil refineries produce about 10 terabytes of data each day, which equates to the entire printed collection of the U.S. Library of Congress.

One modernized city the size of Singapore can generate about 2.5 petabytes of data every day, which translates to all U.S. academic research libraries combined.

And with more than 14 billion, data-transmitting devices connected to the Internet today, growing to 50 billion by 2020, it is little wonder that most of us are overwhelmed by this mind-boggling explosion of data.

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Turning this flood of raw data into useful information and even wisdom for better business decisions and quality of life experiences is what the Internet of Everything (IoE) is all about. This is a daunting task. According to IDC Research, just .5% of all data is used or analyzed, and online data volumes are doubling every two years from a combination of mobile devices, videos, sensors, M2M, social media, applications and much more.

Connected Analytics Portfolio

Last Thursday, however, Cisco unveiled our Connected Analytics portfolio for the Internet of Everything, a unique approach that includes software packages to bring analytics to the data, regardless of its location or whether it is in motion or at rest. This new generation of analytics tools for IoE can convert more and more data into valuable intelligence — from the inter cloud, to the data center to the network’s edge.

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Transforming Education with the Internet of Everything at San Jose State

Forward-thinking faculty members and staff at San Jose State University are using Internet of Everything technologies in innovative ways to transform education:

Project Assistant Quyen Grant is using Cisco collaboration technologies to expand learning across international borders, working with students and universities in Vietnam through the Social Work Education Enhancement Program (SWEEP); Advertising Professor John Delacruz is using Cisco TelePresence for his students to deliver final presentations to potential advertising clients who may be in remote locations. Julia Curry-Rodriguez, associate professor of Mexican American Studies, uses Cisco Lecture Capture to help non-native English speaking students improve their language skills.

These are just a few of the examples we learned about on December 10, 2014 at San Jose State University as they hosted global media, analysts, social media influencers, and Cisco for a series of roundtables that addressed how the Internet of Everything is impacting industries including education and the public and private sectors. Read More »

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The Future of Work: The Partnership Between HR and IT

The workplace is forever evolving.

With the widespread use of collaboration technology and the addition of Gen Y and Gen X employees, it’s knowledge workers who are driving changes in the workplace.

The emerging mantra is: Work is something you do, it is no longer someplace you go. (And if you do go to a traditional office, culture is a determining factor keeping employees happy and engaged!)

As such the definition of a workday is more flexible than ever before and employees are seeking work/life integration instead of work/life balance.

As these dynamics shift and the proliferations of new technology becomes more pervasive, creating a successful environment for the future of work will depend on a strong relationship between IT and HR at the executive level.

This creates an opportunity for HR and IT leaders along with the CIO to evolve from technology administrators to strategic business partners.

Recently, I had the chance to participate in a new Future of IT podcast with SAP’s Brigette McInnis-Day to discuss how IT and HR leaders could work together in this Future of Work landscape.

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When Partner Ecosystem Marketing Feels A Lot Like Walking a Tightrope

In my blog, Six “Must-Do”s for Successful Ecosystem Marketing, I talked about the challenge of maintaining harmony in the ecosystem. Ecosystem marketing manages a difficult balance between touting the virtues of the whole ecosystem and showing the value of individual partner relationships. It’s a tightrope and often somebody feels slighted if you are not careful in your approach.

Several different strategies exist when managing the ecosystem.  What works for one company, might not work for another. To stay balanced on that tightrope, have a game plan and make sure expectations are set properly with the partners. Determine which partner will be offered which marketing opportunities and why. The impact of the strategy can be far-reaching.  It will affect not only marketing program execution but can also impact partner relationships. Whether it’s web presence, content development, or even a partner pavilion at a tradeshow, partners will be sensitive to how they are positioned vis-a-vis other partners who are often their competitors.

At Cisco we have great deal of respect for our partner relationships. This is why we put a lot of thought into how to engage and involve our partners in programs. We want to make sure we are optimizing both Cisco’s and the partner’s investment of time, money and resources.

Besides knowing the ecosystem landscape, a key to developing the approach is to know the audience and objectives for the program.  In many cases, determining which partners will be most relevant to the intended audience naturally unfolds. Here are a few approaches: Read More »

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Key Considerations for Threat-Based Security Programs

As we often say at Cisco, every business is a security business. That’s been true ever since widespread online presence led to widespread cyber threats. It became even more applicable as those threats became more sophisticated and less detectable. And now, with the Internet of Everything (IoE), that phrase is more relevant than ever before.

Cisco estimates that by 2020, 50 billion devices will be connected, whether you know it or not. Other advances in technology, such as mobility and cloud computing, will require a new way of thinking about network security. In today’s world of IoE, security must be top of mind as the number and type of attack vectors continues to increase, as does the amount of data that needs to be protected. Take a look at three key considerations for building your security program.

First, it’s essential to understand what kinds of threats are coming at you, as well the motivation behind them. You cannot protect against what you cannot see. Second, you need application visibility and control; a real-time, accurate picture of devices, data, and the relationships among them that helps make sense of billions of devices, applications, and their associated information. And third, you need an adaptable, flexible security posture supported by some of today’s biggest innovations and brightest minds.

The IoE is creating a host of new security challenges. A risk mitigation strategy based on these key tenets is essential to securing your information assets. Please let me know your thoughts, experiences and strategies regarding this complex issue in the comments section.

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