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Open Source at The Large Hadron Collider and Data Gravity

I am delighted to announce a new Open Source cybergrant awarded to the Caltech team developing the ANSE project at the Large Hadron Collider. The project team lead by Caltech Professor Harvey Newman will be further developing the world’s fastest data forwarding network with Open Daylight. The LHC experiment is a collaboration of world’s top Universities and research institutions, the network is designed and developed by the California Institute of Technology High Energy Physics department in partnership with CERN and the scientists in search of the Higgs boson, adding new dimensions to the meaning of “big data analytics”, the same project team that basically set most if not all world records in data forwarding speeds over the last decade, and quickly approaching the remarkable 1 Tbps milestone.

Unique in its nature and remarkable in its discovery, the LHC experiment and its search for the elusive particle, the very thing that imparts mass to observable matter, is not only stretching the bleeding edge of physics, but makes the observation that data behaves as if it has gravity too. With the exponential rise in data (2 billion billion bytes per day and growing!), services and applications are drawn to “it”. Moving data around is neither cheap nor trivial. Though advances in network bandwidth are in fact observed to be exponential (Nielsen’s Law), advances in compute are even faster (Moore’s Law), and storage even more.  Thus, the impedance mismatch between them, forces us to feel and deal with the rising force of data gravity, a natural consequence of the laws of physics. Since not all data can be moved to the applications nor moved to core nor captured in the cloud, the applications will be drawn to it, a great opportunity for Fog computing, the natural evolution from cloud and into the Internet of Things.

Congratulations to the Caltech physicists, mathematicians and computer scientists working on this exciting project. We look forward to learning from them and their remarkable contribution flowing in Open Source made possible with this cybergrant so that everyone can benefit from it, not just the elusive search for gravity and dark matter. After all, there was a method to the madness of picking such elements for Open Daylight as Hydrogen and Helium. I wander what comes next…

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Thoughts on #OpenStack and Software-Defined Storage

May 14, 2014 at 6:18 am PST

This week has been the semi-annual OpenStack Summit in Atlanta, GA. In a rare occurrence I’ve been able to be here as an attendee, which has given me wide insight into a world of Open Source development I rarely get to see outside of some interpersonal conversations with DevOps people. (If you’re not sure what OpenStack is, or what the difference is between it and OpenFlow, OpenDaylight, etc., you may want to read an earlier blog I wrote that explains it in plain English).

On the first day of the conference there was an “Ask the Experts” session based upon storage. Since i’ve been trying to work my way into this world of Programmability via my experience with storage and storage networking, I figured it would be an excellent place to start. Also, it was the first session of the conference.

During the course of the Q&A, John Griffith, the Program Technical Lead (PTL) of the Cinder project (Cinder is the name of the core project within OpenStack that deals with block storage) happened to mention that he believed that Cinder represented software-defined storage as a practical application of the concept.

I’m afraid I have to respectfully disagree. At least, I would hesitate to give it that kind of association yet. Read More »

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Cisco, Linux Foundation, and OpenSSL

The recent OpenSSL Heartbleed vulnerability has shown that technology leaders must work together to secure the Internet’s critical infrastructure. That’s why Cisco is proud to be a founding supporter of the Linux Foundation initiative announced yesterday (April 24th).

The initiative will fund open source projects that are critical to core computing and Internet functions, and Cisco sees security technologies as a fundamental infrastructure component. The first project being considered for funding is OpenSSL. As a longtime contributor to open source and user, we’ve offered code and intellectual property to enhance OpenSSL. We’ve also provided patches and testing results to help address vulnerabilities. Today’s announcement takes that commitment a step further.

We are pleased to help form a critical mass of governance, funding, and focus that will support the output of open source communities like OpenSSL. By working together as an industry, we can expect greater security, stability, and robustness for components that are critical to the Internet.

For more Cisco-specific information on the Heartbleed vulnerability, please visit our event response page and Security Advisory. You may also be interested in our April 23 webinar titled, Heartbleed: Assessing and Mitigating Your Risk.

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Open Source Acceleration for Applications

In previous blogs I have described how organizations are maturing beyond provisioning of individual servers to provisioning of richer cloud-based application stacks.  Known as platform-as-a-service (PaaS), this capability takes cloud technology beyond infrastructure to automate the application life cycle.  PaaS allows developers and IT operations to collaborate and ensure that application stacks are consistent and delivered to your customers — within minutes.

Last summer at CiscoLive Orlando, the Application Stack Accelerator for Cisco Intelligent Automation for Cloud (IAC) was introduced and we quickly noticed that PaaS was an extremely popular topic!   This popularity has grown.  The demand for PaaS is heavy as organizations, probably like yours, look to extend cloud automation to the design, configuration and implementation of the application life cycle.       Read More »

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The First Open Source Project to Win the Interop Grand Prize…

… is none other than…  (drum roll, please!) … our one year old baby, OpenDaylight! My heartfelt congratulations go to the OpenDaylight committers and contributors, the open source collaborators who have poured their heart and soul into this wonderful project. This is indeed a remarkable event, considering the skepticism surrounding its start just about one year ago, in fact at Equinox. The Interop and OpenDaylight announcement captures the meaning of this accomplishment very well and on behalf of the OpenDaylight partners, I would like to thank the developers and users, to wish them continued success and strong adoption. Know that as long as core open source principles are alive and well our project will do well. Thank you, Interop panelists and conference attendees, and most of all, thank you Cisco colleagues, customers, and partners for building and embracing the base of what promises to be a star project. I am so proud of you!

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