Cisco Blogs

Cisco Blog > Security

Attackers Slipping Past Corporate Defenses with Macros and Cloud Hosting

Macro malware is a good example of malware writers and distributors using old tricks that most users have forgotten to spread malware. Unlike earlier macro malware, these macros don’t infect other documents but download password stealing trojans and install them on targets. Macro malware typically arrives via email with an attachment that contains a macro-based phishing attack in the form of an MS Office document (usually Word or Excel). The malicious code is written using the older Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) scripting language.

What makes the current versions of macro malware particularly dangerous is that the code is often heavily obfuscated, making detection difficult. Furthermore, once the document is opened and macros are enabled, the malware installs and begins to monitor Internet Explorer, Chrome, and Firefox browser activities with the capability of grabbing screenshots and logging keystrokes. The attacker’s ultimate goal is stealing these login credentials that give access to corporate and financial data.

Distribution of malware by email using malicious Word and Excel files containing macros is on the rise. Popular malware used by cyber criminals including Dridex, Vawtrack, Betabot, and Rovnix have been distributed using this tactic. Based on data analyzed by Cisco Managed Threat Defense Team, email attacks where macros are the method of infection are up 50% from February and have more than doubled since October of last year.


Email Attacks per Month

Keep reading to learn more about Email Attacks Using Malicious Macros

Tags: , , , , ,

Fiesta Exploit Pack is No Party for Drive-By Victims

This post was also authored by Andrew Tsonchev and Steven Poulson.


Update 2014-05-26Thank you to Fox-IT for providing the Fiesta logo image. We updated the caption to accurately reflect image attribution.

Cisco’s Cloud Web Security (CWS) service provides TRAC researchers with a constant fire hose of malicious insight and now that we are collaborating with Sourcefire’s Vulnerability Research Team (VRT) we have additional capabilities to quickly isolate and prioritize specific web exploit activity for further analysis. Thus when we were recently alerted to an aggressive Fiesta exploit pack (EP) campaign targeting our customers, we quickly compared notes and found that in addition to the typical Java exploits, this EP was also using a Microsoft Silverlight exploit. In the Cisco 2014 Annual Security Report (ASR) we discuss how 2013 was a banner year for Java exploits, and while updating Java should remain a top priority, Silverlight is certainly worth patching as threat actors continue to search for new application exploits to leverage in drive-by attacks.

Fiesta Exploit Pack

Image provided courtesy of Fox-IT

Over the past 30 days this specific Fiesta campaign was blocked across more than 300 different companies. The attacker(s) used numerous dynamic DNS (DDNS) domains – that resolved to six different IP addresses – as exploit landing pages. The chart below depicts the distribution of hosts used in this attack across the most blocked DDNS base domains.

CWS Fiesta Blocks by Distinct Requests

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,