Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Mobility

All 802.11ac Vendors are the same…Right?

If you are an Enterprise IT Manager, this is a question that you must ask yourself if you are considering deploying 802.11ac for your enterprise wireless network. 802.11ac has some great benefits such as wirelike speed and being able to handle a high concentration of clients. However, there is more to consider when deploying 802.11ac. For instance, how do I handle RF interference now that 802.11ac support 80MHz channels? Will legacy devices such as 802.11g/a/n allow me to achieve the best performance that 802.11ac advertises? How can I ensure that my users get the best wireless performance when they roam across a building? And lastly, as more clients join the network, is my performance going to suffer? These are all valid concerns and are something that Cisco addresses with HDX. HDX is High Density Experience and is part of Cisco’s 802.11ac solution. We just wrapped up a 4 part blog series on HDX where we answer these questions:

-          For Interference Mitigation, we have CleanAir for 80MHz Channels

-          Getting the best performance out of your network even with legacy clients, we  have ClientLink 3.0 Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

HDX Blog Series #2: Scaling with Turbo Performance

Editor’s Note: This is the second of a four-part deep dive series into High Density Experience (HDX), Cisco’s latest solution suite designed for high density environments and next-generation wireless technologies. For more on Cisco HDX, visit www.cisco.com/go/80211ac.  Read part 1 here

With any new technology comes a new set of obstacles to overcome.  802.11ac is no exception.  Last week we talked about CleanAir for 802.11ac and why spectrum intelligence still matters. Another challenge is scalability. In this post I will give you some details on new HDX feature, Turbo Performance, which allows the AP 3700 overcome common scaling issues to scale amazingly well.

What’s Different with 802.11ac?

802.11ac means higher data rates, which means more packets per second (PPS).  There are three reasons for more PPS with 11ac: wider channels, increased modulation and increased aggregation.  Channel width doubled to 80 MHz, modulation increased from 64 QAM to 256 QAM, and aggregation increased from 64k to 1MB!

With 802.11n, an AP might have had to push 30,000 1500 byte packets per second through the APs data plane. Today with 802.11ac that could now be 75,000+ PPS.  More PPS means more load on the APs CPU, so to really keep up with the demands of 802.11ac, we needed to go back to the drawing board.   Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

HDX Blog Series #1: Why Spectrum Intelligence Still Matters

Editor’s Note: This is the first of a four-part deep dive series into High Density Experience (HDX), Cisco’s latest solution suite designed for high density environments and next-generation wireless technologies. For more on Cisco HDX, visit www.cisco.com/go/80211ac

CleanAir for 802.11ac:  Why Spectrum Intelligence Still Matters

In wireless networking and communications, as with life, nothing good comes for free. It’s well known that the primary feature of the new IEEE 802.11ac amendment is support for an 80 MHz-wide channel. The benefit of an 80 MHz channel is the potential to double usable throughput in comparison to that of 802.11n using a 40 MHz wide channel.

However, what is less well known is that a wider RF channel is also more susceptible to interference. In other words, 802.11ac devices “hear more” than 802.11n devices, primarily due to the wider channel support. It should be noted that this is not a flaw in the 802.11ac amendment, it’s simply basic communications theory.

Nevertheless, there is far more to building an 802.11ac access point than simply meeting the standard. Not all 802.11ac access points perform equally without interference. But more importantly, not all 802.11ac access points perform well in the presence of interference.

Furthermore, there is far more to deploying High Density wireless LANs than only considering the performance of individual access points. Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Prepare Your Networks for High Density without Compromising on Performance

A new year means new users and new devices. More devices means more network crowding. Mobile users demand bandwidth and speed, while the network is increasingly overwhelmed by the sheer number of devices. The networks of today and tomorrow have to be ready for high client density environments.

That’s why we’ve developed the Cisco High Density Experience (HDX). I announced HDX in a blog last October with a high level look at Cisco’s answer to handling high client density environments. Each feature in the HDX solution was designed specifically to alleviate the introduction of more clients, more bandwidth hungry applications to provide an unparalleled user experience.

Starting tomorrow we’ll kick off an HDX blog series to dive deep into the four key features that come with HDX:

  1. January 8: CleanAir
  2. January 13: Turbo Performance
  3. January 27: ClientLink 3.0
  4. February 10: Optimized Roaming

For more on Cisco’s approach to 802.11ac, visit www.cisco.com/go/80211ac.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ahead of the Competition With Innovation

Current Analysis Enterprise WLAN 2013 v2013: A Year of Growth and Innovation for Cisco WLAN

As we approach the end of 2013, I feel it is important to reflect on what an important year it has been for Cisco in mobility. 2013 marked continued growth in the WLAN space overall. It’s exciting to to see the continued gain in market share. Innovation has been a key differentiation against our competitors, and we will continue to strive towards providing the best solutions for our customers’ current and future needs. I truly believe the preservation of our market growth is attributed to the cutting-edge solutions that only Cisco can offer to meet the increasingly complex challenges of mobility in the enterprise, BYOD and beyond.

Read More »

Tags: , , ,