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What Next for BYOD?

One of the interesting and challenging aspects of working in the Mobility space is the sheer pace at which the industry is moving.  I’m fortunate to work with many Customers in EMEA to help support and shape their strategy towards Mobile technology.  A great example of this has been the reaction to BYOD.

The influx of personal devices into the Enterprise caused by the BYOD trend poses numerous challenges to IT Departments.  Understandably, initial reaction was to focus on network and device level Security.

Cisco responded by introducing a BYOD Solution to remove some of the burden from IT Departments and provide them with a central point for managing many aspects of the BYOD lifecycle: onboarding, device profiling, authentication, authorization, offboarding and self-service management.

Almost at the same time, a new industry segment was created: Mobile Device Management. The intent of MDM systems is Read More »

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Securing the Future Enterprise

This blog post is part three of a three-part series discussing how organizations can address mobile security concerns through an architectural approach to mobility. The first post discusses how next-gen Wi-Fi models will pave the way for secure mobility. The second post highlights the risks versus the rewards of mobility.

Providing corporate network access via mobile devices is nothing new to today’s IT administrators. However, the future of BYOD and mobility will change as rising generations expect and demand more seamless and secure connectivity. Recently Tab Times editor Doug Drinkwater shared a similar idea: BYOD is still in an early phase with plenty of new challenges and opportunities ahead.

In this last installment of this security and mobility series, I’ll discuss why BYOD policies will change and outline how C-level executives can leverage employees as solution drivers in order to solidify the future of mobility within their organization. Read More »

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HDX Blog Series #2: Scaling with Turbo Performance

Editor’s Note: This is the second of a four-part deep dive series into High Density Experience (HDX), Cisco’s latest solution suite designed for high density environments and next-generation wireless technologies. For more on Cisco HDX, visit www.cisco.com/go/80211ac.  Read part 1 here

With any new technology comes a new set of obstacles to overcome.  802.11ac is no exception.  Last week we talked about CleanAir for 802.11ac and why spectrum intelligence still matters. Another challenge is scalability. In this post I will give you some details on new HDX feature, Turbo Performance, which allows the AP 3700 overcome common scaling issues to scale amazingly well.

What’s Different with 802.11ac?

802.11ac means higher data rates, which means more packets per second (PPS).  There are three reasons for more PPS with 11ac: wider channels, increased modulation and increased aggregation.  Channel width doubled to 80 MHz, modulation increased from 64 QAM to 256 QAM, and aggregation increased from 64k to 1MB!

With 802.11n, an AP might have had to push 30,000 1500 byte packets per second through the APs data plane. Today with 802.11ac that could now be 75,000+ PPS.  More PPS means more load on the APs CPU, so to really keep up with the demands of 802.11ac, we needed to go back to the drawing board.   Read More »

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Summary: With IoE and a Smartphone, You Can Shop Like a Superhero

Are you at #NRF14 this week? Join us in Booth 1954 and learn about our solutions to integrate next-gen technology into retail.

Superheroes and their super strengths have long captured our imaginations. Today, such daydreams – and abilities are getting just a bit closer to reality.

When your smartphone meets the Internet of Everything (IoE), it will make some common activities, such as shopping, a bit more super. Mobility has already assumed a central role in the retail experience, but how are increased contextual capabilities emerging across the entire customer journey?

This blog discusses how some retailers are connecting people to people and people to things, while tapping superpower abilities and making their brands and product experiences distinct.

With the superpowers of smartphones and IoE, retailers can insert themselves into crucial conversations with the customer by offering price matching, access to expanded inventories, suggestions, and shopping lists. All of these combine to keep shoppers engaged and moving along the journey – and beyond.

Read the full article: With IoE and a Smartphone, You Can Shop Like a Superhero

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HDX Blog Series #1: Why Spectrum Intelligence Still Matters

Editor’s Note: This is the first of a four-part deep dive series into High Density Experience (HDX), Cisco’s latest solution suite designed for high density environments and next-generation wireless technologies. For more on Cisco HDX, visit www.cisco.com/go/80211ac

CleanAir for 802.11ac:  Why Spectrum Intelligence Still Matters

In wireless networking and communications, as with life, nothing good comes for free. It’s well known that the primary feature of the new IEEE 802.11ac amendment is support for an 80 MHz-wide channel. The benefit of an 80 MHz channel is the potential to double usable throughput in comparison to that of 802.11n using a 40 MHz wide channel.

However, what is less well known is that a wider RF channel is also more susceptible to interference. In other words, 802.11ac devices “hear more” than 802.11n devices, primarily due to the wider channel support. It should be noted that this is not a flaw in the 802.11ac amendment, it’s simply basic communications theory.

Nevertheless, there is far more to building an 802.11ac access point than simply meeting the standard. Not all 802.11ac access points perform equally without interference. But more importantly, not all 802.11ac access points perform well in the presence of interference.

Furthermore, there is far more to deploying High Density wireless LANs than only considering the performance of individual access points. Read More »

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