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New Nexus 9300 Switches join the Nexus 9000 Series

It’s an exciting time in to be in our industry, especially as we witness how technology continues to reshape how we connect and communicate through a myriad of applications and devices not only within our own companies, but also with our customers and partners.

At the epicenter of this technological transformation, we continue to find that the network is what ultimately enables these applications and their users to connect. We also quickly find that if this same network is not ready to deal with the ever increasing influx of devices, new applications with varying traffic patterns, and 24  x 7 access from pretty much anywhere, it can quickly turn into an IT departments nightmare.

It is exactly to deal with these new types of requirements that the award-winning Nexus 9000 Series (made up of both the Nexus 9500 and Nexus 9300 portfolios) was introduced into the market almost 11 months ago. Now, over 600 customers have purchased this new switching family and are experiencing the positive impact that having a high performing, scalable, programmable, and resilient data center network has on application performance and overall user quality of experience in both traditional and Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) architectures.

Today we are happy to announce the addition of three new switches into the Nexus 9300 Series as well as a 6-port 40Gbps module to deliver more flexibility and form factor options to meet different architectural needs.  The new products are:

  • Cisco Nexus 9372TX: 1-rack-unit switch supporting 1.44 Tbps of bandwidth across 48 fixed 1/10-Gbps BASE-T ports and 6 fixed 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports
  • Cisco Nexus 9372PX: 1-rack-unit switch supporting 1.44 Tbps of bandwidth across 48 fixed 1/10-Gbps SFP+ ports and 6 fixed 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports
  • Cisco Nexus 9332PQ: 1-rack-unit switch supporting 2.56 Tbps of bandwidth across 32 x 40Gbps QSFP+ ports
  • 6-port 40 Gigabit Ethernet Module for the Nexus 93128TX, 9396TX , and 9396PX for connectivity options to meet your needs

These new switches deliver high performance, additional buffers, as well as support for VXLAN routing in a compact form factor. In addition to this, support for the Cisco Nexus 2000 Fabric Extenders has also been added to the Nexus 9300 portfolio. So if you already had Fabric Extenders in your data center or are looking for a scalable and operationally simplified architecture – you can now have the best of both worlds.

But it doesn’t end there – in case you missed it, Cisco recently announced the availability of the Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) making the creation of a more simplified, robust, application-centric infrastructure  a reality with the Nexus 9000 Series as the network foundation. You can read more about it here – in Craig Huitema’s blog, which outlines not only new products on the nexus 9000 series including 100Gbps on the Nexus 9500, but also how we have simplified the introduction of the Nexus 9000 and ACI into data centers through different ACI starter kits and bundles. In addition, for those of you that want to deploy the Nexus 7000 in combination with the Nexus 9300s, new bundles that bring together the Nexus 7000 and Nexus 9300 are also available.

As you can see, we continue to deliver the products and architectural options that will allow data centers of all sizes to address increasing and changing application requirements.  Between the Nexus 9300 and Nexus 9500 portfolios and their ability to be deployed into 3-tier, spine/leaf, or ACI architectures, customers can benefit from more connectivity options and a diverse set of form factors to meet varying data center needs. I invite you to learn more about the Nexus 9000 Series at www.cisco.com/go/nexus9000.

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Meet the Next Generation Fabric Extender – Cisco’s Nexus 2300 Series

More than 5 years ago, Cisco introduced its first Nexus 2000 Fabric Extender (FEX) into the market. This broad portfolio has enabled over 15,000 customers to seamlessly add network access port density across server racks without adding the inherent management complexity that comes with adding more boxes into your architecture to meet scaling requirements which ultimately translates into lower capex and opex for the business.

Today marks the next evolution for this portfolio as we introduce the Nexus 2300 platform -- the 3rd generation Fabric Extender family. Based on the extensive innovations you have come to know from the Nexus 2100 and 2200 platforms, Nexus 2300 Fabric Extenders expand on these capabilities with:

  • Larger buffers to absorb bursts of traffic for a wide variety of workloads such as multicast feeds, voice traffic, video traffic, and healthcare applications
  • Unified Ports support enabling a flexible LAN and SAN deployment through support for Ethernet, Fiber Channel and Fiber Channel over Ethernet connectivity
  • Support for Cisco’s 40G BiDi optics simplifying migration 10 to 40 Gigabit Ethernet speeds while reusing existing 10G cabling
  • Additional versatile TCAM which can be used for:
    • Advanced features such as ACL classifications and QOS
    • Hardware-capable local flow redirect for architectures that require intra-rack traffic to reduce bandwidth

Put all of these together with the single point of management, policy enforcement, zero-touch provisioning installation and automatic configuration that is available across all Nexus 2000 Fabric Extenders and you further benefit from a more simplified and flexible network design that helps you commission and decommission server racks faster, simplify operations, and support varying workload requirements.

Now let’s look at the first member of the Nexus 2300 platform, the Nexus 2348UPQ. Priced at $9500 (US List), almost the same price as current 1Gbps FEXs, the Nexus 2348UPQ supports 48 1/10 Gigabit Ethernet ports. You can add further 10 G ports when you split the 40G ports for up to 64 10G ports – perfect for data centers that are migrating their servers from 1 to 10G network connectivity. The 6 on-board 40Gbps ports support Cisco’s BiDi optics so that as you migrate from 10G to 40G as your uplink speed, you can reuse your existing 10G cabling – helping you save on the costs of re-cabling your network and get it upgraded faster! This new fabric extender can be deployed in conjunction with Nexus 5500, 5600, and 6000 parent switches and with the Nexus 7000 and 9000 Series in the future.

In summary, Cisco’s Fabric Extender portfolio has seen tremendous traction in the market as the many benefits of this architecture ultimately help create a cost-effective, flexible and simplified approach to building a data center network. The Nexus 2300 Series Fabric Extender, with the Nexus 2348UPQ, continues to deliver on these same principles and further expands on the promise of helping simplify network deployment and operations while ensuring the data center network is ready to support varying application needs. I invite you to learn more about the Nexus 2348UPQ and other Nexus 2000 Series Fabric Extenders at www.cisco.com/go/nexus2000.

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#EngineersUnplugged S4|Ep6: Closing the Management Gap!

December 4, 2013 at 1:54 pm PST

Welcome back to Engineers Unplugged. In this week’s episode, we geek out with Cisco’s Roger Barlow and VMware’s Bhumik Patel (@bhumikp). The topic--how to close the management gap, featuring UCS and vSphere. They cover a variety of use cases and offer practical how-to:

**The next shoot is last week of January at Cisco Live in Milan! If you want to be internet-famous, contact me ASAP to talk about being on the show.**

This is Engineers Unplugged, where technologists talk to each other the way they know best, with a whiteboard. The rules are simple:

  1. Episodes will publish weekly (or as close to it as we can manage)
  2. Subscribe to the podcast here: engineersunplugged.com
  3. Follow the #engineersunplugged conversation on Twitter
  4. Submit ideas for episodes or volunteer to appear by Tweeting to @CommsNinja
  5. Practice drawing unicorns

Join the behind the scenes by liking Engineers Unplugged on Facebook.

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Cisco UCS vs. IBM Flex System: Complexity and Cost Comparison

June 25, 2013 at 3:29 pm PST

Complexity and Cost Comparison: Cisco UCS vs. IBM Flex System is report recently published by Principled Technologies.

They evaluated both the technologies and costs of each solution and found a UCS solution is both less expensive to deploy and less complex to manage than an IBM Flex System.

Off all the ways Principled Technologies shows how UCS is a superior solution, I wanted to touch on just one: highly available and scalable management. A UCS management domain consists of a pair of Fabric Interconnects and supports up to 160 blade and/or rack servers. In contrast, IBM is limited to 54 blade servers plus a non-redundant Flex System Manager node. Quoting from the paper:

Because IBM Flex System Manager nodes do not failover automatically like the Cisco UCS solution, administrators must manually connect to a backup node and bring it online. Each target system has an OS agent that remains registered to the original FSM node and does not recognize the new FSM. Admins must manually unregister each of these agents from the failed node and then register the new FSM node. [page 7]

Read the full report to learn the many additional ways which UCS is shown to be superior solution and why Cisco has leapt ahead of IBM and is now the #2 blade server vendor worldwide1

Principled Technologies Complexity and Cost Comparison Cisco UCS vs. IBM Flex System from Cisco Data Center

 

Would like to learn more about how Cisco is changing the economics of the datacenter, I would encourage you to review this presentation on SlideShare  or my previous series of blog posts, Yes, Cisco UCS servers are that good.

  1. Source:  IDC Worldwide Quarterly Server Tracker, Q1 2013 Revenue Share, May 2013

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Introducing First Services Module on Nexus 7000 Series

Cloud computing is part of the journey to deliver IT as a Service which enables IT to change from a cost center to a business strategic partner. Forrester Research recently published a report that concluded, “Cloud computing is ready for the enterprise… but many enterprises aren’t ready for the cloud.”1   Yet Cloud deployments are happening – and I mean all types of Clouds – Private, Public and Hybrid. In other words, we have entered the World of Many Clouds.

Network touches everything and is a key building block for agile and scalable virtualized and Cloud-based data centers. Yesterday, I have introduced our new Nexus 6000 series and new 40 GE extensions to Nexus 5500 and 2000 Series. Today, I would like to introduce the very first services module for the Nexus 7000 Series.

  NAM

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