Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Government

Catalyst 3560 and 3750 achieve USGv6 and Ready Logo Certifications!

January 25, 2013 at 1:08 pm PST

The Global Certification Team is proud to announce that the Cisco Catalyst 3560 and 3750 have earned USGv6 and Ready Logo certifications!  Specifically, the Catalyst 3560C, 3560X, 3560E, 3560V2 and the Catalyst 3750X, 3750E, 3750V2 were certified on IOS 15.0(2)SE or later.  The details of the individual certifications can be found below:

The Cisco Catalyst 3560 v2 Series are next-generation, energy-efficient, Layer 3 Fast Ethernet switches. These new switches support Cisco EnergyWise technology, which helps companies manage power consumption of the network infrastructure and network-attached devices, thereby reducing their energy costs and their carbon footprint.  More information can be found at Cisco.com

The Cisco Catalyst 3750 v2 Series consumes less power than its predecessors and is an ideal access layer for enterprise, retail, and branch environments. It helps increase productivity and protects your network investment by providing a unified network for data, voice, and video. More information can be found at Cisco.com

Get up to the minute updates on Cisco product certifications from the official GCT twitter, @CiscoCertTeam!

Tags: , , , , , ,

Demystifying the Catalyst: Video Application Monitoring and Troubleshooting

In my previous blog, we looked at how Catalyst switches can be used to assess video application readiness in the network before rolling out a video based collaboration application. In this blog, let us take a look at available tools on the Catalyst switches to monitor and troubleshoot video problems in the network.

As we know, fundamentally, video traffic is different from data traffic.  Video traffic is more dynamic and bandwidth intensive and even small changes in delay or loss can cause visible disruptions to user experience. Routinely, IT trouble tickets are opened by users that are faced with degraded video experience.  To add to that, interactive video is real time. Any delay in troubleshooting will make IT miss the window to rectify the problem. For a firm with many locations and buildings, finding the problem can be complex and time consuming without the right tools. 

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Demystifying the Catalyst: The Basics of Application Visibility in the Network

What is Flexible NetFlow and why should you use it? In this blog post, let’s take a look at the basics of Application Visibility in the network for capacity planning and security.

In an enterprise, hundreds of applications are accessed by users from different locations within the campus and remotely from a branch or home. The application usage is usually not known beforehand and increases non-uniformly over time. This non-uniform app usage translates to non-uniform increases in traffic across the network which complicates capacity planning. Another complexity to capacity planning is that there can be sudden spikes in the traffic due to security issues such as internal security breaches, viruses, Denial of Service attacks, or network-propagated worms. IT administrators should not wait for these incidents to happen in order to tackle them. Instead, administrators must have the ability to see the usage pattern in advance for capacity planning and security incident detection and remediation.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Demystifying the Catalyst: What is StackPower and Why Should You Use It?

In this blog post, let’s take a look at the basics of power redundancy, why it’s needed, traditional methods of achieving it, and how you can do it better.

Businesses require a highly available campus network. Network switch power redundancy is a critical component of overall campus redundancy. There are two commonly used power redundancy solutions for switches -- full redundancy and partial redundancy. In full redundancy, every switch is attached to two power supplies so that if one goes down, other takes over. This scheme is also called 1:1 redundancy. In partial redundancy, there is one extra power supply for multiple switches. This is also called 1:N redundancy. However, each has its drawback…

Read More »

Tags: , , , ,