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Threat Spotlight: Cryptowall 4 – The Evolution Continues

- December 10, 2015 - 1 Comment

This post is authored by Andrea Allievi and Holger Unterbrink with contributions from Warren Mercer.

Executive Summary

Over the past year, Talos has devoted a significant amount of time to better understanding how ransomware operates, its relation to other malware, and its economic impact. This research has proven valuable for Talos and led the development of better detection methods within the products we support along with the disruption of adversarial operations. CryptoWall is one ransomware variant that has shown gradual evolution over the past year with CryptoWall 2 and Cryptowall 3. Despite global efforts to detect and disrupt the distribution of CryptoWall, adversaries have continued to innovate and evolve their craft, leading to the release of CryptoWall 4. In order to ensure we have the most effective detection possible, Talos reverse engineered CryptoWall 4 to better understand its execution, behavior, deltas from previous versions and share our research and findings with the community.  

For readers that may not be familiar, ransomware is malicious software that is designed to hold users’ files (such as photos, documents, and music) for ransom by encrypting their contents and demanding the user pay a fee to decrypt their files. Typically, users are exposed to ransomware via email phishing campaigns and exploit kits. The core functionality of CryptoWall 4 remains the same as it continues to encrypt users’ files and then presents a message demanding the user pay a ransom. However, Talos observed several new developments in CryptoWall 4 from previous versions. For example, several encryption algorithms used for holding users’ file for ransom have changed. Also, CryptoWall 4 includes a new technique to disable and delete all automatic Windows backup mechanisms, making it almost impossible to recover encrypted files without having an external backup. Finally, CryptoWall 4 has been observed using undocumented API calls not previously used to find the local language settings of the compromised host. These are just a few of the new findings Talos observed in the new iteration of CryptoWall that are detailed further in this post.

For our technically savvy users, we encourage you to continue reading. As always, we strongly encourage users and organizations to follow recommended security practices and to employ multiple layers of detection in order to reduce the risk of compromise. Our in-depth analysis of the latest CryptoWall version gives us a better opportunity to protect our users by allowing us to identify better detection methods. Finally, as a note regarding recent statements by the FBI informing users that they should just pay the ransom if they have no alternative, Talos strongly encourages users to not pay the ransom as doing so directly funds this malicious activity.

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1 Comments

    I had not yet heard about ransomware as a component of threat - this was very informative and frankly alarming to find that the FBI is suggesting that the victims should simply pay the threat actors the ransom.

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