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6 Healthcare IT Transitions: The Hackers delight

May 4, 2014 at 10:15 pm PST

From FDA (Food and Drug Administration) to FBI (Federal bureau of Investigations), they see a core issue bubbling up: The vulnerability of Healthcare systems to cyber-attacks. Both agencies have issued an advisory in this regard in the last 1 year.

Source: DataLossDB.org

Source: DataLossDB.org -- Healthcare amounts to 17% of incidents in 2013

FDA Advisory was focused on medical devices and hospital networks, while the FBI’s communication is focused on hackers attempting to hack personal medical records and health insurance data and even goes to calling out the gaps in resiliency to cyber-attacks as compared with other sectors such as financial and retail sectors.

In addition, looking at statistics from datalossdb.org, Health Care sector has consistently been in the top 3 sectors that have had the most incidents.

But the question is, why now?

This is where the correlation with the Health Care IT transition time lines adds up. It’s the other side of Health Care IT transitions that we looked at in the previous part (At the security cross roads of Healthcare reforms and IoE – 6 Health Care IT Transitions) of this blog series – the threat that have emerged from open anywhere, anytime, any device access which has enabled convenience and transformational experience to patients and care teams.

Let’s see an example of the changing dynamics of some of these transitions from a Hackers perspective by analyzing one of these transitions: Transition from Paper charts to EMR and enabling anywhere anytime, any device access to my care teams and my patients.

Health Care IT Transitions and their Security Implications 1-3 of 6

Health Care IT Transitions and their Security Implications (1-3 of 6)

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Connected Health – It’s About Being There

Years ago I was standing next to the Chief Trauma Surgeon (CTS) in an Emergency Department while the team worked feverishly to resuscitate an injured EMT.  The EMT had been struck by a speeding car while at the scene of an accident. In one split second he went from being a first responder to being a patient.  My job was to relay information to the Operating Room to make sure the Trauma Suite was prepared appropriately should this patient survive long enough to make it to surgery.  The code had been going on for almost an hour and all the efforts of a dozen brilliant and highly trained professionals seemed to have no impact.  In fact, things just seemed to be getting worse.  Finally the resident came over and asked the CTS if we should ‘call it’.  In hospital speak, that means to admit defeat and acknowledge that the patient cannot be resuscitated.  It means, literally, to call the time of death.  I watched while the weight of the decision spread over the face of the CTS and change his posture as if an actual physical weight had been put on his shoulders.   After a few minutes, he turned without a word to walk towards the waiting room to speak to the family.  He had only taken a few steps when he turned around and came back.  “No, keep going.”  The commitment and compassion I saw in his face that day has never left me.  He was there for that EMT.  The power of truly being there to make a difference hit home.

At Cisco, we are working to make it easier to “be there”.  To bring knowledge and expertise right to where it is needed, no matter where you are, no matter who you are.  We are using technology to connect not just machines and data bases, but people.  Today, we see the powerful forces of social, mobility, the cloud and information coming together.  Gartner describes this as the Nexus of Forces. This nexus is disrupting old models and creating new market transitions. Scaling these technologies is making things possible that were not possible before.  And Cisco is working to be there, to help you be there.

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“What If” Could Be Now: Truly Mobile Healthcare

March 14, 2012 at 7:26 am PST

Once upon a time in the days of Opie and Andy, doctors made house calls. I’ve seen it on TV, so it must be true. Now, a doctor visit usually requires that you do the visiting to a clinic, office, or hospital. An initial appointment may result in referrals for tests or to specialists – more visits, parking lots, waiting rooms. Sometimes your information gets transferred along, sometimes it doesn’t.

Mobile devices are showing up everywhere, healthcare included. There’s even a new word: mHealth. (We had e-everything in the early 2000s, then came along iSomething, so let’s now move further into the alphabet with mWords.) Read More »

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