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Cisco Video Surveillance Manager 7 Facilitates Plant Floor Security Management

September 11, 2012 at 2:45 pm PST

Today, about half of the video surveillance cameras sold are IP (versus analog) cameras.  Manufacturers are using video surveillance to ensure safety and security on plant floors and to reduce shrinkage in warehouse and retail locations.

Neil Peterson, the senior manager for wireless marketing at Emerson Process Management was recently quoted in a Control Engineering article, saying that “process plants identified by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security as critical to the country’s infrastructure must be secured against all threats: cyber and physical”.

In support of the growing demand for IP-based video surveillance in industries including manufacturing, Cisco recently introduced Video Surveillance Manager 7.0 with a suite of hyper-scalable connected physical security solutions.  These can help manufacturers support their video surveillance deployments and configurations in a hyper-scalable and flexible manner.

Cisco’s Guido Jouret, General Manager Emerging Technologies and CTO, discusses Video Surveillance Manager 7

Video Surveillance Manager 7.0, along with Cisco’s related end-to-end Connected Physical Security Solutions give plant and IT managers access to robust video surveillance scalability, network aware intelligence, streamlined implementation and simplified management. 

For more information, please see Cisco’s recent press release or contact your local Cisco account representative.

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Full Speed Ahead for London Olympic Games with Cisco Videoscape

By George Tupy, Marketing Manager, Cisco Service Provider Video

It’s one of the most exciting times of the year here at Cisco. Not only are we exhibiting at the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) show in Las Vegas, we are entering the home stretch for our third consecutive partnership with NBC as they prepare to present the 2012 London Olympic Games.

Once again, Cisco will be helping NBC capture 17 action-packed days of Olympic Games coverage by providing a massive, high-speed IP video network. As we did previously in Beijing and Vancouver, this broadcast-grade Cisco infrastructure will allow NBC to bring every minute of every event back to its studios in New York, and allow editors and shot selectors to work on Olympic footage as it is captured, from thousands of miles away. With the help of Cisco video technology, NBC will also bring viewers closer to the games than ever before, providing thousands of hours of live events, on-demand highlights, and behind the scenes footage to viewers’ PCs, smartphones, and tablets.

Just as exciting, the London Olympic Games will mark the first “Videoscape Olympics.” Using Cisco Videoscape technology, NBC will deliver a personalized, interactive, multi-screen Olympics experience to select users at event venues and accommodations. Users will be able to watch six live TV channels and hundreds of hours of on-demand Olympics coverage on their smartphones and tablets for the duration of the games.

The logistical and technical preparation involved in supporting a major worldwide broadcast event like the Olympics is a monumental effort, and here at Cisco, we feel like we are preparing for a marathon ourselves. It’s a credit to all of the amazing people at Cisco and NBC who are working around the clock to make it happen, and to the close working partnership our companies have developed. Just ask Craig Lau, vice president of Information Technology for NBC Olympics, who recently said, “Cisco helped us exceed our goals in Vancouver and Beijing. We look forward to London.”

Bookmark this blog for continuing coverage of our participation in the London Olympic Games. More to come!

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Hello, IP&TV World Forum! We’re in MR1, Gallery Level

It’s springtime in London (or near enough), which must mean it’s time again for the IP&TV World Forum. Here’s a handful of reasons why you should come by and see us this week!

1. Strong coffee that is free and plentiful. Enough said.

2. To check out a (deployed) way of wiring homes that aren’t wired. Last year, AT&T launched its “Free Your TV” offering in its U.S. footprint – an instantly popular product, because it lets consumers place their HDTV screens wherever they want – regardless of whether there’s a coaxial outlet nearby. If getting to signal to usual or unusual places in your house is on your wish list, come by.  We’ll fill you in on how the AT&T deployment is going (hint: really, really well).  Check out the AT&T ad here:

And while you’re in the stand, do check out our Videoscape demonstrations – Lots of cool new developments to see!. And if that’s not enough, ask us about progress to date with recent Videoscape newsmakers TELUS, Rogers, and Numericable. Read More »

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Videoscape Extends Network Intelligence into the Home to Reduce Multi-screen Costs

The SCTE Cable-Tec Expo held in Atlanta (Nov 15-17, 2011), provided further industry confirmation that multi-screen delivery has become table stakes for operators. Yet, an undercurrent of all the promise that multi-screen video can bring is the cost of delivering applications and services to additional screens. There are network costs for additional bandwidth provisioning, data center costs for transcoding content into various bit rates and formats, and customer support costs related to the launch of new services, among others. How can operators confidently launch multi-screen services under these circumstances? Cisco’s Videoscape addresses this operator concern with an architecture designed to mitigate the cost of multi-screen video delivery and to achieve tangible results.

Let’s take the use case of linear TV streaming to companion devices in the home. There is growing concern that consumers will treat their companion devices as they do their regular TVs, and continuously stream linear content to their connected devices, raising the cost to provision sufficient bandwidth to support subscribers. There are multiple ways to tackle this consumer behavior challenge. Better content discovery and recommendation can ensure that consumers only stream content they actively want to watch, and data caps can provide the disincentive to over-consumption.

Cisco’s Videoscape architecture addresses this challenge by extending cloud transcoding and network intelligence into the home. Videoscape multi-screen home gateways can alleviate some of the bandwidth concerns for streaming to Internet-connected Read More »

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Cisco Leads the way in standardizing IP Video delivery through MPEG DASH Specification

The share of time-shifted content as compared to conventional broadcast TV programming has been on a continual upward trend.  One third of U.S. consumers currently use a digital video recorder (DVR) or similar device for time-shifting.  However, as on-demand programming becomes more popular as a substitute for typical time-shifting, more consumers are visiting the Web to access their favorite shows and movies on a computer or mobile device.  Consequently, the Web is quickly becoming a popular choice for on-demand digital TV that incorporates content downloads and streaming using Web protocols.

The Streaming of MPEG Media over HTTP Ad Hoc Group (now known as the Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) Ad Hoc Group) began working on the development of a specification and published a call-for-proposals in May 2010 to address this growing market.  After an initial evaluation period in July 2010, DASH Ad Hoc Group adopted 3GPP’s Release 9 as a baseline specification and began running several evaluation experiments. The DASH Ad Hoc Group is working on the standardization of the manifest file, delivery format, conversion to and from existing file formats, and the use of MPEG2 Transport Streams as a media format. The DASH Ad Hoc Group has also been coordinating closely with the 3GPP SA4 Working Group to better align their respective specifications in this area. Read More »

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