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Ultra low latency Ethernet (UCS “usNIC”): questions and answers

July 17, 2013 at 5:00 am PST

I have previously written a few details about our upcoming ultra low latency solution for High Performance Computing (HPC).  Since my last blog post, a few of you sent me emails asking for more technical details about it.

So let’s just put it all out there.

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Join Webinar on Unifying Digital Media Content Management

With the explosion of movies and TV programs available to consumers on any device, traditionally siloed content management systems are straining to keep up. Complicating things further is auxiliary content around each title such as poster artwork, chapter thumbnails, supplementary videos. Throw in to the mix music, e-books and digital comics and the content management challenges become near impossible. Unifying the content management systems is key to solving these challenges, and Cisco Videoscape Media Suite is the unified CMS leading the way.

Learn more about digital media content management by joining our webinar this week.

Title: Unifying Digital Media Content Management – Handling the Complexity Of All Media
Date: Thursday, July 18 Read More »

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Three Imperatives for Today’s CISO for Data Center Security: Key Takeaways from Today’s Webcast

This is a follow up from my post last week that announced this webcast. Today it was a treat to have Richard Noguera as our special guest and who is uniquely qualified to speak on the topic of key imperatives for today’s CISO for the data center.  Rich is a youthful InfoSec veteran who has led teams at Yahoo, Symantec and McAfee as well as held consulting roles and presently at Accenture in a Security and Risk management strategy role. I wanted to provide you access to the slides as well as summarize some of the key points Rich educated us on today.

Three imperatives for today¹s ciso for data center fina lv rn[2] from Cisco Data Center

 

As a concept, cloud is the one that most interested our audience today. We are seeing heavily virtualized data centers with private clouds, cloud attached data centers that leverage Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) facilities for rapid service deployment or capacity management, and hybrid clouds that mix/match based on implementation needs.  Most of our customers have embraced one of the above models.  And, so I am going to focus on our imperatives accordingly.

Imperative 1: Enable IT to Play a More Strategic Role

Gartner predicts with market maturity that enterprises will increase migration of *mission-critical* functions to *public* cloud services over the next 3-5 years. IT and InfoSec must adapt and consider an alternative means to maintain the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of their business services, data, and users. For the ‘extended enterprise’ to operate effectively then, access control and data exchange between cloud service providers (CSP) needs to be standardized. Organizations should look to implement a Cloud Services Brokerage (CSB) – whether internally or externally, utilizing private/public/hybrid clouds – to accelerate service implementation and integration and also ensure visibility and cohesive security policy across multiple cloud service providers.

Imperative 2:  Business-driven Security and Risk Metrics

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Serious Simplification Advancement

Recently I spent time at Cisco Live Orlando where I caught up with Trey Layton, CTO, VCE. We had an opportunity to talk about automation and orchestration of Vblock with Cisco UCS Director (formerly Cloupia). Over recent months, we have been doing even more work for our customers, collectively between our companies, to do deeper integration and to simplify the management, administration, provisioning and automation of our converged infrastructures.

As we see the continued trend to move to a services model in IT and adopt a private cloud infrastructure, Cisco UCS Director is the only solution to provide single pane of glass automation and provisioning of all virtual and physical assets and can provide end-to-end orchestration across server, network and storage resources.  With Vblock, it provides our mutual customers an elastic pool of resources to be able to consume and adapt to various applications and use cases that customers are deploying in the virtualized or bare metal environments.

We are excited about the developments around both what UCS Director and Vblock are delivering, and there is a lot more in the works moving forward to continue to support simplification and agility for our customers’ data center architecture.

  • The next release of UCS Director will add VMAX and VNXE storage support to the product by September.  This will allow UCS Director to support all Vblock models with complete server, network and storage provisioning automation.
  • The UCS Director task library will include over 50 Vblock specific tasks to allow users to easily build model-based automation workflows to dynamically provision the system.

Cisco continues to innovate, delivering technology and solutions that provide real value to our customers. Tomorrow starts here.

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Moving to IPv6: Rebuilding the Heart of the Internet Without Missing a Beat

Within the coming decade, Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) will be key to enabling 50 billion connections among people, processes, data, and things in the Internet of Everything (IoE)But how we get there from here is not a simple matter.

I’m very pleased to invite Mark Townsley, Cisco Fellow and recognized industry expert on IP, to discuss this important transition in the second of our three-part blog series on IPv6. The first blog in Mark’s series was “Demystifying IPv6”.

townsley

Three years ago, I organized a conference in Paris where I thought it would be fascinating to bring together the original designers of IPv6 alongside the engineers who were finally deploying it at scale more than a decade later. During this discussion, Steve Deering, one of the “fathers” of IPv6 in the 1990s, was asked one of the most common questions about IPv6: Why wasn’t it designed for backward compatibility with IPv4? After all, wouldn’t it be easier to make the transition if the two versions could transparently coexist? Steve answered that the problem is not that IPv6 wasn’t designed to be backward-compatible—the real problem is that IPv4 wasn’t designed to be forward-compatible.

Steve was making the point that IPv4 was designed with a fixed address space. Given the number of computers connected to the Arpanet throughout the 1970s, this fixed-length address field seemed to be sufficient—at least for that version of IP. IP had been replaced before, and it seemed perfectly reasonable at the time that it might be replaced again. Read More »

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