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The Soundtrack of Technology

I’ve mentioned before that I grow up around a very musical family. I remember on Sunday’s sitting around on the porch with the whole family playing music. Heck anytime I go back home to Tennessee, we go and play music until early in the morning. Now I was never much of a musician at all.  Although to be quite honest, I’d stand up to the crap today for sure. “You kids git off my lawn!!!”

The one thing I noticed is that life itself has a sound track, so it makes sense to me, that technology also should have a soundtrack. So from the somewhat legal music files of Jimmy Ray Purser, here is my recommendation for tunes based on the technology.

Switches: Traveling Wilbury’s. There’s just something about the smooth melodic sounds of this group that just ties the tech together. Switches are the focal point of the network so the band has to stand the test of time and have a happy tempo for sure. Hey it’s switching, one of the coolest technologies out there. Getting in the Ether groove is easy with the Wilbury Boys.

Routers: Rush. With routing, you’re climbing the stack a little higher and getting into more complex stuff. Oh sure you still a command line commando using your weapons of Command-Tab (Alt-Tab for Bill’s crew) between sessions using alias commands to shortcut longer commands, etc. You need some heady-er tunes that you can sing a bar or two too but also just enjoy the more intellectual groove it puts you in. Hard to beat Rush for that stuff for sure! Dad gum I feel all Mozart smart and stuff listen to this without being a whanker about it.

Wireless: Any Industrial or Trance Electronica. Personally I grab Enigma most of the time but I feed Trance Soma thru the lab and soak it up. With wireless, you have to imagine most of it, then test. There are so many variables in wireless you really need to use music to expand your mind and float ya down Maxwell’s currents to Fourier’s shores.  Other bands come with lyrics and memories that divert your focus too much.  Honorable Mention and super close second: Yes.

Security:  Radiohead. Namely the OK Computer album. Oh man you have to remember you’re plugging your network into the world and challenging everyone. Radiohead gets you in the groove, smashes the record then eats it. That’s what you need as a security person. Think outside the friggen box, against the grain and break the beer bottle over your head.

Hacking:  Ramones. OK when you start to hack, you are breaking the rules and the law in most places. You can’t take prisoners and have to be more like Francois L’Olonnais. He was a French pirate that actually ate an enemy’s heart to terrify the enemy prisoners to make them show him an escape route out of certain capture. They did and he escaped to fight another day. That’s the mind set of a good hacker. Whatever it takes to get your data will be done. Honorable Mention: Sex Pistols/PiL

 Data Center: Boston. Data Center technology is truly a solution that you have to not only work with multiple vendors but every single piece has work perfect for the server to boot off the SAN. So it needs something different, ground breaking and high energy. Hard to beat Boston for that task for sure.  I mean come on man! Tom Scholz (lead guitar picker) didn’t like the sound of rock music so he invented his own!! Plus he was such a perfectionist he delayed an album over two years until the sound was just right. Oh yeah, that is a data center mindset right there!  Honorable Mention: Daft Punk. It puts you on grid baby!

Storage: Pink Floyd. Storage seems to be the most elitist of all technologies. They do EVERYTHING different on that side of the world for sure. Kinda like eating over at a friend’s house for the first time. Not that it’s a bad thing at all. Their methods and practices are tried and true. They are responsible for the data itself so the rules of zero loss tolerance are non negotiable. When I was a young boot camp storage rookie, I’d question why this or that and the result was the same; “You don’t understand yet, but you will in time if you keep at it” That was the same answer I got when I said; “WTF???” after listening to Pink Floyd’s Animals album.

VOIP:  Bjork. Yeah get it config’ed so you can turn this off and go grab a beer and chicken wings at 80’s throwback bar and jam to some hair band tunes!

And to finish it up; my personal happy song…When I’m in a great mood and everything seems to be going A+ you can just bet that the song; “Walking on Sunshine” by Katrina and Waves is on a loop in my head!

So…music tends to be a really personal thing. I think I’ve seen more fist fights over music then girls or sports teams. (I need new friends, I know…) Do you agree or disagree with my song selection? What is YOUR happy song in the sound track of your life?

Jimmy Ray Purser

Trivia File Transfer Protocol

The first record to sell one million copies was The Glen Miller Orchestra’s “Chattanooga Choo-Choo” way back in 1942

The Next Paradigm Shift: Application-Centric Infrastructure (ACI) gets ready to rumble

To know more about Application Centric Infrastructure join us for a special webcast
with John Chambers and Soni Jiandani
on November 6th at 10:30 am EST/7:30 pm PST/15:30 GMT
Register Here 

True Innovators are not easy to find. In fact, people who build next-generation innovations and succeed are certifiably rare. Repeat successes with these innovations are rarer still. Hatricks are legendary. Anything beyond is best relegated to a rarefied stratospheric atmosphere and dismissed as fiction.

Fortunately for us at Cisco, one need not look too far for such innovators. The team of Mario Mazzola, Prem Jain, Luca Cafiero and Soni Jiandani (affectionately called by some in the industry as the MPLS team) has both the reputation as well as the track-record of not just building world-class innovations, but for successfully converting them into multi-billion dollar global businesses within the Cisco fold.   So, when they talk about networking, a subject which they know a thing or two about, most people find it worth their while to listen up.

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Syrian Electronic Army Continues Spree: Cracks New York Times, Twitter and Huffington Post

The Syrian Electronic Army continues to hammer away at media organizations.  This afternoon the Syrian Electronic Army appears to have compromised the registrar Melbourne IT which hosts the domains of notable media organizations like Twitter, The New York Times, and The Huffington Post.

Syrian Electronic Army cracks Melbourne IT Registrar

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Introducing Cisco SingleConnect Technology

August 27, 2013 at 1:22 pm PST

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When customers talk about why they like UCS they often sum it up in very concise terms. “It makes things a lot easier,” is a common refrain. But if you ask a Cisco technologist what’s good about UCS you’ll get a much more lengthy reply, probably more than you wanted to hear. :) That’s because when anyone fully describes all of the innovations in the solution, “under the covers,” so to speak, which conspire to bring about UCS benefits, they quickly find themselves reciting a rather long list of complex advancements. As I spend time in our booth at VMworld this week I hear both of these accounts of UCS. The long (how it rocks) and the short (why it rocks.)  As luck would have it, some intrepid UCS product marketers have taken it upon themselves to bridge this yawning gap in the UCS lexicon.

First, remember that UCS is an outcome of starting with a clean sheet of paper and designing a system to rectify all the random acts of system architecture that had come before it. It’s also an outcome of a completely revolutionary way of approaching computing: not from the perspective of the constituent technologies but from the perspective of fusing them all together. UCS was expressly designed to eliminate the DIY integration that customers have been faced with for years. It was designed for a world of virtualization, automation and cloud. Fundamentally, UCS was designed to connect all the dots.

With the connections in mind, we’re introducing a technology ingredient brand into the UCS lexicon: Cisco SingleConnect Technology.

SingleConnect is a term intended to encapsulate the aggregated benefits of several key UCS technology components as they relate to server connectivity: Cisco Fabric Interconnects, Fabric Extenders, Virtual Interface Cards and Virtual Machine Fabric Extender Technology (VM-FEX.) Related technologies like the Nexus 1000v suite and Cisco’s virtualized network services also come into view when we talk about connecting physical and virtual servers in the data center.

Each of these deeply sophisticated products plays a specific role, but taken altogether they create an elegant result: a simplified, uniform and extremely powerful connectivity model for servers and virtual machines. SingleConnect is way for us to describe how all of these together result in one connection for:

• LAN, SAN, and systems management

• Rack servers and blade servers

• Physical servers and virtual machines

SingleConnect, very simply, is the easiest, most intelligent and efficient way to connect and manage computing in the data center.

SingleConnect is Easy: UCS is a “wire once and walk away” solution that eliminates many of the traditional time-consuming, manual and error-prone tasks required to connect servers and virtual machines in the data center. UCS with SingleConnect is self-integrating, with automated and dynamic configuration of server I/O and networking components over a common connection. UCS centralizes administration, eliminating dozens of switching and server management points found in traditional environments while radically reducing cable management complexity.

SingleConnect is Efficient: SingleConnect Technology combines three network layers into one: top of rack, blade chassis and hypervisor switching. It also combines LAN, SAN and server systems management networks on a single fabric. Modular fabric extenders deliver capacity from a centralized fabric interconnect (single point of management) to as many as 160 servers, replacing all the Ethernet and FibreChannel switches typically deployed in much smaller server increments. Server I/O adapters (NICs, and HBA’s) are consolidated onto a single Virtual Interface Card, eliminating cost and simplifying administration.

SingleConnect is Intelligent: SingleConnect technology creates a virtualization-aware system, providing seamless VM mobility and advanced security capabilities for multi-tenant environments. I/O capacity is dynamically allocated across physical and virtual machines in the system in accordance with QOS policies, eliminating the need for manual administrator intervention and simplifying troubleshooting. Deterministic, low latency switching delivers industry leading bare metal and virtualized performance for traditional multi-tier application environments and cloud workloads alike.

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Cisco SingleConnect Technology is not a specific product or feature, it is a way to describe how a deliberate roadmap of innovation solves against one of the oldest computing problems in the data center: “how do I connect all this stuff together?”

With SingleConnect!

If you’re at VMworld in San Francisco this week, stop by the Cisco booth and we can give you demo of how SingleConnect brings it all together.

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[Summary] How Secure Is Your Mobile Worker?

August 27, 2013 at 12:07 pm PST

Let’s start with how well do you know your mobile worker?  Understanding the mobile worker’s perceptions and behaviors will offer a better view on the potential security implications your organization must manage.  Cisco just released new global research (white paper) , Cisco Connected  World International Mobile Security study, that explores the mobile worker’s view points on working remotely, connecting to corporate and their sense of security.  Some of the findings are worth reflecting on to help you set the course for your mobile security efforts.

There is no question; the movement for mobile personal devices in the workforce has been well recognized.  A recent response to this trend includes employers (almost half) offering to fund workers buying their own devices.  Allowing “chose your own” device will attract and retain talent and reduce costs (see recent IBSG BYOD research)—but what are the security implications?

There were a couple striking data points to call out:

  • 63% download sensitive data on their device …and the frequency significantly increases in some countries—
  • Most believe remote access is a privilege—yet in some countries they believe it’s a right as a worker—
  • Most are diligent when a pop up appears and read through the details on what it really means. Yet, some workers from select countries tend to be generally less careful.
  • 60% admit to engaging in risky behavior on a device  (personal or company-owned), connected to corporate resources,

So, who really owns the mobile security issue—mobile workers do not take full responsibility for a safe device--as expressed in their high confidence in their IT with over 84% believing that IT will protect them from threats no matter what device.  Read more on http://blogs.cisco.com/security/how-secure-is-your-mobile-worker-2/

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