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Cloud Unfiltered, Episode 57: Navigating the Waves of Innovation, with Lew Tucker


October 9, 2018 - 0 Comments

Do you know who Lew Tucker is?

Of course you do.

He’s the VP and CTO of Cloud Computing at Cisco, but that’s probably not why you know him. You know him because he’s on stage at a whole lot of open source conferences, explaining how technologies work, why they’re valuable, and where they’re most likely headed in the future. Sure, he mentions what Cisco is up to sometimes, but if you didn’t know that he worked for Cisco, you might not figure it out immediately. He doesn’t beat you over the head with either our product portfolio or the exhausting marketing vocabulary that is often used to sell it. No, Lew truly focuses on what each new technology or product brings to the table—regardless of who is behind it.

And now Lew is bringing his vast technical understanding and industry insight to the Cloud Unfiltered podcast. In this week’s episode, the OpenStack Foundation Vice Chair and CNCF board member very graciously chats with us about a number of things, including:

*How a research scientist studying neurobiology at Cornell winds up with a PhD in Computer Science and becomes a pillar of the open source community

*What he thinks the most interesting thing going on in cloud is right now

*How the way we build applications is changing

*What Istio does and why it’s valuable

*Which programming languages are most relevant right now and for the future

*The single most valuable tip he’d pass along to IT leaders dealing with constant innovation

*The mistake he sees IT leaders making most often

Just click on the episode below if you’d like to watch it right now. If you’re the slap-on-some-headphones-and-listen-while-you-do-administrative-work type though, fear not—it’s available on iTunes and SoundCloud too!

And if you’d like to check out past episodes of this podcast (we’ve got more than 50 of them!), just pop on over to the archive. I suspect you’ll find one in there that speaks to you.



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