Cisco Blogs
Share

Inside Meraki and Cloud Networking


November 3, 2014 - 0 Comments
Robb Boyd and Jimmy Ray Purser decide where to dig around inside Meraki

Robb Boyd and Jimmy Ray Purser decide where to dig around inside Meraki

“If it seems to good to be true…”

In this statement lies the central problem to a couple of guys with a career in networking: Meraki does some beautifully complex things…but in a deceivingly simple wrapper.

Meraki originally came on the scene with a new approach to cloud based wireless “as a service” that succeeded on a great many fronts. This success brought not just an acquisition, but subsequent forays into switching, routing and security. These are your core technologies – anyone in business is depending on these in some fashion..and the Meraki Cloud Model is now offering network sophistication in a greatly simplified package.

There is beauty in the simplicity. There is also a model for how and why the cloud matters. Yes there is hardware for every bit of the solution being offered but the true ‘service’ is delivered quite elegantly through the cloud. It enables a great many things in a manner that can make you wonder what you may be missing.

So this is what we do. We go to San Francisco, where it all began…and where these engineers continue to innovate. We peer through the clouds and show you what is going on so you can decide if it is right for you.

Watch the show RIGHT NOW

Couple of questions we sought in general:

  • Where are the edges for Cisco’s On Premise technologies that offer many of the same features as Meraki?
  • Can you put your trust in something you cannot see?
  • Can you still do some of the more complex things your network demands?
  • Where do they go from here?

One of the bigger challenges right now within Cisco is how to position this technology. It is very complimentary to our core networking line but they remain a distinctly unique choice to make.

See our extended shownotes for more details, or just watch the show!

Preview:



In an effort to keep conversations fresh, Cisco Blogs closes comments after 60 days. Please visit the Cisco Blogs hub page for the latest content.