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Internet of Everything

An embeddable tooth implant sends patient information to a dentist in real-time.

A smartwatch responds to touch to help ease the loneliness of long distance relationships.

A bracelet records daily physical activity and caloric intake and provides recommendations to achieve health goals.

These capabilities may have seemed like a dream only a decade ago but now are a reality, thanks to the Internet of Everything (IoE)

Aside from the obvious coolness factor of the growing list of connected things, many of these wearable and mobile-enabled devices are helping save lives. In honor of Valentine’s Day and American Hearth Month, it’s a good time to ask: How is the Internet of Everything “hearting” our health?

IoE - Heart

The Power of Four Enables Life-Saving Intelligence

At Cisco, we refer to the Internet of Everything as the increased connections among four key components: people, things, data and process. The true power of IoE is best seen when all four of these components work together to change how we enable intelligent processes.

This is especially true for the healthcare industry. It’s not enough for your smartwatch to be able to connect to the Internet or for your connected shirt to record your movement behavior. It’s what we do with that information that makes the connection so valuable.

In a recent CNBC article, Frans Van Houten, CEO at Royal Philips Electronics, discussed the rise of the hospital to home healthcare movement. The idea is our increasingly mobile world is enabling real-time vital signs, family history and diagnostic information to be shared with your doctor, allowing for faster and earlier detection with a more personalized treatment plan. For good reason, there is much development and investment in this emerging area of healthcare.

Here’s a closer look at how more networked connections are able to collect high-velocity data and turn it into knowledge that can be delivered to patients and professionals to prevent disease, eliminate wasted efforts and better manage health crises. In other words, here’s the IoE in action:

This is just the beginning of how the Internet of Everything can help us live longer lives with those we love. As the wearable technology continues to promote more patient involvement and evolves in analytic capability, what it means to receive a diagnosis or take proactive approaches to our health will fundamentally shift.

It’s clear that when we talk about the value of networked connections, there is nothing more valuable than a long and happy life. Tell us what you think – join the conversation with #IoE.

Attending HIMSS14? Don’t miss the 7th Annual Cisco Connected Health Summit focused on health innovation and best practices. Simply call HIMSS at 800-465-1272 and ask for the Cisco event (code CCCINV) to be added to your registration.

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1 Comments.


  1. Kaiser Permanente is already a big proponent of home health care as it cuts costs while making for a better patient experience. For instance, I can transmit all of my pacemaker’s information from a secure connection at home. A technician reviews the transmission, and immediately lets my cardiologist know the results via email. In less than 24 hours, I get an email from my medical team telling me everything is great, or if there are any issues. They’re also piloting a system for those who need to monitor their blood levels so they can do this at home and submit the results directly to the lab.

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