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Summary: One Second in Baseball Brought to You By The Cloud

The world of sports is being transformed by the acceleration of big data, cloud and Internet of Everything technologies. One sport where this transformation is evident is in Major League Baseball.

MLB fans are voracious consumers of baseball data, making it important for MLB to be alive and available 24/7, 365 days a year – not just on opening day.

As discussed in Rick Smolan’s The Human Face of Big Data, the amount of data being captured during one moment of a game today is greater than that from the entire season only a few years ago.

While the game has continued to evolve on the field thanks to the work of MLB Advanced Media (MLBAM) and technologies such as PITCH/fx, it has rapidly been changing off the field as well. For example, Cisco Connected Sports solutions are transforming the fan experience, whether they are watching the game live from the stands or on their mobile devices.

As the Internet of Everything (IoE) continues to connect more people, process, data, and things, the future of baseball is sure to generate more networked connections to reveal valuable insights. Imagine what the world of sports will be like when connected baseballs can report back whether a ball was fair or out!

By adding network intelligence, convergence, orchestration, and analytics with a secure connection between devices – and connected athletes – the Internet of Everything promises to deliver powerful insights about athlete performance. An essential part of delivering these insights is through the cloud.

For a closer look at how big data, cloud and the Internet of Everything will enhance America’s favorite game, read the full blog: One Second in Baseball Brought to You By the Cloud.     

One Second in Baseball Brought to You By The Cloud

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One Second in Baseball Brought To You By The Cloud

Major League Baseball fans are voracious consumers of baseball data. It’s important for MLB to be live and available 24/7, 365 days a year – not just on opening day.

And because fans have been obsessed with statistics for as long as the sport has existed, it’s no surprise that the intersection of Big Data, mobility and cloud has begun to transform every aspect of the sport.

As discussed in Rick Smolan’s The Human Face of Big Data, the amount of data being captured during one moment of a game today is greater than that from the entire season only a few years ago.

Thanks to the work of MLB Advanced Media (MLBAM) and technologies such as PITCH/fx, gigabytes of data that capture each moment of every game in stadiums around the country are being shared with broadcasters, stadium operators and viewers at home, all in real-time through the cloud. While the game has continued to evolve on the field, it has rapidly been changing off the field. Ballparks around the country have been installing Cisco Connected Sports solutions , which impact everything from safety and security to live video on mobile devices. Beyond baseball, Cisco has been transforming the fan experience in more than 200 venues in more than 30 countries.

One Second in Baseball Brought To You By The Cloud

As the Internet of Everything (IoE) connects more people, process, data, and things, the future of baseball is sure to generate more networked connections to reveal valuable insights. The possibilities for connections are limitless:  connected fields, baseballs, bats, player uniforms, and more will not only generate more data but also provide more possibilities for analysis. Imagine what the world of sports will be like when connected baseballs can report back whether a ball was fair or foul!

Here’s a closer look at how Big Data, cloud and the Internet of Everything will enhance America’s favorite game.

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NAB 2011: On Making One Linear Channel into 20+ Video Streams

Just a few years ago, the big topic at the annual National Association of Broadcasters event was the digital transition. In that same time frame, we used to refer to “two screen” and “three screen” environments, to describe the shift of video programming to PCs and smaller screens.

All of that seems quaint now, in hindsight. The digital transition happened, without a lot of fanfare, in July of 2009; now, the number of screens capable of displaying television and video streams is into the double and triple digits.

Indeed, today’s all-digital marketplace is placing new challenges on the shoulders of the nation’s broadcasters.


John Bishop, Sr. VP of Business Development & Strategy for Inlet Technologies, now a part of Cisco, talks about Inlet’s multi-screen delivery and monetization and how these will add to Cisco’s offering.

For starters, today’s broadcast and cable networks are being asked to deliver one linear channel in as many as 30 different versions, because of the plethora of adaptive streaming methods in market. One linear stream might need to be encoded in to eight versions for Apple’s HTTP Live Streaming (HLS), six to eight for Adobe Flash, and so on for Microsoft Silverlight and other emerging platforms.

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