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Math, Science (and Broadband): U.S. Falling Behind


September 19, 2006 - 0 Comments

SAN JOSE, CA – I encourage you to read an editorial in today’s New York Times that states, in part: “The countries that outperform the United States in math and science education have some things in common. They set national priorities for what public school children should learn and when. They also spend a lot of energy ensuring that every school has a high-quality curriculum that is harnessed to clearly articulated national goals. This country, by contrast, has a wildly uneven system of standards and tests that varies from place to place.” Read the full editorial here. (Free registration required).This same editorial, methinks, could have been written replacing “math and science education” with “broadband penetration.” This is how it would read: “The countries that outperform the United States in broadband penetration have some things in common. They set national priorities for what broadband is. They also spend a lot of energy ensuring that every state has a high-quality broadband infrastructure that is harnessed to clearly articulated national goals. This country, by contrast, has a wildly uneven system of standards and speeds that varies from place to place.”Hey, I love this country, but, at some point, we should get tired at other countries looking at us in the rear-view mirror on education and broadband.



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