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Cisco and Partners add Business Value for Continental Tire

September 1, 2011 at 10:53 am PST

There’s been a lot of buzz on the Internet about the way Continental Tire of the Americas has vastly improved its manufacturing process. They adopted an innovative solution based on a Cisco architectural networking approach provided by Cisco Partner Applied Group combined with AeroScout’s asset tracking solution and a inventory management system from Global Data Sciences enabling their manufacturing facility achieve a 20 percent reduction in component tire losses. Now that’s significant!

 

Chet Namboodri interviews Peter Granger about the benefits Continental Tire is achieving from the Cisco Unified Wireless based manufacturing/wip solution

It was a real pleasure for me to take part in  the Customer case study event organized by Cisco, AeroScout and Global Data Sciences for me to speak about the Cisco contribution. The video gives a short summary as Chet Namboodri, Cisco Industry Blogger-in-Chief and Global Managing Director of Cisco’s Manufacturing Industry Marketing interviews me about what was said, and the benefits Continental expects.

That event is where I met up with folks from Continental, AeroScout and Global Sciences  to hear from the customer first hand how the solution  is increasing production and efficiency in its North America manufacturing plant. That plant is located in Mount Vernon, Illinois, and it produces more than 1,000 different tire SKU’s in its 60-acre (2.6 million square-foot) facility.

The implemented solution leverages Continental Tire’s Cisco Unified Wireless Network to add a Real-Time Location System (RTLS) and automated Work-in-Process (WIP) tracking without having to install a proprietary network of readers and sensors. That’s key. Cisco provides standards-based solutions that work well with a customers backhaul, which, for most customers is also Cisco. Cisco’s Architectural approach means networking elements and processes work well together with ‘compatibility’ tested solutions such as those from AeroScout.

But now back to the customer… Read More »

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What Technology do College Students Really Want?

September 1, 2011 at 10:29 am PST

 Our PR intern, Rachel Caudillo talks to college students here in Southern California to hear what technology they want most for going back to school with!  Check it out: 

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Are your Wireless Medical Devices up to the Coexistence challenge?

An interesting article titled “Wireless Medical Device Coexistence” (found here) was passed my way recently.  The article made a case that by creating a formalized testing strategy the risks associated with the coexistence of wireless technologies could be reduced resulting in a safe and effective wireless medical device. After reading it – I began to consider the problems we all face with wireless device coexistence and began to ask myself if such testing would improve the coexistence challenge.

Many medical devices today include wireless interfaces that utilize 802.11, Bluetooth or even ZigBee all within the ISM (Industrial, Scientific and Medical) band.  The criticality of such connectivity varies widely across the various medical device types that exist.  The most critical of these devices require continuous wireless connectivity with a “zero or near zero” packet loss factor.

The paper points out that the IEC-60601-1-2 is the standard used for EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) testing of medical devices, but the standard does not include testing recommendations to determine the conditions necessary to maintain a wireless connection when subject to interference.  Now some of you Biomedical and Clinical Engineers might point to the ISO-14971:2007 standard, but this is focused on identifying the risks during the product lifecycle and does not specifically address the RF aspects.

So I wonder, if the industry created a testing standard for medical device coexistence (in the ISM band), would this advance our cause and allow more of us to get a better night sleep?  The article provides some examples of a suggested testing strategy (you can read it here), and I won’t debate the finer points but have to ask if this would result in a safer and more effective medical device. Read More »

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Can You Destroy It?

August 26, 2011 at 1:25 pm PST

What’s the best way to demonstrate the physical durability of a new router? How about a spec sheet detailing stress test results? Not at Cisco; video of the router being used as a basketball and dog food plate gets the point across much more clearly. I was pleasantly shocked when I saw the abuses endured by Cisco’s new ISR 819 Router. It survived not only immersion in hot coffee but also a baking in a toaster oven.

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5 Configuration Changes to Fortify Your WLAN Security

You can protect your small business wireless network from intruders with a few simple tweaks

A wireless network makes sense for small businesses.  It enables you to connect wired and wireless devices, allowing you to expand your network operations and keep employees productive.  Also, a wireless LAN (WLAN) is easier and less expensive to set up than a wired network, and gives employees and guest users quick, convenient access to the Internet from anywhere in your office.

Deploying a wireless network is easy in part because the networking equipment, including wireless routers and wireless access points, ships with important configuration settings preconfigured. However, these preset passwords, along with other improperly set configurations, can lead to catastrophic breaches in network security. To ensure your wireless network is secure, the devices must be configured to block intruders and protect users.

Here are five changes you can make to your WLAN configuration settings to lock down your wireless network and provide business-class security:

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