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Filtering Explicit Content

Many web sites provide a setting to reduce the amount of explicit, or objectionable, content returned by the site. The user configures these settings, but many users are unaware such a setting exists, or that it needs to be set for each web site. Additionally, the security administrator cannot audit that users have configured the setting. As a result, users can be exposed to objectionable content or can inadvertently trigger filtering of objectionable content on the Cisco security service (Cisco WSA or CWS), sometimes causing uncomfortable questions from human resources or from management.

An emerging standard defines a new HTTP header, “Prefer: Safe,” which does not require the user to configure each web site. This feature is implemented by Firefox, Internet Explorer 10, and Bing. We anticipate more clients and more content providers will support this emerging standard.

Both Cisco Web Security Appliance (WSA) and Cloud Web Security (CWS) support this emerging standard, and can be configured to insert this header on behalf of HTTP and HTTPS clients. In this way, the security administrator can cause all traffic to default to avoiding explicit or objectionable content, without relying on users to configure their browser or to configure each visited web site.

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A New Look for Corporate Social Responsibility at Cisco

For years I suppose I was just like you, pretty cynical about the whole concept of “Corporate” social responsibility. Can an organization be truly socially responsible given the bottom line is selling product? Five years ago I left an industry I loved, education technology, and entered into the amorphous world of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Thanks to my tutor Teri Treille, who is a queen among luddites when it comes to articulating the intricacies of capturing, and tracking, a corporation’s commitment to society, my level of understanding for the movement of sustainability and socially responsible corporate actions has grown deep.

What I discovered about my company is that giving back to global communities to ensure they thrive is as integrated into our culture as is building networks. Over the years Cisco leaders such as Tae Yoo, Randy Pond, Kathy Mulvany and others have refined a strategy that is unique among our peers. By tying technology, partnerships, and expertise together they have built a strong network that is flexible and allows all employees to integrate CSR into their strategic plans.

There is no doubt that managed well, CSR can create great social and environmental value, support a company’s business objectives while reducing operating costs, and enhance relationships with key stakeholders and customers. But it is no easy task for executives to reconcile various CSR programs, quantify their benefits, and articulate the connection to the business goals while securing the support of his or her business line counterparts. When you see it happen it sometimes seems spontaneous. Digging deeper though you begin to understand that CSR is more than the framework by which to measure success: It is always about the people in the organization who care about taking initiatives to improve our world.

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