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The Internet of Everything Hearts Your Health

An embeddable tooth implant sends patient information to a dentist in real-time.

A smartwatch responds to touch to help ease the loneliness of long distance relationships.

A bracelet records daily physical activity and caloric intake and provides recommendations to achieve health goals.

These capabilities may have seemed like a dream only a decade ago but now are a reality, thanks to the Internet of Everything (IoE)

Aside from the obvious coolness factor of the growing list of connected things, many of these wearable and mobile-enabled devices are helping save lives. In honor of Valentine’s Day and American Hearth Month, it’s a good time to ask: How is the Internet of Everything “hearting” our health?

IoE - Heart

The Power of Four Enables Life-Saving Intelligence

At Cisco, we refer to the Internet of Everything as the increased connections among four key components: people, things, data and process. The true power of IoE is best seen when all four of these components work together to change how we enable intelligent processes.

This is especially true for the healthcare industry. It’s not enough for your smartwatch to be able to connect to the Internet or for your connected shirt to record your movement behavior. It’s what we do with that information that makes the connection so valuable.

In a recent CNBC article, Frans Van Houten, CEO at Royal Philips Electronics, discussed the rise of the hospital to home healthcare movement. The idea is our increasingly mobile world is enabling real-time vital signs, family history and diagnostic information to be shared with your doctor, allowing for faster and earlier detection with a more personalized treatment plan. For good reason, there is much development and investment in this emerging area of healthcare.

Here’s a closer look at how more networked connections are able to collect high-velocity data and turn it into knowledge that can be delivered to patients and professionals to prevent disease, eliminate wasted efforts and better manage health crises. In other words, here’s the IoE in action:

  • Improve caregiver efficiency at the hospital: Patient wait times and errors can be reduced when caregivers leverage the power of the Internet of Everything to coordinate resources, track completion of tasks and enable better communication between doctors, staff and patients. For example, using a combination of Wi-Fi and GPS-based location services, coordinators can keep track of where caregivers, medical equipment and other equipment such as wheelchairs are located, allowing for faster mobilization and managed workloads.
  • Monitor patients at home: Imagine that a surgical patient is outfitted with a wearable monitoring devices he can wear at home, allowing for a more peaceful recovery while doctors watch for any irregularities.
  • Share data with emergency personnel: It’s possible that in the future wireless mesh, 4G or other such networked connections between an ambulance, a cloud, a hospital and various data centers, could enable sharing a common view of vital patient information, increasing the likelihood of a positive outcome.

This is just the beginning of how the Internet of Everything can help us live longer lives with those we love. As the wearable technology continues to promote more patient involvement and evolves in analytic capability, what it means to receive a diagnosis or take proactive approaches to our health will fundamentally shift.

It’s clear that when we talk about the value of networked connections, there is nothing more valuable than a long and happy life. Tell us what you think – join the conversation with #IoE.

Attending HIMSS14? Don’t miss the 7th Annual Cisco Connected Health Summit focused on health innovation and best practices. Simply call HIMSS at 800-465-1272 and ask for the Cisco event (code CCCINV) to be added to your registration.

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At CES, Glitzy Wearables, Snazzy Smart Cars, and, Yes, Trash Cans

Walking the miles of aisles at the 2014 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, it’s easy to see how the Internet of Everything (IoE) is revolutionizing our lives. Super-smart homes, cars, drones, and all manner of entertainment are on display seemingly everywhere, along with a mind-boggling array of wearable, connected technologies.

But CES — and IoE — are not just about how we interact with cool gadgets. They are also about new ways to connect with the public-sector environment. And there are extremely exciting possibilities coming to life in our towns, cities, and communities.

Ultimately, these public-sector breakthroughs could have a profound impact. Just think about how much of your quality of life is affected on a daily basis — directly or indirectly — by parking, waste management, crime, public utilities, and government services.

Cisco predicts that $4.6 trillion of value will be “at stake” in the public sector over the next decade ($19 trillion for the public and private sectors combined), driven by “connecting the unconnected” through the Internet of Everything. We also estimate that 99.4 percent of physical objects that may one day be part
of the Internet of Everything are still unconnected.IoE - Joseph Bradley blog image - 01 15 14

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Last Year’s Tech Trends and What They Mean for 2014

2013 was an incredible year, filled with both good times and bad times.  It also proved to be a year for technology to become even more intertwined with our lives. As we move forward into the first month of the New Year, let us take a look at some of the top trends of 2013, and how they might fare this year: Read More »

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Summary: Transforming Child Safety through Mobility

New innovations in mobility are transforming our daily lives and the safety of our loved ones. As the growth of mobility enables more wearable devices and applications that include GPS and Wi-Fi features, it is becoming increasingly easier for parents to remotely monitor their children’s safety while managing their own daily tasks.

Gartner predicts that wearable electronics will be a $10 billion industry. A network is equipped to appropriately scale devices on the network will be essential as the number and types of connected devices increase in an Internet of Everything world. Enterprise networks and service providers must work together to best manage bandwidth and costs associated with network speed.

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Summary: Transforming Child Safety through Mobility

New innovations in mobility are transforming our daily lives and the safety of our loved ones. As the growth of mobility enables more wearable devices and applications that include GPS and Wi-Fi features, it is becoming increasingly easier for parents to remotely monitor their children’s safety while managing their own daily tasks.

Gartner predicts that wearable electronics will be a $10 billion industry. This opens up many opportunities for organizations that can successfully respond to the rapidly changing mobile landscape by bridging enterprise and service provider networks through an architectural approach to mobility.

How will this increase in mobile data impact your infrastructure and security? Two common concerns that must be addressed are the issue of bandwidth and the potential for malware attacks. It is important that IT leaders consider how a stable and secure network can significantly impact the future of mobility.

Read the full Transforming Child Safety through Mobility blog to learn more.

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