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Webcast Recap: Seven Myths of the “Good Enough” Network and Other Urban Legends

April 28, 2011 at 11:31 am PST

We’ve all heard some pretty outrageous myths and urban legends. You know, your mom probably warned you that if you swallow chewing gum, it will remain undigested in your gut for seven years.

Or did you hear that penguins will fall on their backs trying to see airplanes flying overhead?

And, finally, you may have heard that a “good enough” network will work just fine for video, voice, and mission-critical applications.

The truth is, none of these myths is true.

And there was some major mythbusting going on yesterday during the “Debunking the Myth of the Good Enough Network” webcast.

Bob Cagnazzi, CEO of BlueWater Communications Group (Cisco Master Partner); Rob Lloyd, Cisco’s EVP of Worldwide Operations; and Mike Rau, Cisco’s VP and CTO of Borderless Networks helped to debunk the seven most misleading myths of the “good enough” network. They talked about the dreaded Single Purpose Myth, the horrific Security as a Bolt On Myth, and the scary Application and Endpoint Ignorant Myth, just to name a few.

After he debunked those myths, Mike then provided key questions for our partners to ask their customers to find out if their network is ready.

Ready for what? Read More »

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Can You Rely on a “Good-Enough” Network?

April 27, 2011 at 11:37 am PST

Yesterday, I blogged about the “good-enough” network. You know, it’s a network that just good enough to send out a quick email or watch a video, but not quite fast or reliable enough to do everything you need.

It may be easier to think of the good-enough network in terms of other areas of your life where good enough just doesn’t cut it.

For instance, a 19-inch tube TV is certainly good enough for watching reruns of “Magnum P.I.,” but not for watching the big game.

Or using SPF 5 sunscreen may be good enough, but SPF 30 is a way better option if you want to avoid a sunburn.

Just imagine if your customers settled for a good-enough network? It may go something like this:

What are the seven myths about the good-enough network? Read More »

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Parting Clouds and Being Real About Virtualization

April 27, 2011 at 10:00 am PST

Unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years – and perhaps even then – you have undoubtedly heard someone touting the merits of virtualization and cloud computing.  Chief among the advantages are reduced costs and the capability to do more with fewer resources.

Although the terms are often used simultaneously, cloud and virtualization aren’t the same.  Click below for a brief discussion of each.

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Mobile, Video, Cloud – Can A “Good-Enough” Network Handle It All?

April 26, 2011 at 10:35 am PST

There are times in our lives when good enough works just fine.

For example, a 1968 Volkswagen Beetle is good enough to get you from point A to B, but not for driving on the Autobahn. (I don’t know about you, but I’d rather have a Porche 911.)

And a 19-inch tube TV is certainly good enough for watching reruns of “Magnum P.I.,” but not for watching the big game. (I’d go for a 50-inch LED HD flatscreen TV, thank you very much.)

The same goes for the network. Good enough is fine for the network if all you need to do is send a few emails or watch an occasional video.

But a good-enough network isn’t good enough for…

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Virtual Storage Has Real Benefits for Small Businesses

Improve hardware use and manageability as well as reduce costs with storage virtualization.

Virtualization was initially developed for large companies to make their infrastructure, particularly servers and storage, operate more efficiently and to cut spending costs on new hardware. Like many technologies, server and storage virtualization products are now being developed for small businesses to bring the same benefits to their networks.

Many smaller companies start by creating a virtualized server environment. Using hypervisor software, you can divide a single server into multiple virtual servers, each one running its own operating system and associated workload. This lets one server run many more different applications than the one operating system, one workload model of an un-virtualized server.

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