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Four Reasons to Use WebEx in 2012

You’ve heard about them, maybe you’ve even tried them: online meetings, video conferences, WebEx.

It’s a different (and we think better) way to have a meeting. You have to talk; it’s an important part of business. But you aren’t limited to just the telephone. Try a free online meeting with WebEx and see if it doesn’t make doing business easier, faster and a bit more fun.

Here’s why:

1. WebEx Mobile
It’s free! You can download the app and join someone else’s meeting with just a click. If you get the free trial or your own account, you can host meetings too. Meet on your mobile and you can get work done from anywhere.

2. WebEx Recordings
Sure you can record a teleconference, but there still aren’t any pictures. Record your WebEx and capture the screen sharing so you can see what you were talking about. You don’t have to get lost taking notes during the meeting, you can listen and participate and go back to the recording to capture the ideas. Or give the recording to team members who couldn’t make it and they can see and hear what they missed.

3. WebEx Channels
There’s a wealth of professional – and interesting – information at WebEx Channels: our content publishing arm of WebEx where you can publish your public WebEx information too! See Guy Kawasaki talk about social media strategy or Brian Dickenson at Mt Everest. Send us your product demos or compelling sales presos and use the WebEx Network as another part of our marketing strategy.

4. The New Cisco WebEx - coming this spring! Read More »

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Four Ways Social Software Collaboration Technology Can Change Higher Education

New media and collaboration technologies have the potential to transform higher education in terms of the classroom, the learning process, the relationship between students and instructors, and how institutions conduct academic research. While much of the industry discussion revolves around use of consumer tools and social network sites like Facebook and Twitter and LinkedIn, Cisco’s educational customers also see tremendous opportunity to increase student engagement and drive their own institutional strategies with “enterprise class” social software as well.

Since Cisco first announced Quad, we have had conversations with dozens of colleges and universities regarding the role enterprise social software and Cisco Quad can play in transforming education. Cisco Quad is an enterprise collaboration platform that brings people together to share ideas and content, collaborate on projects, and interact using chat, voice or video, regardless of where people are located.

Below, we’ve outlined four ways in which educational institutions are telling us enterprise social software is helping, or can transform the way learning, research, and academic advisement is crafted, delivered and consumed:

1. The 24/7 interactive classroom: Instructors often struggle to deliver a collaborative environment for their students that is secure and supports multiple access methods such as mobile.  Technology like Quad can enable students to interact in a secure, policy-based manner that extends the classroom conversation beyond physical walls. Courses partially or wholly targeted at off-campus students can similarly benefit from enhancing the class-like experience for remote students. For example, at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, the cross country MBA students based in the US, England, India and other countries are using Quad to create virtual working groups, find people with common interests, share files or videos with other students working on similar projects and instantly start video conferences or chat sessions. Quad provides students with the ability to interact, ask questions and share ideas with professors/faculty/tutorial assistants anytime, as opposed to only during fixed faculty office hours. It can also drive improved accountability on team projects, as content and comments are tracked in activity feeds and in project communities by both participating students and faculty leads.

2. Serendipitous Research: Quad contains several features, such as an activity feed that compiles microblog posts from students and staff and allows a snapshot view of a person’s current activities. These dynamic updating functionalities can facilitate broader cross-departmental collaboration, for students and researchers alike. Security features ensure that research that needs to be confidential is shared in a secure and safe manner.  As researchers update their statuses with exciting discoveries or frustrating problems, or create posts, upload videos or otherwise document their work, this content becomes accessible to hundreds of fellow university researchers through activity feeds and searches, making it possible for providential inter-disciplinary connections to be made and new insights to be generated. Read More »

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The Power of Fresh Thinking about Video…

Every year, my emerging technologies marketing team works with a variety of undergrad and graduate MBA programs around the world on projects related to enterprise video.

This fall, we embarked on a project with the San Jose State Gary J Sbona Honors program to take a look at the emerging enterprise video content category. Last week, the team gave us their readout.

Four students came to present: Hillary Anderson, Tamara Gardner, Sandra Kaminski and My Phung.

We asked them to think about how organizations can use video internally and externally. Their conclusions were profound and represent a unique perspective from a group that has grown up with digital video and mobile technologies.

All four recognized the newness of enterprise video for communications, collaboration and content. They astutely observed that while the benefits of video content at work—for organizational communications, meetings, training, safety, or events—is well understood, the main obstacle is changing behavior.

Read More »

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How Cisco IT Organizes Its Voice Operations

How many people does it take to manage the service infrastructure supporting over 150,000 hardware phones, 50,000 soft phones, and 10,000 room and desktop video devices. That’s the size of our UC infrastructure at Cisco, and today we manage all our voice, voicemail, and video services with an integrated voice and video Tier 3 operations team of 25 people, and another 5 people supporting contact center applications and services. We do this by continually finding new efficiencies – learning new ways to support existing services so we can spend more time learning how to support the new technologies.

Read More »

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Reflections on the Top Five Developments of 2011

It’s that time of year:  take a break, reflect, maybe clean up the hard drive.

I had a chance to do the reflection part last week, and came up with what I hope is a pretty good weave of what Service Providers experienced over the last 12 months.

Here is my ‘take’ on the top five trends of the whirlwind year that is still, for a week or two, 2011:

1.    In the crawl-walk-run sequence as it relates to the global shift to all-IP, 2011 went from “crawl” to “jog” — skipping “walk” entirely.

Think about it. Think about all of it, which is a lot, when it comes to the global transition to all-IP: Fixed networks; mobile Internet, Video, Cloud.

Across the world, wherever there is IP, there was monumental change in 2011. While 2010 was a year of anticipation and preparation, 2011 teemed with news and trends about the burgeoning Internet: more Video, more emphasis on mobile broadband; more work on keeping the “big iron” routing and switching fabrics around the world plumbed to keep up with demand.

We continued to do our best to keep up with the enormity of all-IP, with our ongoing VNI (Visual Networking Index) and Cloud Index forecasts. We’re still anticipating a quadrupling of Internet traffic by 2015, mostly because of video usage by mobile and “connected” IP devices. Lots more data here.

2.    Video (still) trumps as the biggest driver in Internet / IP usage. Read More »

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