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Cisco Networked Video Strategy: The Cisco Difference in Video

Part 2 of a 4-part series

In part one of this series, Cisco Video Collaboration Group SVP Marthin De Beer kicked off our exploration of the new Cisco Video strategy unveiled at Cisco Live 2012 in San Diego.

Video drives more traffic than any other application on the network and it’s changing how people communicate, collaborate, and consume content and entertainment. By 2016, we forecast 86% of traffic on networks will be video.

Using video is about the optimal experience for the task at hand – it is about creating that in-person experience from immersive TelePresence, but also about creating the best possible experience when you are on the road participating via your iPad.

When it comes to video, Cisco does three things differently to ensure superior end-to-end video experiences with greater efficiencies:

  • Architectural Approach: The Cisco Medianet architecture delivers superior experiences and efficiencies by integrating video capabilities all the way from the network to the application. Cisco video endpoints use Medianet to discover and configure themselves, dramatically reducing deployment cost. Medianet infrastructure provides detailed performance information, which allows IT organizations to detect and fix problems in a fraction of the time required by traditional approaches. Medianet also helps companies leverage existing investments to build new capabilities more cost efficiently, such as adding recording and sharing to TelePresence or providing common call control for voice and video endpoints. Cisco’s advantage comes from the network, which allows us to build and manage systems that best “understand” network performance, complexity, interactivity, and capacity.  While Medianet provides compelling experience and total cost of ownership advantages today, we believe an architectural approach like Medianet will become absolutely required as video becomes pervasive.

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Collaboration Technologies – Taking the Labor out of Healthcare Communications

Like most families, we are looking forward to the long Labor Day weekend.  It will be filled with family, ribs, beer, some yard work, and yes, some Cisco work.  And this year we will have a new guest.  The latest member of the Barney family, Hayden, arrived just in time to celebrate Labor Day weekend.  Although I am sure her mother is not looking back fondly on her recent labors, the rest of the family is.  And we are all grateful for the healthy little girl.

But I will have to tear myself away from Hayden, ribs, beer, and yard work for, yes, Cisco work.  But that won’t be as painful as it sounds.  Thanks to the advanced technologies at Cisco I can work from home.  The way I ‘labor’ has definitely changed.  I can collaborate over videoconference on my Cisco Telepresence EX-90 with a few of my colleagues to finish up a project while never leaving my house. I live in Ohio, and while my team is located in San Jose, for a few hours on Saturday it will be as if they are all at my house – except they have to get their own beer.

Cisco has changed the way we labor in many important ways, but no more so than when it comes to clinical care.  Cisco has created a platform with unified communications and video-based collaboration that is transforming the patient experience and clinical processes by bringing together physicians, specialists, therapists, patients and families together.  This collaboration can take place quickly without anyone getting into a car, train, plane or boat.  And it becomes stunning when you think about how this can impact the care of a child.

Imagine your child needs cardiac surgery.  And he needs a specialist.  But that specialist is several hours away from your home.  At the Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, Co-Medical Director Professor Martin Elliott, a pediatric cardio-thoracic surgeon uses information and collaboration technologies to improve the quality of care and the experience for the child and its family in a very meaningful way.  Listen to Professor Elliott discuss the experience for the medical team, the child, and the family as they prepare the child for surgery.

 

Collaboration technologies can improve not just the pre-surgical experience, but the follow-up care as well.

For the past 14 years, Dr. Patrick Byrne from Greater Baltimore Medical Center Johns Hopkins University has been making annual trips to countries in the developing world, volunteering his services to correct cleft and lip palate deformities in children. However, in many countries, including Nicaragua, the required post-surgical speech therapy care is simply not available. Using WebEx technology, Dr. Byrne and team can now provide that specialized treatment remotely for the first time ever. Within just three months of speech therapy conducted via WebEx, the doctors saw significant improvement in patients’ speech. The online meeting technology also proved the perfect tool to train local providers on best practices for follow-up procedures.  Listen in…

 

 

 

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Telepresence Goes Hollywood

Throughout its history, Hollywood has been known for using and featuring some of the most advanced technology in its films. On May 18, Universal Studios’ latest film, Battleship, will be next on the list to showcase how far technology has come – featuring Cisco TelePresence front and center to connect scientists, NASA and the U.S. Air Force when it really matters. Take a look for yourself:
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The Engagement Factor & Collaboration

Have you ever sent an e-mail that’s been misinterpreted and it took a long time to sort out the miscues? I have. And I suspect that many of you reading this blog have too.

So, it wasn’t surprising to see that a recent study by the Economist Intelligent Unit found that 88% of business leaders feel that a significant misunderstanding will slow them down. And 75% believe that in-person collaboration is critical to their business success. Perhaps that’s because 54% consider gauging engagement and focus to be the most important part of communications. And you do that through a combination of visual and audio cues, such as facial expressions, gestures and body language, tone of voice.

In my own interactions I do believe this is critical, but in today’s world you can’t always be there in person. Read More »

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It’s Not Enough to Be Connected

I attended Enterprise Connect for the ninth time this year, but it was the first time I delivered a keynote address. With the advances in technology today I could have delivered my keynote via TelePresence from Oslo, my home town in Norway. But I chose to attend in person because in this case face-to-face was the best way to tell my story.

I spoke to how “It is not enough to be connected.” This may sound strange coming from me, especially since I represent “the” networking company, but Cisco has evolved, as technology, businesses, and customer needs have evolved. Just being connected is not enough to drive the next levels of productivity. So, we need to think beyond connectivity. Read More »

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