Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > SP360: Service Provider

CES 2011: Kicking it off, together

What do smart phones, tablet computers, PCs, washers, dryers, TVs, content providers, medical devices and even athletic shoes have in common?

Yes, they will all be taking part in the excitement generated during CES 2011, happening this week in Las Vegas.  But what’s more, the most common denominator among the major breakthroughs and hot products is they all need to be connected to be truly useful.

And not just connected, but easy to use and seamlessly integrated with other aspects of our life.  These expectations are part of our DNA with more and more converting to a connected life.  Increasingly, our connected life involves increasing use of video to communicate, connect and engage with our family and friends.

Cisco has long been involved in the video space and announced Cisco Videoscape at a pre-CES conference yesterday.  Cisco Videoscape brings entertainment together from infinite sources of content from pay TV, online and on-demand and combines it with the social media, communications, and mobility to create a truly immersive TV experience. Read More »

Tags: , , , ,

A Big Tent for TV sets

Observing this incredibly diverse CES crowd in Las Vegas, there is one demographic  notably absent – the obsolete TV set.  As I pondered a few weeks ago, when our industry strives to invent the future of entertainment, we can’t selfishly focus on our own needs as viewers.  We must consider the devices in this ecosystem and remember that TVs are people too, afterall.

With Videoscape, CES is now an event filled with possibility, not only for the Gentry appliances, but for now older TV sets and other devices as well.  We now have the ability to view all devices with mutual respect, where TV’s will be judged by their character and how they work with the network and its clouds and not by their bunny ears or how they on their own can only deliver a small subset of content. Read More »

Tags: , , ,

The History and Future of TV

From the first electromechanical television (the “pantelegraph,” in case it slipped your mind…), to the 64 million people who tuned into a website to view the 2010 World’s cup — and for the 168 years separating those two events — the ways by which we consume video entertainment morphed many times over.

Experience television’s transformation yourself by clicking into The History and Future of Television. It’s a comprehensive compilation of the technical and societal influences that shaped television – to learn from the past, and move with confidence into the changing landscape ahead..   Read More »

Tags: , , , , ,

The History and Future of Television

You may recall that when we launched the Connected Life Exchange blog we pointed our visitors to a unique microsite called the “Discovery of Data” — an interactive anthology of telecommunication innovation events and the related historical facts.

Today, you can visit and explore yet another fun and informative site. The topic is “The History and Future of TV” – society and technology have evolved and converged to create new video experiences. Those that are more social, mobile and personal.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , ,

The End of TV?

While traveling this week I had the opportunity to read David Meerman Scott’s great new book, Real-Time Marketing, dealing with the new ways that marketers are engaging with their customers.  It is a definite worthwhile read, full of examples of how the case studies highlighted there could be applied to our business…but what struck me was that TV isn’t really as much of a factor anymore as it used to be…

In industry journals, there has been an on-going debate about the extent of “cord-cutting,”  the act of a consumer like you or me (also considered a subscriber by the service providers themselves) deciding to cancel their cable or IPTV service now that they can view a show via the internet, say from a service like iTunes or Hulu in the U.S.  Conflicting statistics are being quoted left and right by different sides of the argument, which reminds me of Chris Brogan’s hilarious quote at a presentation I saw him give this Summer which, paraphrased, is “83.7 percent of all statistics are false.”   Now I’m not saying one side or another is false but are likely just looking at the situation from different perspectives.  Regardless of who’s right and what the extent really is, there is certainly some element of truth to it which means TV isn’t as much of a factor anymore as it used to be…

Personally, I wouldn’t want to get rid of my TV service. Without being able to get my Formula 1 fix or watching the Longhorn game (which in Austin is mandatory for citizenship), it would be like all the sacrifice but none of the grace of joining a monastery.   But I have to admit that in my daily life, I am spending more time than ever with my tablet, PC, and phone…and as much as I love my TV, it isn’t really as much of a factor as it used to be…
Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,