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Video Demystified on TechWiseTV

February 15, 2013 at 8:34 am PST
TechWiseTV Video Collaboration Infrasturcture

TechWiseTV Video Collaboration Infrasturcture

We do a lot of shows about video of course.  It’s always a challenge I think when it comes to defining what the unique value of a given story needs to be.  In this case, we were not featuring newly announced technology, which greatly simplifies the direction for us -- but we were considering what we thought were some unmet needs.

Our goal for this episode:  To make Cisco video for collaboration more approachable for every customer. 

Cisco does a lot of things in the broad category of ‘video.’  With more than 8,000 engineers working on video innovation, Cisco is a video powerhouse. Our teams have filed 1,700 video-related patents in the last five years. Innovations include TelePresence, Videoscape, Show and Share, Media Experience Engine, and Pulse Analytics. Internal innovation has been augmented with acquisitions including  NDSTANDBERGBNI VideoInlet, and ExtendMedia.

As we talked to customers and experts within Cisco, we kept coming back to a structure best defined as ‘where are you now’.  In other words, video itself is not new as a concept…but as we narrow down to say this is about interactive video…it became helpful to consider where most Cisco customers might be starting from:

  • Cisco Voice -- you are familiar with call manager but have not explored the video capabilities inherent to the platform.
  • Telepresence - you have some high quality video deployed but its special…only for high end events or people.
  • Tandberg -- you are good with video but its a distinct system from your other communications -- Cisco or otherwise
  • Third Party and Cave Dwellers -- Anything from non-Cisco mixed environments to the luddites among us.

Why Every Company Needs To Create A Video Strategy

The assumption is that video is valuable and that the more pervasive and simple it can become in your organization, the more competitive and nimble you can be.  So, with value established, the question becomes about execution.

Our executive guest has a very diverse business and video background who joined us from Tandberg. Jacob Nordan is Senior Director of Product Management for the Collaboration Business Unit. Powers had the honor of hosting his interview. Jacob set the tone for us by highlighting not just our success with various customers, but specifics around how these leaders were using video to pioneer change in their business.

More Reading: Jacob’s Blog Entry on Adopting a Video Strategy

Nathan Shaw joined us for our segment on ‘Understanding Video Endpoints.’  Nathan has been a guest on our show dating back to the very first Telepresence show we did where we helped him load up a Toyota 4-Runner with a CTS 500 so we could get it in the studio. Nathan is an awesome guy with a great background -- AND…he is a gushing, proud new father.  Could not be happier for him…and very impressed with his photography skills.

From endpoints, we pursued  ‘Understanding Video Infrastructure’ with Cynthia Lee.  She was a bundle of energy grabbing the pen from Jimmy Ray to help us understand where things like MCU’s and Border Controllers become important to achieve certain video communication objectives.

More Reading: Video Infrastructure Components

Jimmy Ray did a Master Class on the intersection of video and security.  Its was pure fun with Network Address Translation (NAT), Application Level Gateways (ALG)…avoiding risk and things that will go bump in the night.

More Reading: Security for Video

We stole a segment from our upcoming new BizTech show that covered some advancements in using ‘Remote Expert’.

We wrapped up with Phil Marachel.  We wanted Phil on to talk strategy as he is with our Cisco Services team.  His street creed for video is fantastic however as he was doing video way before it was mainstream. As an engineer Phil worked on the biggest systems from PictureTel, the first MultiPoint bridges from Accord…all giants in the earlier years of video.

Hope you enjoyed the show.  This is officially episode number 126 of TechWiseTV and we are loving the support you all continue to show us.

See you in the field!

Robb (& Jimmy Ray)

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More from London – Unified as ONE

February 7, 2013 at 9:16 am PST

BugEyes
I was really impressed with Cisco Live London..for those of you who took the time to shake our hand and say hello…THANK YOU!  You make us feel like geek rock stars!  Good thing the doors are really big at these conferences so my inflated ego could still make it through.  I mentioned our Fundamentals of Converged Wireless and Wireless Access yesterday…but there are a few more detailed videos surrounding this Unified Access Launch that were definitely worth mentioning.
 
First off -- Jimmy Ray gets with Muhammad Imam so that he can demonstrate the new controls for QoS on wired or wireless now.  
 
We circle back with another friend, Sachin Gupta, to hear what kind of feedback we are getting back from both geeks and others who have actually already deployed the Catalyst 3850. The pricing is extremely attractive on this…no extra cost even though this is a HUGE revolution from the previous 3700 series. 
 
Perhaps a bit overshadowed, but really should not be overlooked, are the changes we see within the 5760. As the first IOS based Wireless LAN Controller -- this new release has identical commands for configuration and management as you do with the 3850. Great example of the ONE Network we speak of now on such a regular basis.

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Wired and Wireless Convergence

February 6, 2013 at 8:39 am PST

Lots of big announcements around the new Catalyst 3850 that are very very interesting for how we design networks.  Check out our latest ‘Fundamentals’ to fully appreciate what has been accomplished here!

Thanks for watching as always!

Robb

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Blink: You’re Too Slow

December 11, 2012 at 8:04 am PST

When playing in the high speed switching game -- timing is everything.  Timing ‘sets the pace’ for visibility to established the ‘where and when,’ correlation across a broad computing environment plus compliance and digital forensics with precision time stamps.  Every element of the data center requires accurate timing at a level that leaves no room for error.

Speed is the other, more celebrated, if not obvious requirement, for the high speed switching game.  Speed that is measured in increments requiring some new additions to my vocabulary.

When looking at the ways in which we measure speed and regulate time throughout the network, I was of course familiar with NTP or Network Time Protocol.   NTP provides millisecond timing…which, crazy enough…is WAY TOO SLOW for this high speed market.   Now being from the South, I may blink a little slower than other people but I read that the average time it takes to blink an eye…is 300 to 400 milliseconds!  A millisecond is a thousandth of a second.  That is considered slow?

Turns out ‘micro-second’ level detail is our next consideration.  A microsecond is equal to one millionth (10−6 or 1/1,000,000) of a second. One microsecond is to one second as one second is to 11.54 days. To keep our blinking example alive: 350,000 microseconds.  Still too slow.

Next unit of measure?  The Nanosecond. A nanosecond is one billionth of a second.  One nanosecond is to one second as one second is to 31.7 years.  Time to blink is just silly at this point.

At one point in time I used to think higher speeds were attainable with higher degrees of bandwidth.  This may be why the idea of ‘low latency’ seems so counter-intuitive. As you hopefully understand at this point, there are limitations to how fast data can move and that real gains in this area can only be achieved through gains in efficiency -- in other words, the elimination (as much as possible) of latency.

For ethernet, speed really is about latency.  Ethernet switch latency is defined as the time it takes for a switch to forward a packet from its ingress port to its egress port. The lower the latency, the faster the device can transmit packets to its final destination.  Also important within this ‘need for speed’ is avoiding packet loss. The magic is in within the balancing act: speed and accuracy that challenge our understanding of traditional physics.

Cisco’s latest entrant to the world of high speed trading brings us the Nexus 3548.  A slim 48 port line rate switch with latency as low as 190 nanoseconds. It includes a Warp switch port analyzer (SPAN) feature that facilitates the efficient delivery of stock market data to financial trading servers in as littles as 50 nanoseconds and multiple other tweaks we uncover in this 1 hour deep dive into the fastest switch on the market. The first new member of the 2nd generation Nexus 3000 family.   (We featured the first generation Nexus 3000 series in April 2011)

This is a great show -- it moves fast!

Segment Outline:

  •  - Robb & Jimmy Ray with Keys to the Show
  •  - Berna Devrim introduces us to Cisco Algo Boost and the Nexus 3548
  •  - Will Ochandarena gives us a hardware show and tell
  •  - Jacob Rapp walks us through a few live simulations
  •  - Chih-Tsung, ASIC designer walks us through the custom silicon

 

Further Reading:

- Nexus 3548 Press Release

 

Cisco Blogs

Jacob Rapp:  Benchmarking at Ultra-Low Latency

Gabriel Dixon: The Algo Boost Series

Dave Malik: Cisco Innovation provides Competitive Advantage

 

 

 

 

 

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Pushing the Presentation Envelope

December 10, 2012 at 7:49 am PST
The TechWiseTV Fundamentals series continues to enjoy a great run -- this concept of character animation and tight scripting we started with back in the early TrustSec and EnergyWise days, is still a complete joy to work on. We have learned a ton about getting the scripts tighter, writing to support visuals, how to stay technical and not try to say too much AND all the work that goes into storyboarding the visuals, working with artists and motion graphic experts.  There was an element, however, we had never considered before -- in my mind perhaps because I thought it was furthest from our capability.
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