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Revamping the MSE User Interface

As part of the WLC 8.0 release, we addressed customer comments and revamped the user interface (UI) for the MSE. We wanted to make it easier for customers using both MSE and PI to adjust to larger deployments. We also wanted to quicken the pace at which we could deliver features to the customers. Today I want to walk you through the landing page and configuration of the new MSE UI.

Landing Page

The landing page is the first thing one sees when logging into  the MSE UI. This page provides the user with a basic snapshot of system health, an easy way to launch the apps, and a quick status of the various services on MSE.

System Health

The new UI highlights important parameters like CPU and Memory usage in order to give the user an indication of the stress being handled by the MSE.

 mseui1 Read More »

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Not All 802.11ac AP’s are Created Equal: Demand the Full Story

It’s always interesting and often entertaining to observe how competitors promote their products and what they choose to focus on—and more importantly, what they choose not to focus on and what they hope people won’t ask questions about.

Consider yet again how a competitor chooses to position their “purpose built” AP vs. the Cisco Aironet 3700 802.11ac Access Point Series.

This competitor frequently (and somewhat obsessively) points out that its 802.11ac AP has dual “active” 800 MHz cores while the Cisco AP3700 has only one “active” 800 MHz core. This is not completely true since it completely overlooks the fact that the Cisco AP3700 also has a dedicated CPU core and DSP for each radio subsystem.

Furthermore, it also overlooks that the dual “active” cores in the competitor’s AP share 512 MB of DRAM. The single “active” core of the AP3700 has dedicated 512 MB of DRAM. Also each radio subsystem has a dedicated 128 MB DRAM (for 768 MB total DRAM in the AP3700).

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Why is all of this important? Read More »

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Staying Connected at Northern Kentucky University

July 3, 2014 at 9:07 am PST

Northern Kentucky University is among the fastest growing universities in Kentucky. It hosts over 15,000 students with about 13,000 undergraduate and 2,000 graduate students. The goal of the wireless program at NKU is to provide secure, robust and ubiquitous wireless access throughout the campus, both indoors and outdoors. This ensures that students always stay connected and feel at home. The classrooms are equipped with smart technology to ensure that the teachers can benefit from technology when collaborating with students. The IT team has blanketed the libraries, the classrooms, the dorm-rooms as well as the outdoor areas with Wi-Fi. In the previous blog in 2012, we described how the Cisco 7.5 release allows networks to recover with no client re-authentication in the rare event of your primarily wireless LAN controller goes down.

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At a Glance:

Located in: the Highland Heights Kentucky

Number of students: 15,000 of which about 2000 stay in residence halls

Number of teachers/staff: 2000

# WLAN clients: Approximately 8500 concurrent clients

Access-Point Model and Units:  1200 units of AP models including AP702W, 3502, 3602, 3702, 1550 and a few older Access Points which are being phased out

Controller Model and Units: 2 Pairs of WiSM2 operating in 7.6.120.0

Switch Models: Various models 2960, 3650, 3850, 3750X and 6500

Prime Infrastructure: 1.4.2

Mobility Services Engine: 7.6

 Deployment Details: We talked to Christopher Johnson, the Senior Infrastructure Systems Analyst II at Northern Kentucky University to capture some of his thoughts around their choice of this solution and the associated benefits. Read More »

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BYOD on a University Campus: A Student’s Perspective

There is a new generation of college students out there, I would know as I recently was one of them.  Information being at your fingertips is no longer a luxury, it is a necessity.  Professors’ expectations of their students have increased dramatically due to the wealth of information on mobile devices.  Every class I attended leveraged some form of wireless access to the web.  Instant message in response to real-time questions and online submissions are just two of many examples of how network access has been integrated into the education system.  Professors would consistently use online tools such as online drop boxes for projects and web conferencing tools.  According to MarketWire 92% of college students feel a laptop is a necessity, this indicates that the requirement of mobile access at a university is a given and the college experience is defined by the ease of that access. 

Professors are on tight schedules and are generally available only at certain times of the day.  Imagine- wanting to contact a professor during open hours only to fall short because your laptop had difficulty getting any kind of connection.  I remember the frustrations of wanting to revisit PowerPoint presentations on a class website in the library, only to realize that I was sitting by the one window notorious for being a wireless dead zone.  Dorms were infamous for spotty coverage.  Having the dorm room located closest to the access point for best access was purely by luck of the draw.  I was not so lucky.  In my dorm, you would not get any wireless access unless you were sitting right next to the hallway.  That’s why I am especially envious of the students of Colorado University, whose alma mater upgraded to enterprise-class coverage. 

Read More »

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Cisco Optical Network System (ONS) listed on UC APL!

May 29, 2012 at 10:56 am PST

The Global Certification Team (GCT) is proud to announce the following additions to the Unified Capabilities Approved Products List (UC APL):

    • Cisco ONS 15310-Customer Location (CL) Rel. 9.2.1 TN 1023001, as a Fixed Network Element (F-NE).
      • The Cisco ONS 15310-CL SONET Multiservice Platform is an economical, 1-rack unit (1RU)-high delivery platform optimized for use as the last network element—at the customer location (CL)—in a service provider’s network, or for use as an end node in enterprise or campus environments. The Cisco ONS 15310-CL takes advantage of the proven technology pioneered by the Cisco ONS 15454, the industry’s first and leading multiservice optical transport platform.
    • Cisco ONS 15310-Metro Access (MA) Rel. 9.2.1 TN 1023002, as a F-NE.
      • The Cisco ONS15310-MA is a carrier-class MSPP that efficiently switches Ethernet and TDM traffic for use in metropolitan and regional optical networks. With the flexibility and scalability that allow it to support DS1, DS3/EC1, OC-3 to OC-48 SONET, and Ethernet interfaces, the ONS 15310-MA is already a part of many North American service providers multiservice SONET and next-generation “triple play” and IPTV deployment strategies.
    • Cisco ONS 15454 Multiservice Provisioning Platform (MSPP) Rel. 9.2.1 TN 1023003, as a F-NE.
      • The Cisco ONS 15454 SONET Multiservice Provisioning Platform (MSPP) provides the functions of multiple network elements in a single platform. It supports common interfaces such as DS-1, DS-3, and EC-1 and data solutions including 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet solutions with OC-3 through OC-192 optical transport bit rates and integrated DWDM wavelengths.
    • Cisco ONS 15454 Multiservice Transport Platform (MSTP) Rel. 9.2.1 TN 10230047, as a F-NE.
      • The Cisco ONS 15454 Multiservice Transport Platform (MSTP) is the most deployed metropolitan-area (metro) and regional dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) solution in the world featuring two- through eight-degree reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM) technology that enables wavelength provisioning across entire networks and eliminates the need for optical-to-electrical-to-optical (OEO) transponder conversions. The ONS 15454 MSTP interconnects with Layer-2, Layer-3 and storage area network (SAN) devices at rates up to 40 Gbps. It delivers any service type to any network location and supports all DWDM topologies.

 

The approval document is posted on the UC APL site at the following URL: https://aplits.disa.mil/processAPList.do

 

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