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Laying the foundation for tomorrow: A New 802.11ac module for Aironet 3600

You no doubt already know about the coming 802.11ac wireless standard. And, if you’re facing a future bandwidth crunch due to the demands of increased Wi-Fi client density because of BYOD, you’re probably wondering how to prepare for the increased capacity and performance made possible by 802.11ac.  So what can you do now, given that enterprise-class products that support the standard won’t be available until 2013?

The Cisco Aironet 3600 access point can help you bridge the gap between what you need today and what you want for tomorrow. Deploy an Aironet 3600 with 802.11n, and you’ll get a future-proof investment that delivers industry-leading performance now—without sacrificing the ability to add the scale of 802.11ac later.

Take a look under the hood of the 3600 and you’ll see the only 802.11n access point on the market today that supports 802.11n-based  4×4 MIMO with three spatial streams and Cisco’s CleanAir and ClientLink technologies. That means you can get an average of 33% percent better performance right now on mobile devices, and use up to 38% less battery on Wi-Fi clients.

What you’ll also see is a modular slot. This is where the industry’s very first enterprise class 802.11ac solution comes in. Literally. When 802.11ac products are certified in early 2013, you can simply plug a Cisco 802.11ac radio module into the slot and immediately upgrade your access point to leverage the new standard.

This is the second module announced for the Aironet 3600, joining the spectrum monitoring module.  The spectrum module scans all Wi-Fi channels in succession (not just the one the AP uses for traffic), giving outstanding visibility for mission-critical applications, security scanning, and interference troubleshooting.

The bottom line is you can get leading performance today while you future-proof your investment for tomorrow. In other words, there’s no longer a need to compromise. You can act now and lay the groundwork for tomorrow.

Find out more about 802.11ac fundamentals here and look for upcoming webinars about the Aironet 3600 soon.

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Helping the Open Internet to Thrive

Though we often take it for granted, the global data network is one of the wonders of our world.  Without that network, users around the world would not be able to surf the web, post video and text, and communicate with each other using voice, chat, and e-mail.

The success of the global data network rests on interoperability standards that were created by standards development organizations like the IETF, IEEE, ITU-T, and W3C.  In those organizations, expert technologists meet to create the standards that define how different products made by different vendors will work together.  Without standards, the Internet as we know it would not exist.

Cisco is proud that our employees have played leading roles in the creation of interoperability standards, just as they have invented many of the foundational technologies used in the global data network.  As a result of their efforts, Cisco has a portfolio of telecom and networking patents, including patents required to implement widely used interoperability standards, that is second to none.

While we have been at the forefront of networking technology, we recognize that our customers want technically excellent products and products that work well together.  For example, our unified communications customers often use Cisco products for voice and video, but products from our competitors for e-mail or instant messaging.  They are sometimes frustrated when products they purchase from different vendors don’t work well together, or when using products from one vendor forces them to implement proprietary voice or video protocols that do not enjoy broad industry support.   In unified communications, as in other areas, collaboratively developed standards are a common language that products made by different vendors can use to make their products work together, creating a better experience for customers.

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Contributing to retail industry – Cisco participation in industry standards bodies

One of the areas Cisco contributes  to the retail industry is in the participation in industry organizations and standards bodies to help broaden adoption and encourage interopability of technologies.

Cisco retail architects Christian Janoff and Bart McGlothin both contribute to industry organizations.  Christian Janoff has just been re-elected to the Payment Card Industry board of advisors.  Bart McGlothin current sits on the  technical committee of National Retail Federation  ARTS Group (Association of Retail Technology Standards ) as vice chair of the mobile integration workteam.

I sat down with Bart and talked about the role of Cisco at ARTS and retail industry standards contribution.

ARTS (Association of Retail Technology Standards ) is the technical arm for industry standards for National Retail Federation.  ARTS develop white papers, best practices and standards used in in-house retail solutions as well as vendor products.

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How Do You Balance Network Innovation with Standards?

Do you recall what it was like before email? Nah, me neither. If you were around for the pre-email/pre-personal computer era, you may recall sending someone a letter written using a pen and paper. The only way the letter would arrive safely was (and still is) to affix a stamp to it. Feels like ancient history now when it’s possible to email a message around the globe within a matter of moments.

Suffice it to say, technology has advanced the method and speed at which we communicate. But innovation hasn’t happened in a vacuum; the standards governing the technology industry have evolved, too. Just imagine what your digital life would be like if we didn’t create standards. Would you want to put postage stamps on your email messages?

Of course, the question is, how do you balance innovation with standards? Without standards, you may miss out on the brilliant innovations that have come before (security and a framework that keeps things running smoothly, to name a couple). But rely too heavily on standards and you miss out on future innovation.

In our continuing coverage of the Seven Myths Around the Good-Enough Network on Silicon Angle, we explore myth number four–The Standards Myth.

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Multi-vendor MPLS-TP Interoperability Demonstrated for Packet Transport Networks

Widely deployed from the core to the edge, IP/MPLS has achieved huge success as a mature, standards-based technology now deployed by virtually every service provider worldwide.  As a result, the industry has chosen to extend IP/MPLS and develop a transport profile called MPLS-TP (MPLS Transport Profile). MPLS-TP is the packet transport technology of choice being developed by the IETF to allow service providers to cost effectively migrate existing transport networks to packet based solutions.

Recently EANTC conducted an MPLS-TP Interoperability Event which focused on testing and demonstrating interoperability of key IP/MPLS and Carrier Ethernet features between multiple vendor platforms. This represented a critical technology demonstration for service providers as they begin their migration to packet transport networks.

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