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Walking in a Winter Wonderland

It is not uncommon to see an anti-spam system catch >99% of the spam passing through it. Most of the best anti-spam systems catch >99.9% of spam. In this environment, spammers try just about anything to evade spam filters. Some spammers believe that blasting at high volume is the key to success. Others believe complete randomization of the message headers will confuse the anti-spam system. Still others take a minimalist approach, sending only a URL in the body. As anti-spam systems close gaps in their coverage, spammers are forced to find new tricks (or resort to variations on old tricks). It’s an arms race.

Screen-Shot-2014-05-24-at-5.24.29-AM-300x224One spam technique in particular is attracting more and more spammers. This technique is known in the email industry as “snowshoe” spam. Snowshoes are footwear that allows a person to walk over deep snow by distributing their weight over a larger surface area, thus preventing the wearer’s foot from sinking. But what do snowshoes have to do with unsolicited bulk email? In the email world “snowshoe” spam is unsolicited bulk email that is sent using a large number of IP addresses, and at a low message volume per IP address.

Cisco’s worldwide sensor network records details about a substantial quantity of spam. We analyze this large dataset for trends among senders. Below is a breakdown of spam by sender type. Note that the volume of snowshoe spam has more than doubled since November 2013.

Screen-Shot-2014-05-24-at-4.38.13-AM-300x105

Spam broken down by Sender Type

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