Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Collaboration

Breaking Barriers with SIP Trunking – Cisco Emerges as Market Leader in New Infonetics Market Share 2012 Report

The way that enterprises connect to the outside world is changing. The transition to voice over IP (VoIP) that began with enterprise networks a decade ago, is now in full force in service provider networks. In a report issued on Monday, Infonetics Research reported that Cisco, the global market leader for unified communications and collaboration, is now the new market leader in global enterprise session border control (SBC) solutions for the first half of 2012, providing secure IP connectivity from the enterprise edge to the service provider session initiation protocol (SIP) trunking service.

Why is this so important? Service providers are now offering SIP trunking services instead of legacy dial tone (also known as time-division-multiplexing or TDM) to connect to enterprises of all sizes, including small businesses. In fact, according to their 2012 VoIP and UC Services Report, Infonetics forecasts SIP trunks to grow over 66 percent in 2012 alone.  Customers are quickly embracing the new technology, which offers substantial cost savings and the promise of extending real-time rich-media collaboration applications beyond the enterprise to customers, partners and suppliers.

To begin realizing the benefits of SIP trunking, businesses need to deploy a session border controller in order to efficiently and securely connect to service providers while preserving voice quality and features. Session border controllers connect IP networks and provide session control, security, demarcation for better troubleshooting and interworking to help overcome differences in the deployment of the SIP standard (such as CODEC or signaling).

Cisco reinvents the collaboration edge

Cisco’s session border controller, called, Cisco Unified Border Element (CUBE) is a software license add-on to the widely deployed Cisco Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) and Aggregation Services Routers (ASRs). CUBE provides significant benefits over competitors’ stand-alone session border controller offerings.  For example, CUBE enables customers to transition more smoothly to SIP trunking while reducing costs and operational complexity, often requiring no new hardware to be purchased or deployed. As a result, CUBE has been adopted by over 5,000 customers in 160 countries.

In their report, Infonetics credited Cisco’s differentiated model for delivering SIP trunking service, stating: “This is a natural extension of Cisco’s dominant market position in the router market—the majority of organizations have Cisco routers already installed and deployed at the important network border points.”

Other benefits of CUBE include: Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Fresh Video from the Interop Show Floor in VEGAS!

May 9, 2012 at 5:20 am PST

Chattin with Prashanth at Interop Vegas

Having a lot of fun this year at Interop 2012. We are shooting and editing in a much tighter workflow so that we can publish these things same day and thank gosh!  The stories are numerous and oh so timely.   Follow along as I attempt to recap our first full day on the show floor.

Meet PAM

Jim Frey recently wrote a white paper called Closing the Loop for Effective Network Operations Management and he stopped by to chat about some of the key points made.

As he describes it: Cisco has developed and introduced Prime Assurance Manager with one essential goal in mind – to provide end-to-end operational monitoring visibility, spanning data center to and through the branch, as a means for facilitating efficient operations and proactively protecting network-delivered applications and network availability, network performance, application performance, and end user experience data across both wired and wireless environments, coupled with troubleshooting and reporting features.

Jim is going to be going even deeper with an hour long seminar on May 15.

My First Cloud

Yair Dolev was our guest for the topic of ‘Intelligent Automation for the Cloud’ now in a cool starter Edition!

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Contact Center SIP Trunks Part 2 — Reducing Costs and Improving Call Control for Outsourced Contact Centers – Future Directions

In my  first blog I described how Cisco IT is interconnecting our outsourced Contact Centers using SIP trunks, replacing the more costly (and less effective) PSTN trunks.  In our first round of SIP trunk deployments we expect to save almost 25% of our current contact center calling costs (or $2M per year).  But there were other, less tangible benefits as well.
Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Contact Center SIP Trunks Part 1 — Reducing Costs and Improving Call Control for Outsourced Contact Centers Today

Cisco has partnered with several outsourced vendors over the years for initial handling of many front-line calls and general information inquiries.  Connecting these vendor environments into a single Cisco customer contact environment is critical for good customer care, but costly and not always easy.  However, early this year we made a change:  we’re using SIP trunking and Cisco Unified Border Element to bring us much closer together, and save money into the bargain.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

How Cisco is Using SIP Trunks to Reduce Calling Costs

Like many large enterprises, Cisco makes a lot of phone calls.  Cisco previously used a lot of TDM trunks from multiple carriers to carry thousands of voice calls from our North American Cisco offices to the PSTN. The problem is, we had over 100 TDM trunks we were paying for every month, to carry our voice calls for these sites.  Four years ago we started looking around for a more cost-effective and manageable way to support all these calls.  After a good deal of searching, screening vendors and testing, we finally found it, using Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) trunking technology.

For the Cisco campuses in San Jose and Research Triangle Park (RTP), we will replace over a hundred PRI (23 channel) TDM trunks, used for long-distance voice calls for all of our North American sites, with SIP trunks.  The new San Jose link is a 250 Mbps SIP trunk carved out of a 10 Gigabit Ethernet WAN access line, while the RTP link is a 20 Mbps SIP trunk carved out of a 45 Mbps DS3 WAN access line. Together, these SIP trunks give us the capacity to carry over 2400 concurrent calls and a total voice call volume of 2 million minutes per month.
Read More »

Tags: , , , , ,