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Scope of ‘KeyBoy’ Targeted Malware Attacks

On June 6, 2013, malwaretracker.com released an analysis of Microsoft Office-based malware that was exploiting a previously unknown vulnerability that was patched by MS12-060. The samples provided were alleged to be targeting Tibetan and Chinese Pro-Democracy Activists. On June 7, 2013, Rapid7 released an analysis of malware dubbed ‘KeyBoy,’ also exploiting unknown vulnerabilities in Microsoft Office, similarly patched by MS12-060, but allegedly targeting interests in Vietnam and India. The indicators of compromise (IoCs) listed by Rapid7 match some of the indicators of compromise listed previously by malwaretracker.com.

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Debugger Inception – The Scriptable Debugger Within The Debugger

I recently began working on a toolset to aid with analyzing binary protocols and I decided to use it as an exercise to get more familiar with the Immunity Debugger. I have been using Windbg for a while now, however, I was constantly reading articles discussing how great Immunity Debugger is for exploit development and I had been meaning to take the time to become more familiar with it.

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Post-Exploitation Techniques from Black Hat 2011

In many exploit scenarios, an attacker finds a target and, if possible, establishes remote control over the system through known or unknown exploits. Whether the attacker uses a buffer overflow, insecure configuration, phishing for credentials, or cookie-stealing, the goal is clear: get a remote shell and gain complete control. Then what?

It is this post-exploitation environment that has interested me at this year’s Black Hat 2011. Several talks and trainings discuss post-exploitation techniques, and I’d like to share them in the interest of research – and defense.

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Extracting EXE Drop Malware

In the last few years there has been a major shift in the vulnerability landscape from a focus on attacking network-based server applications to attacking client applications using malicious file formats. Due to this shift there has been a variety of new techniques developed by attackers for more reliable control post-exploitation.

One of the techniques that is commonly used by attackers is the EXE drop. Basically this technique revolves around placing an executable file within the data format in which the vulnerability takes place. Post exploitation, the payload searches for the file descriptor that is associated with the data file, copies the EXE file from it to disk, and executes the EXE file in a new process. Some examples of data formats that are commonly used in an EXE drop exploit are Office documents, Shockwave Flash Files, and image files. The EXE drop technique is useful for several reasons; one reason is because it makes coding the payload easier. The executable can be crafted quickly and compiled for a specific target. Also, by copying an executable file to disk (persistent storage) it’s fairly easy to maintain residency by adding an entry to the autorun registry keys for example.

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Observations from the Darknet

Sometimes it is interesting to take a look at darknet data and see what you come across.  If you are not familiar with the term “darknet,” I am using the definition used by some in the service provider community where a darknet is a set of address space which contains no real hosts. That means no client workstations to initiate conversations with servers on the Internet.  It also means no advertised services from those ranges, such as a webserver, a DNS server, or a database server.  There is really no reason to see any traffic destined for addresses within those ranges.  From a network point of view, it should be as desolate and deserted as the town of Pripyat in the Ukraine, within the evacuation zone due to the Chernobyl disaster back in the 1980s. However, in practice, you do see traffic to those address ranges, which is what makes that traffic somewhat interesting.  Traffic destined to those ranges could be the result of malware attempting to locate machines to infect, part of a research project or it could be as simple as a misconfiguration or a typographical error.  One example of traffic resulting from a typo would come from attempting to ping a host and typing the wrong address in.  However, it would be hard to believe that all of the traffic seen in a darknet is the result of a mistake.

Setting up a darknet does not have to be hard to do.  If your organization has address space that is not being used, then all that you need to do is advertise a route for those addresses and leave them unused.   In our case, we have advertised several ranges and we collect Netflow data for the traffic destined to them from a nearby Cisco router.  That Netflow data is exported to a collector, such as nfcapd, where it is aggregated for further analysis.

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