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Summary: BYOD and Collaboration Don’t Have to be Next National Security Threat

In a world where people are always on the go, it’s only natural that employees will use their own mobile platforms more often for collaboration.  However, the increase in the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) trend for collaboration purposes brings about a number of security concerns in the workplace.

There are multiple capabilities that go into delivering an enterprise-class BYOD solution. The recent attention around the National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance leak may have organizations across the globe reevaluating their strategies when it comes to BYOD security, but there are tools to minimize threats, such as: user authentication, network access control, and remote data wipe

We understand the need for an emphasis on security and have developed the tools to minimize the threat when it comes to your organizations’ BYOD strategy. Please take a look at our CTO of Collaboration, Laurent Philonenko’s recent No Jitter article about the many options and factors to consider when planning your BYOD security strategy.

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Summary: BYOD and Collaboration Don’t Have to be Next National Security Threat

In a world where people are always on the go, it’s only natural that employees will use their own mobile platforms more often for collaboration.  However, the increase in the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) trend for collaboration purposes brings about a number of security concerns in the workplace.

There are multiple capabilities that go into delivering an enterprise-class BYOD solution. The recent attention around the National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance leak may have organizations across the globe reevaluating their strategies when it comes to BYOD security, but there are tools to minimize threats, such as: user authentication, network access control, and remote data wipe

We understand the need for an emphasis on security and have developed the tools to minimize the threat when it comes to your organizations’ BYOD strategy. Please take a look at our CTO of Collaboration, Laurent Philonenko’s recent No Jitter article about the many options and factors to consider when planning your BYOD security strategy.

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TMA? Get Some Relief from Acronym Overload

I see and hear a variety of acronyms being used on a daily basis. I recently heard one tossed around with good humor that makes a point: TMA or Too Many Acronyms. Every once in a while, when I think I’ve embedded the definition and use of an acronym into my long-term memory (anything beyond an extended weekend), it seems as if either a new acronym was spawned, or it has been overloaded with a different meaning. My goal in this blog post is offer both a refresher on some topical acronyms that appear to be quite commonly circulated in security technology circles and media outlets. It is challenging to be a subject matter expert in every aspect of cyber security. Whether you are reading an article, joining a conversation or preparing for a presentation or certification in the realm of cyber security, you may not be completely perplexed by these acronyms when you come across them and become more familiar with them. For situational purposes, I organized the acronyms into categories where I have seen them used frequently and included related links for each of them.

Network Infrastructure

AAAAuthentication, Authorization, and Accounting. This is a set of actions that enable you to control over who is allowed access to the network, what services they are allowed to use once they have access, and track the services and network resources being accessed.

ACL/tACL/iACL/VACL/PACLAccess Control List. ACLs are used to filter traffic based upon a set of rules that you define. For ACLs listed with a prefix (for example, t=transit, i=infrastructure, V=VLAN (Virtual Local Area Network), P=Port)), these ACLs have special purposes to address a particular need within the network.

FW/NGFW/FWSM/ASASM: Firewall/Next Generation Firewall/Firewall Service Module/Adaptive Security Appliance Services Module. These products provide a set of security features designed to govern the communications via the network. Cisco provides firewall features as a dedicated appliance or hardware module that can be added to a network device such as a router.

IPS: Intrusion Prevention System. Typically, this is a network appliance that is used to examine network traffic for the purposes of protecting against targeted attacks, malware, and application and operating system vulnerabilities. In order to ensure the effectiveness of a Cisco IPS device, it  should be maintained using Cisco’s IPS subscription service.

DNSSECDomain Name System (DNS) Security Extensions. That’s right, we have an acronym within an acronym. These are the specifications for security characteristics that make it possible to verify the authenticity of information stored in DNS. This validation makes it possible to provide assurances to resolvers that when they request a particular piece of information from the DNS, that they receive the correct information published by the authoritative source. Read More »

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Cisco Live USA 2013: Recap from a Network Security Engineer

Having just returned home to New Jersey from Cisco Live US in Orlando, Florida, I thought I’d share my experiences as a Network Security Engineer both attending and presenting at this year’s conference.

There were approximately 20,000 attendees at this year’s conference, which I believe set a new Cisco Live attendance record! Considering the huge size of the conference, which rivals game day attendance at some small market Major League Baseball teams, I was amazed at the efficiency and organization of the conference—from the session logistics to the World of Solutions “happy hours” and the Customer Appreciation Event held at Universal Studios!

While listening to the various keynote speeches, most notably those from John ChambersPadmasree WarriorRob Lloyd, and Edzard Overbeek, it’s clear that Security, is “Top of Mind” for the Cisco Leadership Team.

Out of the roughly 625 sessions, there were approximately 100 sessions and labs focused on security, including a few below, which were presented by some of my fantastic and extremely bright peers within the Security organization. Sessions and labs included relevant topics such as network threat defenseIPv6threat mitigation, and intrusion prevent and signature development.http://csio.cisco.com/blog/wp-includes/js/tinymce/plugins/wordpress/img/trans.gif Read More »

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Nine HIPAA Network Considerations

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Omnibus Final Rule, released January 2013, introduced some significant changes and updates. At the same time, over 100 HIPAA audits concluded in 2012. The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) released initial analysis of these audits in May 2013. The HIPAA Omnibus Final Rule and 2012 HIPAA audit results may influence how you run your network in the future. Here are nine network considerations that could impact your network and IT processes.

  1. HIPAA Audits will continue
  2. The HIPAA Audit Protocol and NIST 800-66 are your best preparation
  3. Knowledge is a powerful weapon―know where your PHI is
  4. Risk Assessment drives your baseline
  5. Risk Management is continuous
  6. Security best practices are essential
  7. Ignorance is not bliss
  8. Your business associate(s) must be tracked
  9. Breach discovery times: know your discovery tolerance

Each of these considerations will be explored in a nine-part blog series, posted on the healthcare blogs site.

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